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1 


2 


3 




1 2 3 

4 5 6 




FIRST LATm BOOK. 



EDITED BY 



ARCHD. H. BRYCE, LLD., D.C.L., F.R.S.E., 

RECTOR OF THE EDIWBUROH COLLEGIATE SCHOOL. 



THOMAS NELSON AND SONS, 

LONDON, EDINBURGH, AND NEW YORK. 

J. & A. M M I L L A N, 
Saint John, N.B. 



•| 



m il ■ I <i 



\ . 



f r^fari, 



The following Rentences, slightly altered from the Preface to 
he authors "First Greek Book," will sufficiently explain 
the scope and purpose of the present work :— 

"This volume is at once a Grammar, a Reader, an Exercise- 
liook, and a Vocabulary. Its aim is twofold -.—First To 
give a complete view of the Inflexions of Nouns and Verbs 
with a careful regard to simplicity and clearness ; and' 
Secondly, To supply a series of interesting and easy lessons 
in continuous reading. 

« In the Grammar, care has been taken not to overload the 
text with mmutiaB and exceptions, which serve only to confuse 
and bewilder the beginner; but to afford merely the amount 
ot information considered necessary in a First Course The 
Nouns and Verbs are so arranged that each class of Inflexions 
IS kept separate and distinct; and numerous Exercises follow 
each paradigm, in order that the characteristics of one group 
may be fixed in the mind of the pupil before his attention 
IS invited to another. The Nouns of the Third Declension 
have been classified on a plan which, it is hoped, will lead 
to a due appreciation of the pecuHarities belonging to that 
mmtiform division. "-The Verb has been set forth in a series 
ot iables, and on a new scheme, so arranged that it may 
coincide as far as possible with that adopted in the case of 
the Greek Verb, that parts having the same stem may be 
brought together, and that the relations of Time and Mode 
may be more clearly displayed. (See Section XII 8 9 n 
and 14, obs., pp. 46, 47.) ' ' ' 



Iv 



TREFACE. 



i : 



Adjectives should always be taught simultaneously with 
Substantives, and each gender-form jy itself ; but to ivfford 
facility for comparing form with form, and to gratify those 
Teachers who may prefer the old mode, paradigms have been 
printed in full declension at p. 29, sgq. 

" The Exercises of Part 1. are intended mainly as a praxis 
on the Inflexions, and to this end the strict logical arrange- 
ment of the Syntax has been entirely subordinated. The 
Rules of Construction have therefore been introduced in such 
order, and to such an extent, as has been deemed most con- 
sistent with the general plan, and most conducive to rapid 
progress.* The sentences, which by easy steps increase in 
difficulty, have been selected, as far as possible, from classical 
authors; but the choice of words and appropriate phrases 
has been very much restricted by peculiar features in the 
design of the work. Those forming the Exercises of Part I. 
have been largely taken from the Eeading Lessons of Part II., 
in order that the principle of frequent repetition may have 
as much play as possible; and that, when students arrive at 
the more difficult task of unravelling complex sentences, the 
often recurring faces of old friends may, by duninishing 
their difficulties, encourage them onward in their labours. 
Sentences of an abstruse or philosophical kind, such as too 
often form the staple of Introductory Readers, have been 
avoided, as tending rather to repel than to invite the young. 
The English portions of the Exercises are meant merely as 
examples for imitative practice, and a?e not intended to 
supersede the use of a methodically arranged Manual of 
Latin Composition." — Vocabularies have not, for very 
obvious reasons, been attached to the Exercises, but have 
been supplied at a different part of the book, p. 107, sqq. 

"It is of the utmost consequence that, in studying a 
foreign language, pupils should daily, and from the very first, 
make practical use of the principles and facts which they 
learn from the Gramma r. For such praxis, short and easy 

• A brief resutn^ of the Syntax of Simple Sentences wiU le fouul lu me^Ai)- 
peniUx, p. 150. ^ 



PREFACE. y 

clauses are, in the earlier stages, indispensable; but it is 
possible to continue their use to an unnecessary extent 
inasmuch as the power of a boy to grapple with the diffi' 
culties of complex sentences is by no means in proportion to 
the time spent m analysing simple sentences. It has there- 
fore been deemed prudent to introduce promiscuous readin.^ 
lessons as soon as the learner has fairly got over the Parts 
of Speech and their companion Exercises. And thus the 
Extracts formmg Part II. have been chosen with this view 
that, while the pupil's ingenuity is exercised in the discri- 
mination of mixed grammatical forms and the analysis of 
compound sentences, his mind may at the same time be 
notTl 'r^ : «^bject-matter of his task, and his ambition 
not disheartened by any great syntactical difficulties. "-For 
these purposes the Fables of Phaedrus stand unrivalled, and 
a *ew of the easiest and most interesting of them have 
accordingly been selected. The circumstance that they ale 
poetry may m the opinion of some, form an objection to 
heir use ; but it must be borne in mind that the poetry o^ 
lamhc Trimeters differs very slightly from prose, and^ha 
whatever drawback exists on this ground is amply counter 
balanced by the general accuracy of Latinity, eaL of con- 
ttrSL ^"^^^*^^^°- ^' -bj-t, which characterise 

Prn?" ^T^ ^""^Tl' ^'' *^^'" ^™^ ''^^ elementary work by 

a^ his model, wrought into a connected and easy narrative 
the most romantic legends and the most interesting episodls 

but tZl "'""• '''^ ''''' '' "^^ ^'^^y^ *^« -ft eCn 
text, both m the division of sentences and the mode of 

other by the Editor of Se ''G^adu^ied Seriei^of'' u'^'L"'^ ^•""^•" "'"'^ ^ha 
but due to ProfeMor Pillans to state ?S If /. "li^"''' Keadhig-Books." It is 

call attention (Prefacrto Ec o/af Cm't^^^^^^^ "! "'''"" '" "'" '="""*'-y '^ 

« an Initiatory Reading-Book. ^""^"""^^ »° "'« °>eiita of M. Lhomond's «U 



n PREFACK. 

expression ; but the Editor did not feel himself at liberty to 
encroach too far on the original form of the work. He baa 
also adopted some of Dr. Smith's judicious ameudmenta. 

TH« EOINBUllUK (JOLLEUIATE SCHOOL, 1878. 



•i 



NOTE. 



" In the first edition of this work a slight deviation was made, in the arrange- 
ment of the Cases of Nouns, from the order usually followed. The change 
was determined on after mature deliberation, and after a highly satisfac- 
tory trial with a large class ; but at the urgent request of many Teachers 
the Editor has been induced to revert in the present issue to the old estab- 
lished order. Those, however, who prefer the new arrangement will find 
Nouns so printed at p. 103. This is not the place to enter into the 
more subtile arguments, V)gical and philological, which may be advanced 
in favour of the alteration ; for a few of these tie student of maturer years 
will consult the Preface to Professor Madvig's Latin Grammar, Wood's 
translation, (second edition.) The considerations which will weigh most 
with Teachers in adopting the change are those of convenience and mne- 
monic utility. It may therefore bo laid down, generally, that the more 
the forms of Cases are reduced in number, or the more that like Cases 
are grouped together, even though not reduced in number-, the simpler does 
the system of declension become to the learner. Thus the forms of Neuter 
Nouns are acquired with much less difiicalty, and retained with much more 
ease, than those of Masculines and Feminines, from the fact that they 
have really only three Cases, — malum, mali, malo : for it must be remem- 
bered that a ' Case is not the word used in a certain construction, but the 
word used in a certain form by virtue of the construction;' and that, con- 
sequently, ' there are no more Cases in a language than there are distinct 
fomM of Cases.' But if we follow this grouping principle farther, we shall 
also find it of great service in the declension of Masculines and Femi- 
ninss."— Thus, in the Singular Number, the Nom. and Voc, which are 
always alike except in Nouns of Decl. II., like serms, — the Gen. and 
Dat. of Decls. I. and V., — and the Dat. and Abl. of Decl. II., are respec- 
tively brought together. In the Plural Number the advantage is still 
more evident ; for while the Dat. and Abl. are set side by side, the Nom. 
and Voc, — or in Declensions III., IV., and V., the Nom., Voc, and 
Accus., — are in like manner brought together. Inflexions having the 
same vowel {-as, -arum; -as, -orum; -a, -am, &c.) follow each other; and 
the attention of the pupil is forcibly directed to the Nom. and Accus., 
which are not only of most frequent occurrence in reading, but which 
also express the two most prominent Nouna in every sentence, — the 
munes of the agent and the object.* 



* See lotruductiua to Dr. WoodfoiU'a Latin Grammar. 



1 



€anttniB, 



PART I 

THE PASTS OP SPEECH. 

ijaoTtoN 

I. Tlio Letters, &c 

n. First Declension-Examples and Exercises, 
in. Second Declension-Exampleg and Exercises, 

IV. Third Declension. ... _ " 

Class I._Of Nouns-Examples and Exercises, 
Class n.-Of Nouns-Examples and Exerci8e^ 
Class III._Of Nouns-Examples and Exercises, 
Class I V.-Of Nouns- Examples and Exercises, 
Class V.-Of Nouns-Examples and Exercises, 
Class Vl.-Of Nouns-Examples and Exercises, 
Class VII.- Of Nouns-Examples and Exercises, 
Complex Nouns-Examples and Exercises ... 

V. Fourth Declension- Examples and Exercises, 
VI. Fifth Declension-Examples and Exercises, ' .,. 

VII. Adjective Nouns- Examples and Exercises, . 
VIII. Irregular Nouns, ... 
I. Substantives, 
II. Adjectives, with Exercise, 
IX. Comparison of Adjectives, with Exercise, .'." 

X. Numerals, 
XL Pronouns, 

*** ••• ••• 

I. Substantive Pronouns, 
11. Adjective Pronouns, with Exercise, 
XIL The Verb, 

••• ••• „, 

XIII. First Conjugation of Regular Verbs, 

Exercises on Verbs of Conjugation I 

XIV. Second Conjugation of Regular Verbs, .[, 

Jixercises on Conjugation II 



Pauk 

U 
11 
18 
lA 
16 
17 
19 
20 
21 
22 
U 
24 
26 
27 
39 
33 
83 
3fi 
36 
89 
41 
41 
49 
46 
48 
52 
Si 
68 



vm 



C0NTKNT8. 



fnrioo 

XV. Third Conjugation, 

Eierciicson CoajDKutlon III 

XVI. fourth CoTiJiiKatlon, 

Kxorcl»«»on ConJuK«tlon IV., .„ 
XVII. Deponent Verbs, with Exurclso, 
XVIIL Irregular Verbs, iuin, Ac., with KxcrcisoE, 
XIX. Defective Verts, cotpi, mtmini, Ac, 
XX. Imperaonal VertNS with ExerciHUA, ... 
XXL Indeclinable Parte of Speech, AdTcrbn, IMejx.sltloii*, 
The Declensloni, Ac, with the Coaos In an altered order, 
Llatft of WurOa used in each Exercise, 



••• 



Ac, 



f»ua 

ao 

64 
66 

70 
71 

78 

N 

M 

100 

lot 

107 



S ' 



PART 11. 
EXTRACTS FOB READINQ. 



I. Fablea of Pliuedrua, 
II. itoinaa History, 



119 
U1 



li 



APPENDIX. 

Drief Synopsis of the Syntax of Simple Sentenced, 
I. Subject and Predicate, ... 
II. The Cases, 

Nominative and Vocative, 

Accusative, ... 

Genitive, 

Dative, 

Ablative, 
III. Infinitive Mood, Ac, 

Participle, ... 

Gerund, 

Snplnes, 
Notes on the Extracts, ... 
Rules for Gender of Nouns, 
Rules of Syntax, 
IiTeguIar Verbs, List of. 



100 

IM 
Ifil 
161 
161 
163 
168 
164 
166 
156 
156 
156 
167 
168 
175 
178 



Latix Vocabitlart, 

EhCLISU VoOABULAKI, 



IDO 
240 



J>4lll 

60 

64 

66 

70 

7'J 

78 

04 

96 

100 

103 

107 



no 

187 



ISO 
IfiU 
Ifil 
161 
161 
163 
163 
164 
15« 
166 
156 
156 
167 
168 
175 
178 



FIRST LATIN BOOK. 



V 



PART I. 

THE PARTS OF SPEECH. 



SECTION I. 
THE LETTERS. 

1. The Latin alphabet is the same as the English, except that w 
Is wanting. 

2. The letters are of two classes— Vowels and Consonants. 

3. The Vowels are six— a, e, {, o, u, y. 

4. Consonants are either,— 

(1.) Semi- vowels*— Z, m, n, r, and the sibilant, s; or, 
(2.) Mutes-/>, bj, v; c, k, q,g; t, d. 

5. The Mutes admit of a double classification : (1.) according to 
the organ by which they are pronounced ; and (2) according to the 
degree of breathing employed in their utterance. Thus,— 

LABIAM. PALATALS. LINGUAL DENTALS. 

^ ^ ^(/torj) t light or sharp. 

.■•■;: 9 d. intermediate 

J\I>l^)^^^v {ch) (M) rough or flat. 



«nrt ^''°'''?! ' w,*^ ''?'^'° c'"»>'acteri8tic8:-/'tr.<, It e<me, freely In pronunclatlo.-,, 
and, Secondly, When it is once formed it can be prolonged. 1 He seml-vowels powcM 



I 



10 



if 



if 



FIRST L\TIN HEADER. 



6 X and z are double consonants, being eqnal-^ to cs or as Cpit)- 
nouuced as h), and sometimes to /is or qus; z to sd or c^*. 

7 A is not properly a letter, but a hrmthing, j \s the coasonai.t 
aound of i, and v of u. 

a Diphthongs are composed of two vowels combined tx^gether in 
pronunciation. The most common diphthongs are «., o^au Z 
km common, ei, eu, oi, ui , , ^, luo 

n. There are three Genders-Masculine, Feminine, Neuter. 

063. -Jn English, the gender of all substantives is decided by the 

ZTZ' 1 '° ''■ '' ^ ''f'' ^-^ ^^^^^^ ^^ *^- names of men 
M?rn *^',J°7^ ^"^™-^s; but ia nouns depleting tnavtmate 

lender '^^''T^^^'^- ^^ *^« --d usually detln>iaesTi« 

femimne; rex, a to^, xnasc; regina, « gw^en, fem.; hortus. a 
garden, raasc.;, mensa, a ia6/e, fem. 

Pl^tlTr r^^-^— ^^^ S^S^-> used of one ; and the 

12 Nouns are divided into five da. 3s, called Declensions, accord- 
mg to the system of mfiexions adopted in forming their Cases. The 
declension to wluch a noun belongs is known by the inflexion* of tlie 
genitive singular. 



13. There are eight Parts of Speech :- 



DECLINABLK. 

Substantive (Noun). 
Adjective (Noun). 
Pronoun. 
Verb, 



INDECLINABLE. 

Adverb. 
Preposition. 
Interjection. 
Conjunction. 



n.m.e„; „ „„,. ,„ ^L TL.1„rxr rS^m'^l ^^.'4= '"" 
■ae, -am, -d, -arum, -ii, -o*. *c The si--m nf « r,^., . Z change; aa 

».=r tl,. l„«„ta'„, ,te 8e,«iv. r,uto : r from ^-S*'™' " "*'°'' 
~».- remain. „ th, „.„, , ,,„,„ icr,iM^\ll; .iZTTcr ,.^ '""' T "" 



f 



■iE' ■ 



FIUST LATIN READER. 



n 



SECTION II. 

FIRST DECLENSION. 

^in^;'^^ft"°"''?-1 f ^' ^^^^«"«io» end, in the nominative singular. \ 
in -a, those winch have -., -as, or -.., are Greek, and are princS 
proper names. Nouns in -a and -.are feminine; those in -L Si / 
masculme. The genitive singular ends in -a. 7 



f men % 






^♦, 






, Ace. 
AU. 



SlNQULAn. 

bm. Men8-&, a table.* [table. 
Mens-ae, a table's, or of a 
Mens-ae, to or/of a table. 
Mens-am, a table. 
Mens-a, table I 
Mens-a, from, with, in, or 
bp a table. 



Plural. 
Mens-ae, tables. 
Mens-arum, tables', or of tables. 
Mens-is, to or for talks. 
Meas-as,' iables. 
Mens-ae, tables/ 
Mens-is, from, with, in, or hy 
tables. 



008 --What we express in English by prepositions is very often fndicated 

Thus inSrJfh'' r'^'lt " *'^ ^"•^ '' * ^''^' <*•-•' - -fl-ion^ 
tv^'oll ^"&J'«^,^^^Jeave the nouns zmcA««</«rf, and, to vary the meanl 
ing, change the httle word going before, {preposition;) as oJThe 
qveen, (= the queen's, ), on the gueen, ^rthcquL Th eisprope ly 
only one case m English-the possessive or genitive. 

2. A few nouns have -abus in the dative and ablative plural 
as -t^ They are such as have a masculine of the same stem 
Second Dec ension j as,/^.-a, a daughter,-but/^i-t..., a son, om» 
Second Declension. So dea, anima, equa, mula, Uherta, and some 



SlNaULAR. 

Nom. Fili-a, a daughter. 
Oen. Fili-ae, a daughter's, or of 
a daughter. 
Fili-ae, to or for a daughter. 
Fili-am, a daughter. 
Fili-a, daughter / 
Fili-a, from, with, or by a 
daughter. 



Dai. 
Ace. 

Voc. 
AU. 



Plural. 
Fili-ae, daughters. 
Fili-arum, daughters', or of 

daughters. 
Fili-abus, or filiis, to or for 
Fili-as, daughters. [daughters. 
Fili-ae, daughters I 
Fili-abus, or filiis, from, with, or 

hy daughters. 



^ B.-The feminine forms of adjectives, in a, are d eclined like mensa. 



J 




12 



FIJIST LATIN READKR. 





1 



■^■' 






Aquilae. Aquilas ' R/gnam. Pugnarum. AquUis. Porta7 
( Porta. Porta ) J>ue%;. Puellamm Portia^ Pugnas. AnciUa. 
Lunam. Ancma.^ Ancillarum. FiIi^t&asa£-<AncUie' (f^nSf.T^'i 
Gems. Umbras. Silvae. Umbram. Aquilarum. Pennis FUi- 
abus. Fundaa. Fundae. Umbris. Silvarum. Regina. Reginas. 
Nautae. Nautas. Linguam. Linguis. NymphS. Nyraphn," 
j«j Musca. Muscarum. Peram. PUae. AncSras. Ai.cSris. Aulam 
Aulas. Perae. Ancoramm. Deas. Deae. Janua. Januarum. 

The battle. The battles. Of the sling. The moons. The moon 
Of the queen. The queen's. The queens. The queens'. For 
queen. Of the daughters. The language. The tongue 
languages. Of the flies. To the maid-servant. The eagles. 

3. (Syntax) Rule l}—An adjective agrees with its ovm substan- 
, tive m gender, number, and case : as, fabula longa, (Jem.,) a long 

atory; fabulae longae, {pi,) Img stories; amicus fidus, (mo^c.,) a 
tanhful frvend; amicos fidos, faithful friends; praemium mag- 
num, (neut.,) a great reivard. 

4. (Syntax) Rulb II.- Th.e prepositions m, (in, among;) cum, 
(together with;) a or ab, (from, by;) e or ex, (out of from the 
midst of) govern the ablative: as, in sHva, in tJie forest; cum 
ancilla, along with the maid-servant. 

5 (Syntax) Rule III.-^ verb agrees with its mbject in number 
and person: aquila est, aquilae sunt. 

6. (Syntax) Rule lY.—One substantive governs, in the gmUive, 
Mth^ ^'^^y'^*'^^ « <^'P^'^i ihing; as, penna aquilae, the eagles 

7. Est (Zd sing.) means is ; sunt (:id pi), are. 

EXERCISE II. 

(3.) Via lata. Dea sancta. Ancora c.irva. Portae latae Viae 
angustae. Vias angustas. Portanmi latarum. Puellae sedulae. 
BUvae latae. ^Portis angustis.J AquUae validae. 

^.) In silva. In casis. Cum puella. Cum filia. In caaa. In 
porta lata Cum puellis sedulis. Cum regma beata. In via angusta 
l^um Wiabus parvis. In parva casa. 



(6.) Ancilla eat ftissa. 






sunCvoc. 



1 




FTR8T LATIN RKADKR. 



IS 





Filia est beata. Aquila est valida. Formicas sunt parvae. Regina 
est caeca. Luna est clara. 

(6.) Pluraa aquilae. Plumae aquilae. Plumae aquilanim. Janua 
casae. Gena publlae. Umbrae silvarum. In umbra silvae. In 
casa agricolae. Funda nautae. Ferae nautarum. Agricolae filia. 
Cum niia agricolae. In densa umbra silvarum. Cum deabus Sanctis 
FUiareginaeestpulchra. AnciUa est formosa, Anc8rae sunt curv^ 
Janua caaae est lata. Portae sunt apertae. Lingua Belgarum 
Agricolae sunt in silvis. Nauta est in agricolae casa. Formosa filia 
nautae est in casa reginae. Pulchrae filiae nautarum sunt in splendida 
aula reginae. ^'Sedulae ancUlae sunt in parva casa dx)minae. Pennae 
aquilarum sunt longae. In sUvis multae sunt muscae. Filia mea 
^st pulchra. * 

The gates are wide. The gates of the palace are wide The 
farmer's hut is small. The forest is dense^ The eagle's winga b^ 
long. There are many flies in the husbandman's cottage The 
woods are dense. The balls are round. The queen's cheeks are 
pale. The moOn is bright. Your daughters are beautiftil (in feat- 
ures). The girl's hair is auburn. There is a rouna table in the 
husbandman's cottage. 



SECTION III. 



SECOND DECLENSION. 



1. Nouns of this declension end in 
-er, "Ivy -ur, or -urn. Words in -um 
-ir, -Mr, masculine or feminine. The 

SlNQUIiAR. 

(1.) Nom. Serv-U8, masc, a slave. 
Gen. Serv-i, of a slave. 
Dot. Serv-d, to or for a slave. 
Ace. Serv-um, a dave. 
Voc. Serv-S, slave! 
All. 6erv-b,/rom, dx., a slave 



the nominative singular in -t«, 
are neuter; those in -us^ -er, 
genitive singular ends in -i. 

PinRAii. 
Serv-I, slaves. 
Serv-Srum, o/slarfx. 
Serv-is, to or for slaves. 
Serv-Ss, slaves. 

a^ ^ 1 >\ _. .- 

Bbtv-U, from, ttc., slaves. 



!4 



FIRST LATIN READER. 




(2.) N<m, 
Oen. 
JJat. 
Ace. 
Voc. 
Abl. 



SlKQULAR. 

Piler, masc, a boy, 
Pugr-i, of a boy. 
Puer-o, to or for a hoy. 
Puer-um, a boy. 
Puep, boy I 
Puer.'O, from, Ac, a boy. 



PliURAt, 

Puer-i, boys. 
Puer-orum, of boys. 
Puer-is, to or for boys. 
Puer-os, boys. 
Puer-i, boys ! 
Puer-is, /rom, <tr., hoys. 

Magistr-i, masters. 
Magistr-orum, of mmfers. 
Magistr-is, to or for masters 
Magistr-os, mcistcrs. 
Magistr-i, masta-s/ 
Magistr-is, /rom, d-c, mas- 
ters. 

Singular, 
(^.)N. V.d:Acc.. Mal-um, neut., an apple. 
Gen. Mal-i, of an apple. 
Dat. Mal-o. to an apple. 
Abl. Mal-o, from, dbc, an 
apple. 



fS.) Nom. Migister, masc, a master. 

Gen. Magistr-i, o/om<w<er. 

Magistr-o, to ox for a master. 

Magistr-um, a rrmstcr. 

Magister, master! 

Magistr.o,/rom,d-c.,arna*- 
ter. 



Dat. 
Ace. 

Voc. 
Abl. 




Pr-CRAL. 

Mal-a, apples. 
^Bl-oram, of apple.i. 
Mal-is, to apples. 
Mal.is,//-ow, dbc, apples. 



3 Adjectives which have the masculine in -us or -er and fh. 
neuter in ^m are declined like substantives of this "'edensi^, 
Th. nmculme m -us has the same inflexions a^ serms- TTZ 

EXERCISE III. 

(I.) Wgiti. Digitis. Oculus. Hortorum Oculum qArv? rk« i 



fc*\) 



U.' f ' < 



FIRST LATIN REAPER. 



15 



1 



1 1-*^ 



equo est in agricolae horto. Rami pfip„li sunt parvi. Refdnaeequus 
^^^^estalbus. Albos yitulos agricola^, Deus est sanctus. Deus* sancte. 
Oculi nautanim sunt acuti. , 

(2.) Pueri Pneros. Ocili puerorum sunt teneri. Genercg, gqcfiri ^" 
Socerorura. Generis. Cum generis. Generum. m^, FiHae ./ Y^ 
amici^tui sunt miserae. Cum miseris liberis regina^TTide puer ' "* ^"^^^ 
nnser amice! Digiti agricolae sunt longi. 

(3 ) Magistri. Agros. In agris magistri. In agros viri. Pulcher .>>.«*^ 
^tulus agricolae m horto est poetae. Magister care.Tn parvam ^Z^^T 
Belgaecasam. In parva Belgae casa. Teneros vitulos vaccae. <* ^ ^^ 

(4.) Templo. In templo. In templum. Ad terapluiTd^i. In ' 
templa deomm. In templis deorum. Aqnilae ova. Lata arva 
agncolae. Poma sunt matura. Colla equorum sunt curva. Portae 
temph sunt latae. Aperta est janua casae. - Cum donis reginae 
1 8ha populi sunt parva. In horto magistri mala sunt matura. 

The horses. The horse's. The horses'. In the gardens. Into the ' 
fields of the master. In the eagle's eggs. The temple is spacious. 
My shadow is long. Your slave is faithful. The horse's tongue is 
rough. ^ The Belgian's gifts are hateful. The hatred of the man is 
great. Poplar trees are tall. Among the leaves of the poplar Mv 
eyes are weak. The neck of your swan is long. The cow is in the 
field^with her calf. The boy's cheeks are pale. The gods are holy 
In the temples of the gods there are many gifts. There are many 
npe apples m your father-in-law's gardt^n. There is a tall poplar 
tree m the wood. The shadow of the poplar trees is long. The 
children of th»poet are much-loved. 




SECTION IV. 

THIRD DECLENSION. 

1. In the First and Second Declensions the stem of a noun may 
be easily distinguished, even in the r, n inative ; but in the Third 
Declension it is so disguised, by the onassion of consonant, or the 
modification of vowels, that it cannot be known without reference to 



>«A>V>I»— J.l_ 



• Deus has the vocativn thn •!>"»» »=♦»"•• _ 



16 



PniST LATIN RRADER. 




"« th, «m in the nomimlCf ^"^' "*'"* '"*" ^''■'« 

.-.i^f LTi^r;::?" """ """^ "^''^ ^-^ "^ 

Singular. 
{l.)A.d-Voc. Soror, km., a sister. 
Gen. Soror-Ig. 
■Da^ Soror-i. 
Ace. Soror-em. 
Abl. Soror-g. 



Plural. 
Soror-es, sisters. 
Soror-um. 
Soror-Ibus. 
Soror-es. 
Soror-ibng. 



2.) iV. d: Voc Prftt-r r Plural. ,? 

^«- Fratr-em. r"?"' 

AU. Animal-it Anuna - b„. 

4. (Syntax) Rule Vr__7»Xz. • . 

jnf m«A«.,- pater „eu« es^C™ «t^„,?' P?''^' '' "'»'«'./'«'i^ 

BIERCISE rv. ' ^ 

therefore ^^ ,„ the nli; .?ve*"pi.S iTili" A'^i"^^"'"^"' '"^tead of ... and h... 
u-=; '-" "'C genitive piurni. 






n^T LATIN READEB. 



17 



Fratres et sorores. Cam sororibus et fratribns S^«"^q«i «• 
aoe Exmercatpribus. Dolor matristet ^^ '^'- ^^' 

magni. Circum casam patns ^ TaL n''^''"'" '""* W 
fiunt Aratorcumaj-atro Pvo *, ^ puellarum formosi "^ 

Timor fimim es mTgnt ExX^fir'' ?^-f ^^^ «""* timidi. 

agros. Lupus inter ca.^ vZmm a1 ''' '" '^^'°^^ 
Caesarem victorem. "" P'^^""^'"- Ante januam caaae. Apud 

(3.;Animali. Animalis. Calcaria FuJmir PoI, • 
E. ani^alibu.. Ani,„alK Pal^Zt tS^™ Ad T" """■ 
Circum portam ODoidL Tahnmc x *^®^6res. Ad aggerem. 

laboresexulum. FuLura ctlf C^^^^^^ I"ter 

radii sunt clan, cl'a^^tor^^^^^^^^^^^ Solis 

rait^x:::" — --.rer^ 

of the RoLn plplfs ^ It In tbl t?'f ''^ ^"*- ^^^ ^^^^ 
hut. Into the exiles' hutfwi^h \T^'' ^^*- ^""'^ *^««^e'i 
near the mound The ramm!I« great honours. Caesar's statui i^ 
level plain. Around theTor-/^^^^^^ Throughout th? 

The bo. . in the ^^::Z^£j^ Jj^f ^er is good. 

n^^iSe:^:^^;:^;:^^^ in the 

(Q a city ; rei-e, (n.,) a net. ^ ^' ^^^ '*^^ = «^' ^^^^^. 



a.) ^. ^ roc. Xrrb-E, f., a c%. 
G^CTi. ITrb-is. 
Dot. Urb-i. 
■^cc. ITrb-em. 
Ml. Urb-e. 
"^ ^cc. ifcet-e, n., a nc<. 



(122) 



Oen. Bet-is. 
^i^ Ket-i. 



PlUR-AL. 

^rb-es, cities. 

Urb-Ium. 

Urb-ibus. 

Urb-ea. 

I^rb-ibus. 

Bet-la, nets. 
Bet-inin, 

Bet-ibus. 
Ret-ibas. 



18 



FIRST LATIN READER. 



6. As X is equal to cs or gs, (see Section I. fi,) all nouns ending In 
r belong to this class ; thus, dux = dues, lex = leg-». 



SlNOULAR. 

jr. <6 Voc. Lex (legr-8), f., a law. 

Gen. Leg-is. 

Dat. Leg-i. 

Ace. Leg-em. 

AU. Leg-e. 



Plubai. 
Leg-es, 7aw«. 
Leg-um. 
Leg-ibus. 
Leg-es. 
Leg-ibuB. 



7. (Syntax) Ritlb Nil.— Since two singulars are equal to a 
plural, two singular subjects connected hy a co-ordinative conjunc- 
tion (et, ac, atque, -que, &c.) have a verb or adjective in the plural; 
as, Pater et filius sunt clari, the father and the son are famous. 



m.\, !i 



EXERCISE V. 

(l.)Hiemem. Piebis. Trabes. Urbium. TJrbe. Inurbe. Exurbl- 

bus. Plebem. Trabi. Trabes. Pace. Vocis. Magna voce. Justam 

legem. Aequas leges. Portae magnarum lu-bium. Longas trabes. 

f/t. ^^^^''ce- Ad formosum gregem . Duces sunt fessi bello. Regumo^ii 

^|^■^i''tWco^onae sunt splendidae. Pater mens est in urbe. Prater tuus"^ 

■ est dux Belgarum. Taini sunt feroces. Pater mens ct mater sunt 

Telices. Per sanctas leges. .-.Jgejlttni est atrox. Inter aquilas veloces, 

$U£!U (2.) MaCB est planum. Betia ^mt rara. Inter rara retia. Monil e >ud L 



(VU 



^ 



est splendidura. Monile reginao est magnum. Undae maris sunt 
longae. Aqua est pura. Aqua maris. Longae sunt radices populialtae. 
Magnus grex corvorum. Magni sunt ^eges corvorum in silvis. 
Inter hiemem. Hiemes longas. Sedili a in horto regis sunt longa. 

The general of the Romans. THe walls of the citadel. The laws 
of the city. The deep sea. The girl's magnificent necklaces. The 
king is just. The daughter of the farmer is happy. The master .ad 
his slave are foolish. The sailors' nets are wide-meshed.y The farmer's 
wife is foolish. The queen's consort is happy. Around the walls of 
the city. The generals of the Romans ave daring in war. Among 
the flocks of crows. Towards the level sea. In the wide-meshed 
nets of the sailors. 



^i*..KJL^ 



(V«~r<-ij-;^v 



8. Adjectives such as inops are declined like urbs, [but inops makes 
gen. plur. in-wm;] those in x, a&felix, are declined like lex, [huifelix 






flit i/itti.. 






s ending In 



D8. 



equal to a 
« conjuTM- 
he plural I 
mous. 



!. Exiirbl- 

5. Justam 

jas trabes. 

). Regum^^^t^ (.y 

'rater tuus' 

mater sunt 

las veloces, ^ 

a. Monile )uck^-- 

maris sunt ^^-t^^-^ 

)puli altae. 

I in silvis. (^-»-r«MJ-;^L 

it longa. 

The laws 
ices. The 
naster .ad 
le farmer's 
le walls of 
Among 
le-meshed 



I 



i^RST LATIX RRADER. jg 

tives in -M, as mtiu, mttis, mite) like rete ThA «,]. f 

SlNOtTLAB. p,„ 

Cl^d-eu, f., a defeat.- CW^^^L , 

Clad-i. £,^*^-^^^°^- 

^rc. dad-em. «ad-ibu«. 

4W. Clad-e. 5,^*^-!f- 

Clad-iboi. 



N. <fe Tar. 
<7cn. 
Dat. 



Ap-es heea. 

Ap-um (or ap-iuia.) 

Ap-ibus. 

Ap-es. 

Ap-ibus. 



N. A Voe. Ap-is {or apes) f., « i^^ 
Cen. Ap-ia. 
i>o<. Ap-i. 
Ace. Ap-em. 
Abl. Ap-e. 

10. A large class of adjectives are derHnp.1 in *i, 
fern nine, like ^;,^, (but lee Sect'n V l'^, w"*?""^ ^"^ 
neuter follows ..,.,. thus,^.«.^,^, ™';:, ^' ^/^ ^) -^^e the 

11. The present indicative active of a verb otihT^\n • 
tion IS declined as follows ;- ^"^* Conjuga- 

Am-a-8, 

Am-a-tis, 
Youlwe. 



SiNo.— Am-o, 
J love. 

PnjB.~Ani-a-inw, 
WeUm.* 



EXERCISE VI. 



Am-S-t, 

Am-a-nt, 
TJiep love. 



ops makes 

\h\Afelix 

of aujcc- 







B«]a regis coenant. Inter aures canis muscA volat. Caesar festinat 
inltalmm. Co£n^,8. Cum patre festinas in silvam. Ei^lTl^^/a'/t^t 
gravis auro In ta^rnara ton«oris festinant nautae. Malus navjj ^^Yk\ 
est altus. Mah navium sunt l^m^ Panis est llvi.. Juvenesliira /. /', j 
cans sororibus m agricolae hoiSmuKT AgSjola arat. Fortes " T 
vin cum hostibus patriae pugnant. %£es sunt alt». Vulpes est M^t fl^i 
calhda. Sena in agncolaecasa coenant. Crines juvenum sunt nigri 
Caper et capeUa saltant in agro. Vates sunt sancti. Breves sunt 
earns tm aures. 

The dove flies The beautiful daughter of the king is walking in 
the citizen s garden. The queen's maid-servant is hastening to the 
palace All the Belgians are brave. The months of spring are short. 
1 he hUls are white. I am hastening to the territories of the Belgians 
a he cunning foxes are walking round the farmer's cottage. The 
months of spring are agreeable. Along with the wild boar. The 
young men's axes am sharp. 

I 1^1 /^^-^ J^® Fourth Class includes those nouns which drop the 
last letter of the stem in the nominative: as, sermo (for sermon) 
termonuj lac (for lact-), lactis; cor (for cord-), cordis; poerm (for 
foemat'), poematis. ^ 

SllCaULAR. 

N. ds Voc. Sermo, m., conversaium. 
Oen. SermSn-is. 



Dat. Sermon-i. 
Ace. Sermon-em. 
Abl. Sermon-e. 

J\r. V. ds Ace. Cor, n., the heart. 
Oen. Cord-is. 
DaX. Cord-i. 
AU. Cord-e. 



Flttral. 
SerjiSn-es, conversations. 
Sermon-am. 
Sermon-ibus. 
8ermon-es. 
Sermon-ibns. 

Cord-a, fieartt. 
Cofd-am. 
Cord-ibus. 
Cord-ibuB. 



13. (Syntax) Rulb YIIL-Transttive* verbs govemf tkeaccics- 



• For explanation of transitive verbs see Section XII 

t By the term " govern" it is simply meant that the practice at the Tjifin. ... L 
put an accusative case after a transitive verb. So in EnS U s ti^^^rLI^ S 
use that form of nouns which we call the ok^ect^c^X^^^m i^erTalL 
verb, and prepodtion.; .a » He struck me" ^not,He,tn^ir'Sw1iZdJlthZ^' 
ibtre. '•■ "' '""" "' ''"' '^'"^'"^^ verbTtnd^pCaiJ^r,;:^"^, 



t 




FIRST LATIN READER. 21 



EXERCISE Vlf. 



■'U.r-("' 



r >\i 



Poeta laudat sermonem Oirnrnnia t-*-- /° 

Ciceroni, erat dufcif QteriaS V '-^SSS' "«»*• Oratio ► A^ 

ir- 'Co„d."on«tle..tf^Sr'r^*'^ .Poem breve laudat 

PanoLto;^ ate Itt ^S^Z r"°°" "" ''^''^'^'^ 
Ot'Vo pocula.albi lactig. . ^"^" '^S^^ lajLftm^it Agricolae amant 



.^H^^-" 



1} 



J* 



his own town The^lkrf nf Vk ? ^f ^^^^'an loves tb , fields of 
tuwii. xnepiijarsof the temple of Juno ars h{,»», mu 

K ad'Lire^ the spta^d M ,T ^T t'e V°""" ?' 
w-th their servant., ar. buUding .lotC^' ^^' "™™' "^^ 

^^"th^irt"'^rr«':r^r;iT"^'*-v»' 



Singular. 

<t Voc. Laus (/or Lan-d-s), f., ;,;^i,e. 
Cm. Laud-is. 
Dot. Land-i. 
Ace. Laad-em. 
^oi. Lauii-«, 



Pluhal. 

Land-es, praises. 

Laud-urn. 

Land-ibus. 

tanAffS 

Laud-ibuB. 



I 



'"tir^'iWT'mmmi^SMm.^ i 



93 



KIUHT LATIN BKAti 



KR. 



SlWODtAR. 

A^. <* r,«. Prom (for Pron-t-t), f.. theforthcad. 
Oen. Front-it. 
J)at. Front-I. 
Ace. Front-em. 
Abl. Front-©. 



PliORAl.. 

tronU9», /oreAeailt. 

Front-ium.* 

Frout-ibm. 

Front-ei. 

Front-ibui. 



aa|«.t,v« „f ,m,Uar ttrm,.«t.on, are d^dined like tho m^ of thi, 



..^.^EXEflOISE VIII 






111 ? 



irsas puen est tenuis. Virtus parentium est niag^dorlLaud 
DelTEt^":f T"'"^ cpiditatibu,. Libert.. e.t donum Det 

his m^ ,;, « u r ""'" *" ""= ™'"'=- Tl-^ »<^"'«'t ploughs 
h.3 -n^te^s fields with stody oxea Death's foot is in?parS 
(t. «., the visits of Death are impartial.) mipartial 

17. (TI.) The ^atTja^ss^embraces those nouns in which the 



• Observe that mciiAayl.! ,,',;f: ,;, a, uhf. *.._. ilZZTTTT'T' " 

by a consonant, t:.ke . ..; o i^ genlUve S b^t f h r^' f."'' '"'"'"' ^'•^''^''«<» 
a rowel precede^ the B^n.tlve ST^^ll un. Z ?'.'"' """• '''''''' 

Oramijur, pp. 4<i, 47. ^^""^ excepiiorts, see Schmitzs 



FIRST LATIN UEAKKR. 



28 



finHl vowel of the «teii. fn ,' .nged in the nominative: a« .tern. 
;-.m, but nonunufve, nor,...; «tea, cupit, but nun.inativ" c^l.,!:;: 



SlNUULAH. 

A'. V. ds Ace. Ndmen, n., o name. 
Oen. Nomln-ii. 
JJat. Nomin-i. 
AbU Nomi&HS. 

A^ V. d' Ace. Caput, n., the head. 
Oen. Caplt-ii, 
l>at, Capit-i, 
Abl. Capit-6. 



Plurau 
Homln-a, namee. 
Nomin-um. 
Komin-ibni. 
Nomin-ibui. 

Caplt-a, /leuda. 
Capit-um. 
Capit-ibui. 
Capit-ibui. 



.io!>Vj;:s*:i:t:!:'' ■^'^ »• « -" »' "■« I'-t co„j„,a- 



BiMo.— Am-a-bam, 

/ wa3 loving, 
pLi;R.-.Am-a-bamii8, 

We were loving. 



Am-a-bai, 

Thou wast loving. 
Am-a-batis, 

}'ou were loving. 



Am-a-b&t, 

lie was loving. 
Am-a-bant, 

Thej/ were loving. 



I EXERCISE IX. 
er pueros bono, amabit. Vulcanus f„lu,i„a Jovi Srat^d " 



liP.nV«n -D X- -.:x::iii:r ^:iii.v""»uii. x^umiiia mentis sunt 

A Jion waa killing a tender lamb with his te^fh TKn T ^^ -^ 

THe^na/JbS„,[tJ;S;;~tr^^^^^ 

-. T«:« -., vro waiKiug in the shepherd's jjarden, '°""" * 



f^. 



(1 



r 



1£U 



~'-.~.fmi. . --.iKSi^^* 



24 



f i 



!i ■ ' III 



»h 



■1;^ i 




ilRST LATIN RKADKR. 



which t:I";LnHt of r:;: ''"? "^ ""«"' '">« '>-■" - 



Singular, 
If. d' Voc. Flos, rn., ajlower. 
Oen. F16r-i8. 
Dot. Flor-i. 
Ace. Flor-em. 
Abl. Flor-e. 



Pl-DRAIi. 

F16r-es, jlowcrs. 

Flor-um. 

Flor-ibug. 

Flor-es. 

Flor-ibuB. 



EXERCISE X. 



Ul^ 



horto. ^rtS:^ --J^^;^^^^^ Ante ora patris puer saltaiin /-^rf< 

The flowers in the shepherd's garden delight my sister Your ^ 
the liver there are many flowers. The doves were giving kisses to 

o^ts T- "^H^ -^"'"^ °' *^" "'"'*^ -« - ^^- "-tioT^ 

mole IlTa^S. '' ""'• ''^ '"^'^'^'"^'^" ^^^ ™^«^ ^ ^^"^^ 

t.n?"o •^^''; ""''"" f!'""''' '''^''^' enumerated comprehend all the impor- 
tant s.nj.le varieties of tliis declension ; hut there are many noun 

cTl' Cr '/' ^t^^,^ "^?^^ ^'^ ^^^^"^-^^'^ «^ -- tliai one 

'I' Ilk '''"^' t n.' "'"'^'^ "^^ genitive>.ZeW., adds , to the 

stem, Ike the nouns of Class II, and changes the last vowel of the 

er,''^ r://''"^ V- -'^ ^''^ '''^'^' ^'-■-^-' -^ -n 
stem iik. ,r ' n, ' 'r^^i^"' '"'"''' ^^^^ ^^^P ^^e final n of the 

hke Ckl V ^^^'f V^^^^^' f "•^'•^' --^"J n^any others, omit ^ before 
^ like Class V and change the final vowel of the stem, like Clasn 
VI. Corpus tempus, vrdnus, funus, &c., change the 1 ist vowel of ' 

cilT Vn """ "' '^"^ ^'^ ^^' ''''''^ ' ^- ^' ^''- ^ - 






FIRST LATIN READEH. 




(1.) Classes II. & VT. Judex 

(2.) - IV. & VI. llortxo 

(3.) - V. & VI. Miles 

(4.) - VI. & VII. Cor^m 

SlNODLAR. 

(1.) N. d: Voc. Jfldex, m., a judge. 
Oen. Judlc-is. 
Dat. Judio-i. 
Ace. Judic-em. 
AH. Judic-e. 



25 



(2.) N. ct Voc. "HJ&mo.m., a man {mankind.) 
Oen. Homln-is. 
Dat. Homin-i. 
Ace. Homin-em. 
Ahl. Homin-e. 

i^.) N.d^Vcc. mi^n, ax., a soldier. 
Gen. Millt-is. 
Dat. Milit-i. 
Ace. Milit-em. 
All. Milit-e. 

(4.) N. V. A Ace. Corpus, n., a body. 
Oen. Corp8r-is. 
Dat. Corpor-i. 
Abl. Corpor-«. 



(stem, Judic-), judic-is. 

(stem, homin-), komin-is. 

(steni^ mUit-), mUit-is. 

(stem, corpor-), corpor-is. 

Plural. 

Judlc-es, judges. 

Judic-um. 

Judio-ibus. 

Jndic-es. 

Judic-ibns. 



Homin-es, m,&i. 

Homin-um. 

Homin-ibus. 

Homin-es. 

Homin-ibus. 

Milic-ris, soldiers. 

Milit-um. 

Milit-ibus. 

Milit-es. 

llilit-ibus. 

Corp6r-a, bodies, 
Corpor-um. 
Corpor-ibus. 
Corpor-ibus. 



f~m 



.^.,. EXERCISE XI. . 

Pater datauSta pignora fflio S. I ^ ™ ??SS?tadmis. -£^^^v - 



/ 



— " ^"i-.y-ii. Duuinus est mort a inntrn p„nii„„ 

S^^^r Sj^^r " ''^'^ "^^- ^^Ses s 

horn mum nmtanf A TT '''^'' ^^^"^''^^- ^empora mores 

ommum mutant. Agncola laudat nemora et rura oppidi sui. 

The body of tho hnr.^l^„ ,%,";'-' ^^1 , 

eupply a shade to the^^emLZ t^ T^' ^"'*- ^'^^ ^^^^ 
to lueveary husbandmen. Anger supplies strength. 






I 



'•^•siSSSiSK^iSS 



SUB— .wiBiBBBiiPI 



26 



FIRST LATIN REAPER. 



^nZ ^'Tu '''*; ^5' '^^' ^''' "^'"'^ ^'^^ the summit of the 
mountam. The sides of the mountain are white with deep snow 
The father gives a great dowry to his beloved daughter. The sha«ie 
of the trees dehghts the husbandman weary with his work. The forces 
of the enemy were hastening through the forest. The flank of the 
enemy's cavahy was exposed. 



SECTION V. 

FOURTH DECLENSION. 

J;J^' T' '^•*^' ^'^^ Declension end, in the nominative, in 
-tM o^-«. Those m -^ are masculine or feminine, and those in -u 



Singular. 

N. ds V'tc. Fruct-iis, m., fruit. 
Oen. Fruct-U8. 
2>at. Fruct-ui. 
Ace. Fru3t-um. 
Abl. Fruct-u. 

^. V. ttAcc. 6en-u, n,, a knee. 

Oen. Gen-ua. 

Dat. Gen-u. 

Abl. Gen-u. 

iV. <fc Voc. D8miis, f., a house. 
Oen. Domus.* 
Dat, Domiii {rarely domo). 
Ace. Domum. 
Abl. Domd {ranly domu). 



Plural. 

Fruct-fls, fruits. 

Fruct-iium.' 

Fruct-Ibus. 

Fruct-U8. 

Fruct-ibui."^ 

Gen-ua, knees. 
Gen-uum. 
Gen-ibus. 
Gen-ibus. 

DoityilB, houses, 

Bomilum or domSrum. 

Somibus. 

Domos (rarely domus). 

Donubug. 



2. The following list contains those nouns which have usuallv 
-uims mstead of -ibus in the dative and ablative plural 



farais, acus, partus, quercus,Jicus, add, and anus,- 
\jribus, lo cus, specus, too ; with veru, pecu, paitui 



J 



• D-31M is ubtsU iu Uie sense of ••« hnmn." 



PJitST LATIN RJSADEK. 



27 



t^y^tBd 



■ he 







XtxKAC. EXERCISE XII. 
Agricolae laudant altas qScufi Aifo * ^^ 

Serous 8UDlkta.^Ua^aJir^^r Ssiiuj. ^raiit tuti. Ma Z*--^^ 
pairae. Ho«tium eqXtL e?.t ' ^^^ ^'"«"-e manus sunt -k«^.<^^ 

;/;, Naves mul^e stm^l prerii^ ^f^ ^«^^«^«t. 
c£Bd raraosa sunt a|W%/ """ ^°™:"* i^M laudat. Comua 

socr«inamat. ^^a^us tua est magna, fi^^a^ bona 

in-law. 4 NeptJe e^^l T'"" "*" '"^ *''™ <l«>8htcre- 

delight boTThelTvantf""' f °" »' «■« ^«^ Chariots 

temple are high. TheS ^l^t h^r ^'^ '!f''' °^ '"^ 
boys were swimmine toward! th^.h w '°*^" »'"''''"'- '-The 

i 



SECTION VI. 
^IFTH DECLENSION 

.-vhich is either nasculine or feminS in th. l ?"". '"'''" '''■''• 
■"'heptoal Theeo„p„„ndrSi!'':S;l':' """™"°^" 

-Singular. t, 

^ . Plural. 

Di-es, na. orf., o c^aj/. 

Dl-ei. 
Hat. LMi. 
•4«. Dl-em. 
4W. Di^. 



Gen. 



Dl-es, m., (iai/«, 

Di-erum. 

Di-ebus. 



Di-ebu8. 



28 



FIRST LATIN lUCADER. 



Sthoitlar, 

A^. <fc Voc. E-Ss, f., a thivg. 

Otn. E-Si. 

Dot. B-li. 

Ace. B-em, 

AU. B-e. 



Plural. 

B-es, things. 

B-erom. 

B-ebus. 

B-es. 

B-ibos. 



2. Dies and res are the only words of this declension which have ) 
jthe plural complete. TJieseyen nouns, acies, effigies Jacies, glacksyj 
ben^, species, and spes have the nominative and accusative plural // 
f but the others want the plural. ) 

3. (Syntax) Rule X.— The word indicating the point of timeu 
)at which anything occurs is put in the ablative. !) 

_ 4. The future indicative active of a verb of the First Conjugation ^ 
is declined as follows : — 



SiRQ. — Ain-5-bo, 

/ shaU love. \ 

Plur.— Am-a-bimus, 
We shall love. 



Am-a-bla, 

Thou wilt love. 
Am-a-bltis, 

You wiU love. 



Am-a-bit, 

lie wUl love. 
Am-a-bunt, 

They will love. 




C^ 



Spes victoriae mUites dql^-. Duces hostium.fiaeii'violabnnt. 
0^.i ^ ?"^'^^ meridiem miljtes ad magistratus festinanr l^ea dabit filio 
decoram caesariem. 'Acies hostiuin est longa. Pecunia est matenes 
.vA^"^.*"""^ "^feW-.w ?%t^ro die Caesar cum hostibus acie pugnat. 
f^^acies tauritteri.-^ M. Fortuna est domina humanarum rerum 
-i >:' Soror fidgi est justitia. Spii^ occasu Caesar aciem Gallorum mUitibus 
•^vf/v.' monstrat. Taurus pQctam comibus pulsat. Tauri contr& leones 
comibus pugnant. Cum hostibus patriae pugnabitis. '^.>^'':. 

On the following day Caesar routs'the enemy's cavalry with (ctm) 
great slaughter. Luxury is the source of many evils. At sunset 
Caesar's cavalry put to flight the army of the Gauls. The ice 
floats down the river. The father kept his promise. The boy's 
hopes wore vain. The arrival of her father will delight the girl 
Caesar will keep the promise which he gave (i.e., the promise given) 
to the army. The face of the girl was beautiful. Caesar was fight- 
ing with all his cavalry. At sunset the Britons rout the enemy's 
cavahy. The bulls were beating the doors with their horns. About 
sunset the enemy hasten towards the gates of the city. 



a-ci'M, -^■ 



t^ 



ft 



€L 



■U, 



/ .^^*». 



AM^' 



\f1* 



^ 



FFRSTTCATIN HEADER 



29 



SECTION VII. 
ADJECTIVES. 

1. Adjectives may be divided into three classes :- 

(1.) Those which have three forms-one for each gender- a. 

Zw""^- ^""' *^' ^^^^-^'^^ f°r the masculine and 
femmme m common, and one for the neuter : ^Z"t 

(3.) Those which have only one form for all genders • n, /.;• 
,ycc,«^, mm., jeLix, neut. ; «ar, masc. var f^m 

stantive. of theFira DedilT' *'''/i""°™ « d^'ined like sub- 
Ihose of the Second Th 1/ ' '°'^*! '""'™""» """J "^-''f "ke 
f.. like ,»«^a; ^i J!^ "^XC;' '°^""' '*' ''™"' *■«"■ 

<./.«; and rifnenmiiT T ^ T"' """^ '"»•> '^ declined like 

SiNOULAR. 

^'em- XT i 

«- Neut 

JS'^-a- Bon-um. 

Bon-ae. B^n-i. 

Jo^-a«- Bon-o. 

Bon-am. bq^.^ 



CLASS I._ 

Masc. 
^om. B5n-ns, good. 
Oen. Bon-i. 
■^^. Bon-o. 
Ace. Bon-um. 
Voe. Boa-e. 



-4W. Boa>«. 



Bon-a. 



Jfon-om. 
Bon-o. 




80 



N. 



FIRST LATIN READER, 



«* Voc. Bon-i, 
Otn. Bon-orum. 
-Do/. Bon-ig. 
Ace. Bon-08. 
AU. Bon-is. 



^' * Voe. T8ner, tender. 
Oen. Ten8r-i. 
J^at. Tener-o. 
Ace. TenSr-nm. 
Abl. Tener-o. 



^-'tVoe. Tener-i. , 
Oen. Tener-orum. 
J>at. Tener-ia. 
Ace. Tener-08. 
AU. Tener-iB. 



PliURAL. 

ftva. 
Bon-ae 
fion-arum. 
Bon-ia. 
fion-aa. 
Bon-ia. 

Singular. 
Ten8r-i. 
Tener-ae. 
Tener-ae. 
Tener-am. 
Tener-a. 

PlUlUL. 

Tener-ae. 

Tener-arum. 

Tener-ia. 

Tener-aa. 

Tener-ia. 



06..-Some adjectives are declined in the masculine 

-J^om. Niger Nigra, Nigrum. 
Gen- Nigri, ifigrae, Nigri, &«. 



Kent 

Bon-a. 

Bon-oram. 

Bon-ia. 

Bon-a. 

Bon-ia. 



Tener-nm. 

Tener-i. 

Tener-o. 

Tener-um. 

Tener-o. 



Tener-a. 

Tener-orum, 
Tener-ia. 
Tener-a. 
Tener-ia. 

^Qager; as,— 




y. <t Voe. 
Oen. 
Dot. 
Ace, 
Abl. 



CileT,Jleee. 

Celer-ia. 

Celer-i. 

Celgr-em. 

Celer-i.* 



^- V. A Ace. Celer-ea, 
Oen. Celer-um.f 
Dat. Celer-ibus, 
Abl. Celer-ibus. 



SiKOUlAR. 

CelSr-ia. 

Celer-ia. 

Celer-i. 

Celer-em. 

Celer-i. 

PlURAIi. 

Celer-ea. 
Celer-um. 
Celer-ibua. 
Celer-ibua. 



Cel8r-e. 

Celer-ia. 

Celer-i. 

Celer-e. 

Celer-i. 



Celer-a. 
Celer-um. 
Celer-ibua. 
Celer-ibua. 



• See notes • and t. p. 31 



1^- a:. 



FIRST LATIN READER. 



CLASS TL— 

Maic. 
y. <t: Voc. GrSv-ig, Jieavy. 
Oen. Grav-ig. 
J)at. Qrav-i. 
Ace. Grav-em. 
Abl. Grav-i.* 



^. r. J: Ace. Griv-es. 

Oen. Grav-ium.f 
Dat. Grav-ibua. 
Abl. Grav-ibua. 



31 



SlNOULAR. 

Fem, 
Grav-ia. 
Orav-ia. 
Grav-i. 

Grav-em. 
Grav-i. 

Plural. 

Grav-«8. 
Grav-ium. 
Grav-ibua. 
Grav-ibua. 



Kent 
Orav-«. 
Grav-ia. 
Grav-i. 
Grav-e. 
Grav-L 



Grav-Ia-t 
Grav-ium. 
Grav-ibua. 
Grav-ibua. 



^' <fe Voc. Grfivior, heavier. 
Oen. Gravior-ia. 
i>at. Gravior-i. 
Ace. Gravior-em. 
A bl. Gravior-e or-i.X 



SlNOriAR. 

Gravior. 
Gravi6r-i8, 
Gravior-i. 
Gravior-em. 
Gravior-e or ~%. 



^- V. d: Acc. Gravi6r-ea. 
Oen. Gravior-um. 
Dat. Gravior-ibua. 
Abl. Gravior-ibua. 

CLASS ITI..^ 

Jf. dc Voc. Par, equal to. 

Oen. Par-ia. 

Dot. Par-i. 

Acc. Par-em. 

Abl. Par-i.§ 



Plttraii. 

Gravi3r-e8. 
Gravior-um. 
Gravior-ibua. 
Gravior-ibua. 

SlNOULAE. 

Par.' 

par-ia.' 

Par-i. 

Par-em. 

Par-i. 



GraviuB. 
Gravidr-ia. 
Gravior-i. 
Gravlua. 
Gravior-e «• -i 



Graviflr-a. 
Gravior-um. 
Gravior-ibus, 
Gravior-ibua. 



Par. 

par-ia. 

Par-i. 

Par. 

Par-i. 



the genitive plural: an^if neSr have L rV"' "'""'^ "' "^"''^''^ '^""^ -«'« >" 
Butcon,paratlveshaveony.«ra;S o^'For e "^^^^ '" '^^ "°-'"-"ve plu^L 
pp. 46, 47. ' "'^ a. hor exceptions, see Schmltz's Grammar, 

t The ablative singular ends either In -« or .• n ^ 4„ „ 

.'„"■"■'■;/■""''"■"''-■" Deiong to Class 1)1 '' "i sua is.; io 



ff i 



32 



Maaa 
^- ^. <t-^<;c. Par-et. 
e'en. Par-ium, 
/>a<. Par-ibua. 
-4W. Par-ibu8. 






"RflT LATIN RRADER. 

Fern. 

Par-eg. 

Par-ium. 
Par-ibns. 
Par-ibus. 



IV. it 



Voc. rsiix, happy, 
Oen. Fellc-i«. 
-Oa<. Pelic-i. 
Ace. Felio-em. 
Abl. Felio-6 or -i. 



Felix. 
Pellc-ia. 
Felic-i. 
Pelic-em. 
Pelic-e or -i. 

Plural. 

Felic-es. 
Felic-ium. 
Felic-ibuB. 
Felic-ibus. 



Neirt. 
Par-la. 
Par-ium. 
Par-ibu8. 
Par-ibua. 



Pello-ia, 
Pelic-i. 
Felix. 
Felic-e or 4. 



Felic-ia. 
Felic-ium. 
Felic-ibua. 
Felic-ibuB. 



^- ^•'tAcc.TelicQa, 
Oen. Felic-ium. 
Dat. Felic-ibua. 
Abl. Felic-ibua. 

So, ^^ Sapiena, Sapiena. Sapiena. 

^«». Sapxeut.ia,Sapieut-ia.Sapient-ia,&<, 

PRESEKT. 

"^^■«-«' M«n-«-t, 

Thou art advising. ffei.L^. ■ 
Mon-e-tis. J*^ ^» advising. 

IMPERFECT. 

UoQ-e-baa. v 

TAott wert advising. He wn^ L ■ ■ 

Mon-e-batia, ' Mot-eTaut ""' 

rou^ere advising. Tke,.ereadvisir^, 



SiNa.-M|5n-e-o, 

/ am advising 
Pn7B.-.Kon-e-mua, 

^Vc are advising. 

SiNQ.— Hon-e-bam, 

I' was advising. 
ytvR. -Mon-e-bSmua, 

We were advising. 

81N0.— Mon-e-bo, 

I sliall advise. 

PiUB.-Mon-«.bImua, 

We shall advise. 



FUTURE. 
Kon-e-bia, 

Thou wUt advise. 
Mon-e-bitia, 

you will advise. 



Mon-e-bit, 

He will advise. 
Mon-§-bunt, 

Tluy will advist 



KIRST LATIN READEK. 



38 



IvLl 



BJan^ts dominus semim 'fidelem vocat! ""Servi fideles doniinos he- 
nignos laudabunt. Copiae Caesaris in apert,«n. caiupum l^Z^L A^kJ- 
Fess: nuhtes ^ ca^trafestinaba^ Cur ad M-^^^^T^^TZ^r^ZZ^ 

^^ doceb^t. ruellae et pucn magnam reginae coronam videbunt. Ferox j.J., 
..T^Uupus asjionj teneran. la^latai Leo agnum a^peris lacerat denS ^Uut^ 
aoC\Acer agricola ten^m vomere acuto lacerabit. Parvi puerf S 

^jnim ^njent Cur lupum times ? Regina pulchra in IZ^o ^^^ '^ 
ambulabat Tzmeo hostes et («;^) dona ferentes. Brevi te-^fe ^ 
hostes castra movent e campo. Cornua bovis sunt longa, 

m2'l'^ '""" ^^^^ ^"' father's Targe "cup. The active girls are 
fining he cup with leaves. The boys, along with their dear sister 
were filhng the cups with leaves. . The timid cows fear the f Je S 
The plough 13 heavy. The crow has black feathers.* ThereTe 
many tall oaks m the dense forest. The wise father has a fool^h 

I'river ' \t b'lr ^ '''' T 'nJf ' ^^^ '^^^ ^ '^^^^'^' ^^ 
the river The ball is round. The ball is smooth. The balls are 

m the farmer's house. Caesar's soldiera were brave. The horse^ 
men s spurs are sharp. 



SECTION VIII. 

SOME IRREGULARITIES OF DECLENSION. 
L SUJ3STANTIVES. 



JV. .fc Foe. 

Gen. 

Dat. 

Ace. 

AU. 
(122) 



SlNOULAR. 

Bos, m. or t',, an ox or cow. 

Bovis. 

Bov-i. 

Bov.ftm^ 

Bov-e. 

3 



Plural 

B5v-es, oxen. 

Bo-um. 

Bubas, or bobus. 

Bov-es. 

Babus, or bobus. 



34 




FIRST LATIN READER. 



SlNOULAR. 

N. <k Voc. JQpiter, m., Jupiter. 

Gen. J6v-i8. 

Dot. Jov-i, 

Ace. Jov-em. 

All Jov-e. 



Plural. 



N. I- Voc. 
Oen. 
Dot. 
Ace. 
AU. 



Sgnex,* m. or t, an old man 

Sen-is. [or woman. 

Sen-i. 

Sen-em. 

Sen-e. 



^om. Via, f., strength. 
Gen. (Vis, rare.) 

(Vi, rare.) 

Vim. 



Lat. 
Aec. 
Voe. 
Ahl. 



Vi. 



\ 



Sen-es, old men or women. 

Sen-urn. 

Sen-ibus. 

Sen-es. 

Sen-ibus. 

Vlr-es. 

Vir-ium. 

Vir-ibus. 

Vir-es. 

Vir-es. 

Vir-ibus. 



^. Respuhhcam^jusjurandum are compound words, res being 
written contmuously with the adjective publica, and y^ with thf 
gerundive future participle v^s.) jurandum. Each part of the 
compound takes Its own peculiar inflexion :- ^ 



Singular. 
N. ds Voc. Ees-public-a, f., a republic. 
Gen. Eei-public-ae. 
Dat. Eei-public-ae. 
Ace. Eem-public-am. 
Abl. Ee-public-a. 



Plural.— Ees-publicae, &«. 



Singular. 

Jus-jnrand-um, n., an oath, 

Juris-jurand-i. 

Juri-jilrand-o. 

Jus-jurand-um- 

Jure-jurand-o. 



3 Mx, fern, "snow," has the genitive niv-is, from which the 
other cases are regularly declined. 

i. In the Second Declension proper names in -im, and the two 
Common Nouns fihus and genius, make the vocative in -I, mstead of 
-«^ ; as, Appius, voc. Appi; filius, voc. Jill. 

5. Substantives in -ius and -ium occasionally made the genitive 
BiD^uIar m -t, instead of -u; as, oH for otii ^ 



.Senex In properly an a<yectiv& 



'11 



FIBST LATIN READEB. 



35 



nen or women. 



n., an oath. 



Masc. 
Kom. Un-as, owe. 
Oen. Un-Iu«. 
Dat. Un-i. 
Ace. Un-um. 
Voc. Un-e. 
Abl. Un-o. 



II. ADJECTIVES. 

SlNOULAR. 

_ ^^'^ Kent 

"°-a- TJn-um. 

Un-Iu8. xjn-Iua. 

Un-am. XTn-um. 

U^^-a- Un-um. 

Un-a. Un-o. 

7. But the common forms of such adjectives, viz., -i in the geni- 
tive, and -0 m the dative, are occasionally used by certain writers 
i ne -t of the genitive singular is usually long. 

8. In the same way are declined the follomng:— 

Nullus, nme. Nentor, ndther of two. 

Ullu8,a7iy. Vt^t, which of two. 

Totns, all, whoU. Aliua. one {of many.) 

Unus, on«. Alter, o«€ (o/ <wo), &c. 

9. The plural of these words is regular, like bonus. 

10. (Stn^ax) RtTLE XI.- Verbs and adjectives Mch signify 
TZr '' '^''''^^^^'"^'' ^^'''''' <^ unlikeness, are followed by 

[That is. adjectives and verbs which, in English, are followed bv "to " 
fS Thus v^L • T^"*?''''^^^ ^'''*' ""^^^ ^« ^°«« h^'-'" to tL' 

i/rt^ifU EXERCISE XV. .^^/^ .- 

Im leonis sunt ingentes. Senez fig^d^biKs annis et ^tXt"" 
Mdtormn senum capUli sunt cani. 5|minft^vis sunt ma ^ W,c^ /- 

pabulum bubus dabat^umter m.igna vi tonat. Agricolae omne 
Jovem magna voce .n^i#-In sepulchro pauper mi p^^esl Ucl. 
&£t^ est inimica virtutL Virtus civium est gZ^eMicJ* 
<^,!^^^^}^^y^^^r^^^^^i. Vires y^ J.^^^,, ^„. .^...,' 

^II!'.' ?!!^'**""^« •" «ft«" omitted in Latin, as in Enells'h'^.^^h« „.,„„..„„ ..:; " ' 

t But par sometimes governs the genitive. 



36 .„ 

OaU,ae „M™t Caesar. AJori* aivlt™ ^i in^eTZlZ^nr 

-•ickeJ dread JovetZ„W„T,f J'M'J^r w,th „„„,, ,„,,, „,, 
stall of the oxen with I' , ° ,' T ''""'"^' '""'"<*■ "'l' 'he 
equality w th t ,0 " rt • " ""' S'"™ ">» P"" "^^ »" «" 
The8la™,arepla t ri^'"' ""^ ''"'"' *° *» '"P'""!"- 

^Ho points ou?tr;;xr;i;it:nor:rr^^*- ^''^ 



In ■ 



' SECTION IX. 

COMPARISON OP ADJECTIVES 
C^'^V^^.Zr^^ZZ:: ^°-'-^»"-«" P»'tive, the 



POSITIVK. 

Clar-us, dear. 
Saev-us, cruel. 
Grav-is, heavy. 
lev-is, light. 



Comparative. 
Clar-ior. 
Saev-ior. 
Grav-ior. 
Lev-ior. 



Superlative. 
Clar-issimuB. 
Saev-issimus. 
Grav-issimus. 
lev-isaimuB. 



4. Exceptions: — 

Pulcher {stem pulchr-), /air. Pulchr-ior. 
Acer (<?m acr-), aAarp. Acr-ior. 



• LlteraUy, "there are to thT^o." .•. ...,,„,„. v 

— , — ,,, liie one iiasi 



Tener-rinms. 

Pulcher-rimus. 

Acer-rimns. 



PmST LATIN RKADER, 



37 



(^) fi« Adjectives, ending in -lU, take -limu. in the Suj^riative : 



Ficll-ii, easy. 
Gricll-ia, slmder. 
Hfimll-is, hw. 
Slmll-iB, like. 
Difflcil-ii, difficult. 
DiasimU-ii, wUikc. 



Facil-ior. 

Oracil-ior. 

Humil-ior. 

Simil-ior. 

Difflcil-ior. 

Biasimil-ior 



ScPERLATIVg, 

Paoil-limuB. 

Oracil-limai. 

Humil-limui, 

Simil-limua. 

Difflcil-limua. 

Biaaimil-limua. 



^^"■uiui-uuiua. 



POSITIVR. 

Mil2dlc-ua, abusive. 
Malefic-ua, vidous. 
MilSvdl-ua, Ulditpoted. 

Egen-ua, needy. 
Pr6vid-ua,/ome«nf7. 



COMPARATIVK. 

Maledicent-ior. 

Maleflcont-ior. 

Malevolent-ior. 

So also, — 
Egent-ior. 
Provident-ior. 



SUPERLATITB. 

Maledicent-iaaima*. 

Maleflcent-iasimus. 

Malevolent-iaaimus. 

Egent-Iaaimua. 
Provident-iaaimni. 



PnarmwrvB 



PoSITJYB, 

BSnua, good. 
Malus, bad. 
Maguua, great. 
Multua, mucK 
Parvus, amaU. 
Nequam, worthless. 
Senex, an old man. 
Juvlnia, a young man. 



CoMPARATIVa. 

Melior. 

Pejor. 

Major. 

Plus. 

Minor. 

Nequior. 

Senior. 

Jflnior. 



SUPKRLATIVE. 

Optimua. 
Peasimug, 
Maximua, 
Plurimus. 
Minimus. 
Nequissimua. 
Natu maximua. 
Natu minimus. 



6. A f« Adjectives have two forms in the Superlative ; a», 
Extgrus, bei7ig outside. 



Infgrua, being under. 
Posterns, being behind. 

~^r''^'^a, uctng above. 



Exterior, (mtcr. / ^xtremus, (sometimes 

^a;. lacei . 1 lorn ^y,^^ j^^ ^^ 

\ thcr's death. 

Supmor. A^Aer. i time); aummu«, the 
V highbst. 



38 



FIRST LATIN READER, 



7. A few have no proper Positive, but the positive stem appears in 
adverbs or other indeclinable words ; as,— 



POSITIVH StbM. 

(Ante, before.) 
(Citi-a, on thia side.) 
(De, down.) 
{Intra, within.) 
(w/fj/s, awi/t.) 
(Pria, or prae, before.) 
(Props, near.) 
(Secus, otherwise. ) 
(Ultra, beyond.) 



Comparative, 

Anterior. 

Citerior. 

Deterior, 

Interior. 

Ocior. 

Prior. 

PrSpior. 

Sequior, (n. sequins or 

Ulterior. 



SUPKKLATIVK. 

CItlmuB. 

Detexrimus. 

Intlmus. 

Ocissimas. 

Primus. 

Prozimus. 



[sflcius.) Ultimus. 



8. (Syntax) Rule Xll.-Tke comparative degree goverm ttve 
abtative of the object with whixih comparison is instituted : as, Dulcior 
\n%\\Q, sweeter than hoi^y ; FUia pulchrior matre, a daughter more 
beautiful ttian leer mother. 




1 i 



^Vvvv/ 



hx<-i 



i 



,r/ 



id 



., EXERCISE m 

4uram gravius est argento. Amentum vilius est auro, virtutibua 
aurum. Tuiius Hostilius ferocior M<t^omulo. Puella pulchrior est 
pulchra matre. :SM est praestantius virtute. Nemo Romanorura 
doquentior erat Cicerone. Lupi ferociores sunt quam* canea 
Monesto {to the honourable man) carior est fides, quam pecunia.'^it 
Equus est celerior quam canis. Magujter est doctissi^ omnium. 
Unus erst eravissimnm. TTifimA ^\Ja w>„,-^>„„ „„_i. _ Z^i 



pecunia;!^***'^-' 
Onus erp,t gravissimum. Hieme djS b^eviores sunt quam nocC*^-- 



Kc.aam, urbem Ttaliae cIarissimam,laudabatpoeta. FUius maior A- , 
estpatre. ^ob^ri parentibus sunt §imillimi. FHia pulchra pulch- V 
emmae matri est siraiUiraa. Luna minor est terra. Sol est max^ ^^.. 
imus planetarum. Caesarera, et mum fortissimum, et imperatorem ' 
suramum, laudabunt posteri. (Qhfa'Sst ocior ventis.' 'Tortus erat 
oelebemraus. Juvenis erat nequissimus omnium aequalium. Hostes 
extremum oppidura Sequanorum oppugnabant. Hieme pauperes 
sunt egentissimi. Senem sapientissimum omnes amant. Gloria 
populi Romani erat summa in re militari. 



• Wl.eu qmu^_ '■uiai.,- i» ^pressed, tbe second oub,u«uye 
m caae. 



agrees witii Uie iirst 



im appears in 

trPRRLATIVK. 

tlmus. 

JteiTimus. 

tlmus. 

issimas. 

imua. 

ozimus. 

timus. 



FIRST LATIN READER. 



89 



The boy was wiser than his eister. The work was very ea^v 
The .vorks were veiy difficult. The girl was veiy na^ghr Z 
Bons were n.ore fortunate than their parents. Th7girl is mo e slen 
der than her brother. Dogs are more sagacious thf^cl In the 
SdiT r!"; --,^^--t apples. The peacock's tail sve:^ 
splendid In the forest beside the river there were veiy many ponlZ 
trees. The queen is the most wretched of all womeS^ The brid^« 
IS broader than the road. The lion's teeth are vl^ stlg Co2a 
was the oldest of the sistei.. The crane has a ve^ W Lk fa 
often dread the smaUest evils. '^'^^J' ^ong necK. Men 



ffovems the 
' as, Dulcior 
tff/Uer more 



, virtutibua 

iilchrior est 

lomanorum 

m* canes, 

a pecunia^»«**'«— ' 

s omnium, 

im nocl^ ' '^ 

ilius major /u, / 
bra pulch- ^^ 

est mas-r,^.^ c,jJit^ 
iperatorera 
'6rtus erat 
t. Hostes 

pauperes 
Gloria 



i^itb tiie tirst 



SECTION X 

THE NUMERALS. 

^- i^orunus,8eep,35. ^^^nas. 



Masc. 
JVom.. Dfi-o. 
Gen. Du-6rum. 
Dat. Du-6bus. 
■Ace. Du-6s. 
Abl. Du-obus. 

CAEDINAL8, 

1. Unus, una, un- 

um, one, 

2. Duo, duae, duo. 

3. Tres, tres, t ^ 

4. Quatuor. 
6. Quinque. 

6. Sex. 

7. Septem, 

8. Octo. 
y. KSTem. 

10. Dfcwa 



Fem. 
Du-ae. 
Du-arum. 
Du-abus. 
Su-as. 
Du-abus. 



ORDIKAL8. 

riim-u8, a, um, flrst. 

i Sgcund-us, a, um, or 
t alter. 
Tertiua. 
Quaitus. 
Quill tus. 
Sextus. 
Septimus. 
Octavns, 
NCnns. 
D«cimua 




Fern. 
Tres. 
Trium. 
Tribus. 
Tres. 
Tribus. 



Nent, 
Tria. 
Trium. 
Tribus. 
Tria. 
Tribus. 



DISTBIBCTIVES. 

f Slnpfill, ae, a, ) 
( one each time. | 

Binl, ne, a. 

Terni, or trlnl. 

QuSternl 

Qninl. 

SCnl. 

Septgnl. 

OctonL 

NfiTSnL 

Dfini. 



MDWIPUCA- 
T1TE8 (ADV.) 

SSmel, onofc 

BiB. 

Tgr. 

QnSter. 

Quinqniea. 

Sexies. 

Septies. 

Octles. 

Nfiyiea 

I>eciee. 



I 



40 



FIfiST LATIN READE2, 



I '"J 



C'ASDIHALS. 

U. UndSclm. 

12. DuodSclra. 

13. Tr6(18clm. 

14. Quatuordecira. 

15. Quindecim. 

16. Sedeclm. 

17. Septendecim. 

18. DuodSTlgintL 

19. UndevlgintI, 

20. Vffflntl. 

21. Vigintiunus. 

22. Vlglntl duo. 



ORDINALS. 

UndScimua 
Duodecimus. 
Tertlus declmus. 
Quartus declmus. 
Quintus decimus. 

Sextus declmui 

Septimus decimus. 

DuodCncSsimus. 



DISTRIBUTITJBS. 

UndSnL 
DuodSnL 
Terni dCnL 
Quatemi denL 
Quini deni. 

Seni denL 

Septeni denL 



UtaTIPUOA- 
TIVE8 (ADT.) 

Undgclea 

Duodficieai 

TerdCcies. 

Quaterdecics. 

Quinqulesdecieii 
( Sexiesdecies, or 
\ sedeciea 

Septiesdecies. 



4 »>...„ .ji^i^i iv^ouci^ica, 

f Octoni denL or Octlesdecies, or 
I duodevicenL duodevicies. 

Undevicesimus. ^ NdvSul deni, or Noviesdecies, or 

Vicgslmus. 

Unus et vlccsimus. 



( undevicenL undevicies. 

Vicies. 



VlcenL 
Vlceni sinifulL 



) Alteretvicesimus. or ) ,^ 

\ vicesimuseecundus. ] ^''^^°' •»""' 

( Tricesimus, or til- ) ^ , 

( gesimus. / TrlcgnL 



nn-^ 
itum \ 



Quadrageslmus. 

(^uinquagesiruus. 

Sexagesimus. 

Septuagesimua. 

Octogesiraus. 

Nonagesimus. 

Centesimust 



QuadragSiiL 

QuinquagenL 

SexagenL 

SeptuagenL 

OctogenL 

NonagenL 

CentenL 



Centeslmuft primus. { ^^"'eni 
( ulL 



30. Triglnta. 

40. QuSdrSginta. 
50. Quinquaginta. 
60. Sexaglnta. 
70. Septuaginta. 
80. Octogirita. 
90. NOnaginta. 

100. Centum. 

101. Centum et 
ns, or cent 
nnui. J » — 

102. Centum et duo. Centesimnssecundus Centenl blnL 
S'?". .■*'''^ ^'icentesimus. DacenL 
800. TrficentL ae. a. Trecentesimus. TiecenL 
400. Quadnngentl, ) 

ae, a. \ Quadnngentesimus. QuadrlngenL 

600. Quingentl,ae,a. Quingentesimus. QulngenL 

600. Sexceut., ae. a. Sexccnteslmus. SexcenL 

700. Septingeiiti, ae, ) „ 

g^ > Septlngenteslmus. 

800. Octingenti, ae, ) „ 

a_ > Octingenteslmus. 

900. Nongenti, ae, a. Nongenteslmus. 

"- I2XX' *^'"®' Millesimus. 

2000. Duo mlllia, or \ „ 

bis mllle. / ^" mlllesimna. 

tnSffi ?""'"" """'■"• ^^"^'^s niUleslmus. 
1U0,000. Centum mlUia. Centiea millealians. 



Seintl et Ticies 
Bis et vicies 

Triciea, 

Quadraglcs. 

Quinquagiea 

Sexagles. 

Septuagies. 

Octogies. 

Nonagies. 

Ceuties. 



SeptlngenL 

OctlugenL 

NongenL 
Singula mlllia. 

Blna millla. 

Dena millla. 
Centena millla 



sing. Ceil ties et 
semeL 

Centies et bis, 

Ducenticii. 

Trecenties. 

Quadrlngentlee 

Quingentiee. 
Sexcenties. 

Septingentiea 

Octlngenties. 

Non gentles. 
Millies. 

Bis millies. 

DeclM mlllles. 
Centies milliea 



For other NwnxeraU, see Granwuxr. 



i 



f 3*1 



) 



KXTVttfUOA- 
TIVE8 (adv.) 

JndScies. 
>uodficieSi 
erdficiea. 
uaterdecici 
iiinqulesdeciea 
Bxiesdecies, or 
sedeciea 
jptiesdecies. 
ctiesdecies, or 
duodevicies. 
Jviesdecies, or 
undevlcies. 
Icies. 
niel et Tlcies 

i et vicies 

Iciei 

adragics. 

inquagiea 

lagies. 

)tuagiea. 

togies. 

n»iries. 

itie& 

ifies et 
3meL 

ities et bi& 

ienticii. 

Jenties. 

dringetiMec 

igentiea. 
:eotiea. 

ingentiea. 

ngenties. 

gentles. 

es. 

lillies. 

''i miUles. 

ica milliea 



n 



( 



FIE8T LAXm HEADER. 

SECTION XI. 

THE PRONOUNS 

I. SUBSTANTIVE OR PERSONAL PRONOUNS. 



SiNQULAB. 

SPera. 
TQ, thou. 

, <^ VI jor aice. ol^i, to or for himadf, 
Te, thee. 



\ 1 Pera 

j Nom.tgo,!, 
Gen. mUofme. 



9 Ten. 
^^i, of him^filf, ,t-c. 



Ace. Me, me. 
Voe. 



S§, hiimdf, he^-adf, 
itseif. 



i :;ri'^'^'°»' «. ■^*. ^"•. '*». u,^u^,.^.. 

PiURAL. 

A'ow. N8s, we, ««« 

Gen. Nostri, or nostrum Velf "' """; ' 

Z>-. N5MMoor/..^. V6;isXor/..,o. SIM, .. or /. .;^.. 

roc. — L ;?'' ^'^' Se, /AemcZre,. 

"t'r-^^- T;r-^'- -•-./-,-. 

*^-' 2'<«'- themselves. 

principal clame Wh^. !' ' T.'*'""' *" "'« '"''J^'t of the 

". ">, m; ate. iU„.. iiL^ . ™ I,. ° .^''P'*'^™ ""y «ie proper case of 
« the substantive pro„;„; of S'SoT' "' '"' "' ^ """' "^ 



42 



FIRST L.VTIN READER. 



I- If 



tl. ADJECTI7E PRONOUNS. 
3. (r.) The Possessive Pronouns are formed from the r.er8onal« 

masculine m'! ' ■ ^ ^' ^'^* ^^ "^^ ^^^^^^^^ ^^"S^^^r 

used ^^^i'^emnh^?'"'"'' ^^'^^^^ ^^'^^ "^^^^'" ^^^"gh sometimes 
Xl orT « ^/T"^ P™""' ^^ S^"^^^"y ^"^<^b^d to other 

Singular. 



Masa 
iVbffi. Ipse, 
e'en. Ipsius. 
Dat. Ipsi. 
^ cc. Ipsum. 

Voc. 

Abl. Ipso. 



Fem. 
Ipsa. 
Ipsius. 
Ipsi. 
Ipsam. 



Neut 
Ipsum, self. 
'Ipsius. 
Ipsi. 
Ipsum. 



Ipsa. Ipso. 




Pltjral. 

Fem. 
Ipsae. 
Ipsarum. 
Ipsis. 
Ipsas. 



Neut 
Ipsa. 
Ipsorum. 
Ipsis. 
Ipsa. 



Ipsis. Ipsis. 



speaker, or to what has been mentioned farther back :- 



Singular. 
Masc. Fem. 

Mm. Hie. Haec. 

Oen. HajuB. Hujus 

■Do*. Huic. Huic. 

Ace. Hunc. Hano. 

Voc. 

Abl. H5c. Hac. 



*», 



Nom. Ille. 
Oen. niius. 
Dat. Illi. 
Ace. Ilium. 

Voe. . 

AhL Illo. 



Ilia. 
Illius. 
Illi. 
lUam. 

lUa. 



Neut 
Hoc, this. 
Hujus. 
Hoio. 
Hoc. 

Hoc. 

lUud, that. 
Illius. 
Illi. 
Illud. 

Illo. 



Maso. 
Hi. 

Horum. 
His. 
Hos. 

His. 



Plural. 

Fam. 
Hae. 
Harum. 
His. ■ 
Has. 

His. 



Neut 
Haec 
Horum. 
His. 
Haec. 

His. 



Illi- like. Ilia. 

Illorum. lUarum. Illorum 

Illis. Ulis. iiiis. 

Illos. Iiias. Ilia 



I V«1 ! _ 

i i.i.ilS. 



nils. 



Illis. 



i Si 



ij 



FIRST LATIN READER. 



43 



6. Iste utaisttcd, <'that of yours," has reference to the second 
person. It is declined like zlle, ilia, illud. 

7. h, taid, "the person or thing before mentioned " is more of 



Maac. 
Kvm. Is. 
Om. Ejus. 
Bai,. Ei. 
Ace. Eum. 

Voc. 

AU, Eo. 



Singular. 
Fern. NeuL 



Ea. 

Ejas. 

Ei. 

Earn. 

Ea. 



Id, this {fiere). 

Ejus. 

Ei. 

Id. 

Eo. 



Plural. 
Masc. Fem, 

li- Eae. 

Eomm. Earum. 
lis or eis. lis, eis. 
Eos. Eas. 



Kent 
Ea. 

Eorum. 
lis, eis. 
Ea. 



lisoreis. lis, eis. lis, eis. 



the .^r:^""' '""' "'"= '"'"^•" " -"^^ "P «' «. -. ^, and 



Masc 
^om. Idem, the aame. 
Gen. Ejusdem. 
Dat. Eidem. 
Ace. Eundem. 

Voc. . 

Abl. ESdem. 



Singular. 

Fem. 
E&dem. 
Ejusdem. 
Eidem. 
Eandem. 

Eadem. 



Neut 
Idem. 
Ejusdem. 
Eidem. 
Idem. 

ESdem. 



Jfom. Hdcm. 

Gen. Eorundem. 

I>at. lisdem or eisdem. 

Ace. Eosdem. 

Voe. - — 

AU. lisdem or tisdem. 



PluraIi. 

Eaedem. 
Earundem. 
lisdem, &c 
Easdem. 

lisdem, &c. 



£&dem. 
Eorundem. 
lisdem, Sco. 
Eadem 

lisdem, &c. 



J^J7'^ '^° ?°',''''™ ''""""■' ?"'■' P"^' !?'«"'> "who," "which " 
«fe« to a noun (called the « antecedent") ii a foreg„i„» clausT t4 

bekgatta^hedrtw:;:^'^*"*' ^'' '^' ''' "^^ -""••«"' 




¥ I 



44 



rinsT LATIN READER, 



SlirODLAR. 
>f"c Fem. Neut 

l^om. Qui. Quae. 

Gen. Ctyus. CujuB 

iMt. Cui. Cui. 

Act. Quern. Quam. Quod 

Voc. • . 

Abl. Quo. Qua. 



Qu5d. 
Cujus. 
Cui. 



Quo. 



PlURAt. 

Masa Fem. Neut 

Qui. Quae. Quae. 

Quorum. Quarum. Quorum. 

Quibus. Quibus. Quibuj. 

QuoB. C,.v Huae. 

Quibus. Q.i J. QuibuB. 



WHO, which, what, differs but slightly from tlio Relative :-. 

Plural. 

»f(wc Feia Kent 

Qui. Quae. Quae. 

Quorum. Quarum. Quorum. 

Quibus. Quibus. Quibus. 

Quos. Quas. Quae. 

Qu'hus. Quibus. Quibui. 



SlNQULAR. 

JIaac. Fem. Kent 

.Vom. Quis. Quae. Quod or quid, 

Oen. Cujus. Cujus. Cujus. 

Dot. Cui. Cui. Cui. 

Ace. Quem. Quam. Quod or quid. 

Voc. ■ .^ . 

Abl. Quo. Qua. Quo. 



.a'tL ShC' '"'"• "" °"'" ^"'^"''Sative, U aeelinod exactly 

one," "any one/' ded X CnCS '"r " ""^' "^"™° 
?«orf or a%M,a, "son,e7ne°' «w7 '■I'l^'^, "Itqua, <,li- 

?».-*fa«,.U%=rki„o„^.T^„e'not";trt:^"'' ''"''*'"' »' 
,-.»,^«<',^ « rtosofv^rS. r Oberv'^rn-'""™"*'"' 



SiNQ.— Sum, Zawt. 
Pi-UR.— Sumus, we are. 



jEs, ^Aom ari. 
Estis, 2/ou are. 



Est, /te M. 
Sunt, t/iey are. 



quem lauda., est fortis ; Mulieies, quas vides ^vlZlZnt ^A^^'^^^ 
quae cantn. sunf n«„„ ' ^ *- ' g^«*cUes sunt ; Carnium. 



WEST LATIN READER, 



4& 






'i^-.J 



«» 7 in. »yv"- 

Pater mens te amat. Soror ftia mihi rln^nf »,- 
• ^liles quern laudas fidem non^^T^n ^''^^^^^^^SailDa.' 

puguatk Cui coenam paras ! Om,I If f " vobiscum 

Milites q™ lauda. j^Zdo nt stat XIT *°'^'""' 
uivocabis? * ^^j™ deoram non 

JtrhKreharTvTr'"^"^.'"*'"^^^^ ^^^ 

Those /ave. ^ill'^J^,^: InXlLXTntr" 
Wat was the caie^' the w^ r m T.' '"' """' """8»- 

• The syllable me/ "gpifM. «« j.^ , ^ '^ 

Pronoun^ to n^ak^hemtore emS^ti' 5t , ° ? T"^"* ^" ^^ t^^^ Personal 

proaoun.soth.tthetwofonnTerra;'^;t:;rr^r^^." '" "t^chedtothe 

. "o, wmn, tecum, nobuoutn, vcbitcum, Ac 



i>^; 



'£d 



1 



4G 



FIRST LATIN READER. 



SECTION XII. 



t 



3. 
4. 



THE VERB. 

tion atut 1^^^^^^^^^^^ '' '''''' ^'^^^ ^^ -^ ^ -^e an .ser- 
2. Verbs are divided into two cla^sses, according to their meanin?,- 
(1.) Transitive, m which the action or feeling is represented 
aspassm^ over to some object ; as, I strike the doq ■ 
He loves hu father. 
(2.) iNTRANaiTivE, in which (a) the action or feeling is repre- 
sented aa not passing over to an object, but as confined 
to the subject; as, / run, I walk, I reflect: or in 
which {b) a state or condition is expressed : as, / am 
I stand, Ifejoice. ' 

Verbs have two voices-the Active and the Passive 
The forms of the Active Voice indicate that the subject of the 
sentence represents the doer of the action expressed by the verb • as 
J he hoy strikes the dog. ' ' 

5. The forms of the Passive Voice indicate that the subject of 
the sentence represents the object of the action expressed by the verb • 
ns. The dog is struck hy the hov ' 

and rSivf '°" ''"'^^-^"^-*-' Subjunctive, Imperative, 

7. Besides these there are three other forms, which partake partly 
of the nature of the verb, and partly of that of the noun : (1 ) The 
s^A I2V in/ ""'\'^ «di«««ve,-a., aman., declined like 
iZZJ-l' ^' ^l^ f^^^i^rus, -a, ^m* like bonus, -a, -urn- 
(2.) The Supme, which is a verbal substantive of the Fourth De 
dension, having an accusative and an ablative case: and (3.) The 
Gerund, which is a verbal substantive. ^ ^ 

■8. Tense meam time. Verbs have six Tenses. Three of thesP 
he Present Perfect, and Future, are called ^4rorir; 
tenses as they represent the three great divisions of time the preT 
ent^ the past, and the future. The other three, the Imperfect Pin 
perfect, andFuturePerfect, are ca lled secondar; tenses 'tS Perfect 

• The student will observe, in the Table of the Vprh th«t i,. *^. . . 
thepartiCple of p«^ «^ „ wanting. ThVdefect ]! TIISh t'HL^?}':!':^'.^ 
El,u.uvc acsoiute. 07 oy a relative clause, introduced usually by 'i^^r '' "" ""= 



FIRST LATIN READER. 



47 



tke an asser- 

' meaning;, — 
represented 
he the dog; 

ig is repre- 
as confined 
led: or in 
; as, / am, 



ject of the 
e verb ; aa, 

subject of 
jr the verb ; 

mperative, 

ake partly 
: (1.) The 
;lined like 
-a, -um: 
)urth De- 
. (3.) The 

of these, 
r leading 
the pres- 
fect, Plu- 
le Perfect 

itlye Voice, 



Tense serves not only as a proper Perfect, I have written, but also a* 
an Indefinite (aorist) Tense, / wrote. 

9. Three tenses, the Present, Imperfect, and Future, represent 
an action a^ incomplete ; and three, the Perfect, Pluperfect, and 
h uture Perfect, represent it as completed. 

10. There are two Numbers, Singular and Plural ; and three Per- 
sons m each Number. 

^ 11. Verbs are divided, according to their stems and inflexions, 
into four classes, called Conjugations, which are distinguished by tlie 
termination of the present infinitive; thus,— 

I. The First Conjugation haa -arg, as ftmarg, to love 

IV. The Fourth . . . -i,.g, as audirS, to hear, 

12. The stem of amar. is, properly speaking, ama-; of mon^e, 
mone-;m^oiaudire audi-; but for convenience in conjugation 
and for the purpose of avoiding confusion, the four classes are printed 
uniformly as if the stem of each ended in a consonant,- J, as if 
am. were the stem olamare, mon- of mon,re, and and- of avdire, 
as Leg- is of legSre. ' 

13. While atna- as seen in the present imperative, is the primary 
and proper stem of the whole verb, it will be found advantageous^ 
the verT "L.^^^^^r^^^^^^ ^^ems appearing in different tenses of 

he verb Thus, while ama- or am- is the stem of all presents and 
imperfects, amav- (perfect) may be taken a. a second^ stem run- 
mng through all the perfects and pluperfects ; and am«/, occuirin. 

,7m? ^''^"'' participles, and future subjunctives. 
J.:-' J? ^^J\^^^^^^ parts of the verb, which exhibit all the 

tive, perfect indicative, supine, and present infinitive. These are 



48 



FIBST LATIN UKADKR. 



Ill 



INBIOATIVR. 



SECTION XIII.-REGULAR 

ACTIVK 

Principal Parts— Amo. Amfivi, 



rUKS—d love, or I ar^ loving, Ac.) 
S. Axn-o, Am-as, Am.&t 
' £;_^g ^mQ», Am-atla , Amant 

JI/P£RF.~a was lovliiK, &^) 

a. Am-JSUm, Am-fibS,,. Am-ahilt 
f. Am-ttl)aina8, Am-iibatls, Am- 
abant 



SCDJUNOTIVK. 



(1 nmy lovn, or I may bo loving, &a) 

Ara-em, Am-gs, Am-et 
Am-§mua. Am-gtis, Am-ent 



FUT.~{\ shall or will lovo, or bo loving, 
Ac) 

S. Am-ibo, Am-ftblsMm-ablt 

P. Am-abimfis, Am-abl«8, Am- 
ibant 



(I "ilKl.t, could, would, or should be 
loving, Ac.) 
Am-an-in, Am-Sros, Am-firct 
Ainaromus, Am urotis, Amirent 



/•JPi?/-..-! have loved, Ac., or I lo"vcd,"Ac) 
S. Aaav-i, Amav-isti, Amav-it 

P. Amav-ImuB, Amav-istia, Am- 
ftv-grunt, or ere 



PLUPERF.-{1 had loved, Ac.) 

S. AmSv-gram, Amav-6ras, Am- 

ttv-lrat 
P. Amav^ramns, Amav^ratis, 

Amfiv-grant 



(I moy be about to love, Ac) 

AmatQrus sim,' Amaturiu ala, 

Amaturus sit 
Amaturi simus, Amaturi ritii, 

Amaturi aint 

(1 may have loved, Ac) ' 

Amav^rim, Amav-lria, Amav 
grit 

Amay^rimus, Amav-grftia, Am- 
av-grint 



(I might, could, would, or should 
have loved, Ac) 

Amav-issem, Amav-isses, Amkr. 
is.set 

Amav-issejnus, Am&v-iaaetis, Am- 
av-issent 



FUT. PERP.~a shall have loved, Ac) 
S. AmSv-cro, Amav-^ris, Amav- 

ent 
P. Amav-grtmus, AmSv-Srttis, 

Amiv-grint 



SUPINEa. 

1st, Amat-um, to love. 
2d, Ama-tu, to be loved. 



• The pupU wlU refer to verb 



JUm. ftooMnn vim 



EGULAR 




bo loving, &C.) 
l-et 

Am-ent 

I, or shoiilil be 
> 

Am-iirct 
lis, Am-arent 



love, 4c.) 
uaturua sla, 
laturi iltii, 

«, Ac) 

ris, Amftv 

•Srftig, Am- 

or should 

) 

sea, Atn&v. 

isaetis, Am- 



■ % 



VERBS— FIRST CONJUGATION. 

VOICB. 

Ainatum, Amare, to love. 



4Qi 



IMPKUATIVK. 
(Lovo thou, Ac) 

—1 Am-a 
—, Am-&t6 



INFINITIVR. 



(Tolo^o.) 
Am-&re 



PARTIOIPtl. 



(Loving.) 
Am-an«, -ans, -an» [&c. 
Am-aQti8,-anti8,-antit 



Clhou Shalt love, Ac.) 
-, Am-ftti), Am-Ato 

-, Am-&t6te, Am- 
anto 



(To be about to love.) 

Am&t-flrtim*) 

^nram > esse 

urum ) 

[See Put. Participle.] 



(To have loved, Ac ) 
Am&v-isse 



(About to love.) 

Am&t-tlrus, -nri 
Amat-ura, -orae 
Amat-arum, -uri, ko, 
[Prom stem of supine.] 



^ec. Amand-um, hving. 
Otn. Amand-i, of loving. 



OKRUND. 

Dat. Amand-o, to or for loving. 

401. Amaiid-o , hy,from, or in lonng. 



1122; ^ 






II 



II 



I 



; 



\ 
















60 



"B3T LATIN RRADBR. 



At , 



'EOULAR VERBS.- 

PASSIVJ! 

Principal PARTS^Amor, Amatus 



IWDIOATIVlt. 



PRES.—(l am loved, Ac.) 
8. Am-or, Am-irl« (or -ire), Am- 
itfir 

P. Am-amur, Am-ftmini, Am- 
antur 



B^BJOWOTIVB. 



(I may be loved, Ac.) 
Am-«r, Am-grii (or -ere), Am- 
Stur 

Am^mur, Am-8mlnl. J»jn-entur 



fUPERF.-d waa [belnR] loved, Ac.) 



Am-£batur 

P. Am-abamur, Am-abSnifnl, An. 
Sbantur ' 



Am-£batur ' ^'' ^""^rer, Am-4reris (or -Srere) 

R Am-sKa~.,. A__. Am-aretur ^ ^'' 



PUT.~(X sliall or will be loved, 
Ac) 
S. Am-ibor, Am-ab?rig, (or 

-ab»re), Am-ablti^ 
P. Am-ablmur, Am-abWni, Am- 

abuutnr 



Am-aretur 

Am-Sremur, Am-5remlni, Am- 
irentur 






PERF.~(,l waa, or I have been, loved, 

Ac.) 

S. Amat-us (-a, -um) sum, Amat- 

M 88, Amat-us esi 
P. Amat-i (^e, -a) siimuB, Amat-i 
«»'i«, Amat-i aunt 



(I may have been loved, Ac.) 

Amat-us (-a, -urn) lim, Amat-u. 

sis, Amat-us sit 
Amat-i (-ae, -a), simus, Amat-i 

Mtis, Amat-i sint 



i»i07'^iZ/'._(I had been loved, Ac.) rimi ^. v 

8. AmSt-us gram, Amat-us e>^ J^'f*°"»>ould have been loved. Ac.) 
Amat-us, erat ^^as, AmSt-us essera, Amat-us esses, 

P. Amat-i erSmus, Amat-i erStis At^f "' 'f'"' 

Amat-i erant «''«*'«. U mat-, essSmus, Amat-i essetis, 

. ^ ____^^ I '^'"**"' essent 

FUT. PERP.-^ ahall have been loved, 
Ac) 

S. Amat-us gro, Amat-us ens. 
Amat-ua erit ' 

P. Amat-i erfmus, Amat-i erltis. 
Amat-i erunt 



• It wm be observed that in thf Pawlve 



'""^•'^tt^iUi^^Mi 



WltlwiiVi 



rmar lattn khadfti. 



61 



ERBS.- 

PASSIVR 
', Amatiis 

B. 

Ac.) 

-ere), Am- 
^jn-enttu* 

oved, Ac.) 
(or -arere), 

ntni, Am- 



PIRST CONJUGATION. 

VOICB. 

Bum, Amari, to be loved. 



IMPKRATIVl. 



(Be thou loved, Ac.) 
-, Am-&re 

-, Am- &mlnl 



INflHITIVB, 



(To be iored.) 
Am&.ri 



1— 



PARTIOIPLI. 



(Thou (halt ba loved, 
Ac.) 

— , Am-itor, Am-ator 

-, Am-iblmlni, Am- 
&ntor 



(To be about to be loved, 
Ac.) 

Axnit-oin Iil 



(Deaerving or requiring to 
be loved.) 

Am-andns, -anda, 

-andum 
Am-andi, -andae, 

-andi, kc. 





/, 



'^iti^ 



i 



1. (5(TNTAx) l^TTT.w XIV - I>,7m o/.^fw,,;, r/^.^^rm^, «n</ /a-l:,'m, 
rr;m;/, y,„mi </,<• rAi</,r ^r^VA M^ rrt^c^mr/tt,,... a.t, Poeta dat carinina 
rt^ijinao, //*<? ;w< y/,v., ,w.w /o </,^ 9,,,^; Pucr rem otinieni patri 
uulioayit, t/,c hot, ,hchtrfti the whole matter to hu father. 

2. Tho iiulioath^ mood is used U^ stato facta. 
n. TIio Ruhjunotivo ruo(vl is Jiscd to expross what is concciyed 

n,s possible, or oontitigcnt 0.1 cirotinistancos. It is often used for the 
iiiiporative, especially in the present tenso. 

EXERCISE XVIII. 

r;u.tor parat insidin. hipo. ruellac, qna^ kudas, a,l mediam noc 
ton) .aUnbant. Aqnilac volabnnt ad Wa.^ 'Agricola ctim servis 
Mils ooenavorat. llostes sih.ts ■.Wffe^pnpavcr^nit. Pater mens i,l 
enraverat. Vos fo^aycratis ; ego bdu.«^vi. gi hostes ocenpaverint 
s.lva., nostros ecnntos i'^x\<, fngahunt. I'ueri, paccntes (^n.atfl. Si 
qnis rem .n.ogistrat.ti indloavcrit, mercedem hniJtVkbit' 'mkgnani. , 
Omnos servi paneni hru^eris portabant. Pneri, pilas secnm portSlntcs 
n» agms ex urbo, fesUnabant Fe.sti„atc, pneilae. nt collcm occu' 
petis. bcrvt,s,j^nem>rt.ans, per forum festinavit. Multos leporcs 
nooavnnus Quot h^^tium necavistis ? Duri agricolae, nudi arate 
Ml ites soalas seoum portant, ut urbem facile Intrent* Mimes 
soalas socum portabant, ut urbem facile intrarent • Nautae nanpm 
seoun. portantes, per undas ad navem nabunt. Milifes tmL ™ 
m castni secum portanto. Omno frumentnm vobiscum no portetis, 
Cen-us latidavit ramasa cornua, nimiam tenuitatcm crunim vitune> 
avit Civos cum civibus do virtuto certabant. - 

Q\vo me br^ad. The foa-es of the enemy were hastening through 
he .sland. The poet gave a letter to the queen. The wolves wiU 

shnu AVhy do you call on the slave? The messenger points out 
the wny to the general. The servant T.as preparing medidne for hL 
ma.<;tor. Let us take a walk in the garden. The farmer rides 

r t r ^t!'^'- '^'r '"T "^«^^-^^^'^« (^-^P^/') tlm^ugh his fields 
c^ery day. The master often praised his pupils. When Caesar had 
entered the city the citizens, with many t<jars, obtained peace. Tho 
Imsbandman sailed over the fields which he had lately ploughed 






', anil taking 
k (lat cnrinina 
otuneni pntri 
r. 

is conceived 
used for tlic 



FIU8T LATIN RRADEIl. 



63 



nediam noc- 


'Ji^H 


ctim servis 




iter mens id 




>ccnpaverint 




jjnmtp. Si 




t niRgnam. ^ 


"^J 


n portantes, 




ollcm occu- 




Itoa leporcs '^ 




Hudi arate. 




* Militea 




tae, panem 




frnmentura 




10 portetis. ^ 




m vitupe^ 




ig through 




tvolves will j 




ied-on his | 




points out 1 




ine for his 




"mer rides 1 




h his fields 1 




Uaesar had 1 




ace. Tho 




ghed. ^ 




1 

w expre8st>« s 




nt or fntura t 




■St time, tt 





-r 



4. (SvNTAx) IIU.K XV.-7%. y;ord e.vpremng the agent is, after 
jassm verbs, nmally put m the ablative with a or ah; «- l4ri 

Ki'dc'lt p! 2l!r'''' '^'' ^'^' "'' ^''"'^''^ ^^ '^ '"""'''' ^'^^ 
C. liut the agent h Bometimcs ,,ut in tho dative without a preiiosition • 

EXERCISE IfXU,^ 
Pueri boni u magi.tro laudantur. ^ laudar's a me. Wdilt '*^' 
upoparunur. Ager arabitu\ Laudamnr a rege. iuxiSl 
egaU. rogabatur. .Nostri equites ab hostibus s^t fugat^ i^^i 
tl^rXrT^'fr- ^^^^'-—oparetur. Ililes gla!}; 
. e anil h • i '^ '"'' "* ^""'^^'^ * "^«- ^^^"tes occupati 
V< uT fner^^r"'- ^,f '^f *^'^^-"tur voce a.elli. Inutilis crat rex, 
I qui f.erat datus. •Mandata f.irtim Mercurio dantur ad Jovem 

F::r : Zr^™ ^°«^- ^^^^^^ -t. Laudamim a magS; 

qua non nor leo fDonum puero datum est. Doni puero data 

rturans wlr^ T^n' ■ ^''''' ^^ ^^^^™« ^^ Italiam,^^.'^^. 
maturans, legates convocat. Copiae a Cassio revocantur Insidiae 

iS OS un V T^^'T T'' ^"•"Senti cquites in pugna apud 
Fu non Lf "'''*T ^^'"^ ^'"^ I^^^ ^'^g^tos suos gessit. 

B ur non est amandus. Laudabat amicum, ut ab amico laudarttur 

gentafbv'thf I*r f 'n''' ^""^ '''^^ ^^'"^^^ -^ to the 
tiieUauls Many hares had been killed during the winter The 

tnends. The farmer's daughters had been praised by the queen 
Thr'n^t^J^n^lV" '"^"- ^'^ P-* -- Praised'by the'kLg.' 
ms ct Mren 1^ h' '' '"T ."^'^ '"^'^"^^^^ '^ ^^ed about 
^bunt bv tl«\ r T ^"^^' *^"""S ^""^'^'^^- The temple 
emnlP,nf?h ^^^ ^^°S^« ^^^ers. We were freed from fear. The 
temples of the gods were built by the people. Letters were « ven to 

PeacocU^^ wUlbe^beaten^y tb, beaks of the peacocks. 

• Fac {Qx/aciU) «<, " eco tbat " 



I i 



54 



rmST LATIN RliADEK. 



SECTION XIV.—REGULAR 

X ACTIVK 

Principal Parts — MSngo, Montii, 



INDICATIVE. 



PIi£S.—(l advise, Ac.) 

S. MSn-eo, Mon-es, Mon-lt 

P. Mon-emus, Mon-gtis, Mon-ent 



JMPERF.—iX was advising, Aa) 
S. Mon-ebam, Mon-ebas, Mon-ebat 
P. Mon-ebamus, Mon-ebatis, Mon- 
ebant 

4 



SCBJUNCTIVB. 



(I may advise, Ac.) 
Mon-^am, Mon-eas, Mon-eat 
Mon-eamus, Mon-eatia, Mon-eant 



FUT.—(l BhaU or will advise, Ac.) 

S. Mon-ebo, Mon-ebis, Mon-ebit 

P. Mon-eblmus, Mon-ebltio, Mon- 
ebont 



(I might, could, <fcc, be advising, Ac.) 
Mon-erem, Mon-eres, Mon-eret 
Mon-5remn«, Mon-eretis, Mon- 
erent 



PERF.—(I have advised, Ac.) 
S. Monti-i, Monu-isti, Monu-it 

P. Mona-Imn8,Moiiu-istis,Mona- 
iruut, or Monu-ere 



(I may be about to advise, Ac.) 
Moniturus sim, Moniturus sit, 

Moniturufl sit 
Monituri simus, Mouitori sitis, 

Monituri sint 



PLUPERF.- (I had advised, Ac) 
S. Monu-eram, Monu-eras, Monu- 

erat 
P. Monu-eram'ia, Monu-eratis, 

Monu-erant 



(I may iiuve advised, Ac.) 
Monii-erim, Monu-eris, Monu- 
erit 

Mouu-erlmus, Monn-erftis, 
Monu-erint 



(I might, could, Ac., have advised, Ac.) 

Monu-issem, Moim-isses, Monu- 

isset 
Monu-issenrfus, Monu-issetis, Monu 

issent 



FUT. PERF.-{\ shall have adrlsed, Ac.) 
S. Monu-ero, Monu-eris, Monu-erit 
P» Monu-er!mua, Monu-eriitis, 
Monu-erint 



SUPINE, 
let. Monlt-uin, to advise. 
Sd, Monlt-u, io be adokud. 



FIEST LATIN BEADKB. 



05 



fULAB 

ACTIVB 
Montii. 



.) 

»n-eat 

Mon-eant 

ising, Ac.) 
jn-eret 
is, Mon- 

e, Ac) 
urus ffls, 

mi sitis. 



&C.) 

, Monu- 
■erftis, 

'ised, Ac.) 
I Monu- 

is, MoDU 



VERBS— SECOND CONJUGATIOll 
VOICE. 

Monltum, Monere, to advise. 

IMPERATIVE. 



(Advise thou, &c) 
-, Mon-e 
— , Mon-e te 



INFINITIVE. 



(To advise.) 
Mon-ero 



PARTICIPLE. 



(Advising.) 
Mon-ens, -entis, &c. 
Mon-ens, -entia 
Mon-ens, -entis 



(J 



y-t^t/o 



ffhou slialt advise, Ac.) 
— , Mon-eto, Mon-eto 



- , Mon-etote, Mon 
ento 



I 



(To be about to adrisa) 
Monit-urum ) 

--uram > esse 

•urum J 



^1 JSeeJ\it_Par^ci^ I [From stem of supine. J 



(About to advisa) 
Monit-urus, -uri, &c. 
Monit-ura, -urae 
Monit-nrnm, -uri 



(To have advised, Ac) 
Monu-isse 



' 



GERUND. 

4cc. Monend-um, advising. 

6en. Monend-i, of advising. 

^■oX, 5ionend-o, U> or for advising. 

Ail. Mcaend-o, by,/ror,i, or in ad^,^,ng. 



66 



FIRST LATIN READER. 



REGULAR VERBS.- 

PASSIVE 

Principal Parts— Monger, Monltus 



INDICATIVE. 



J'UES. -(I am ad?l»od, Ao ) 
S. mSn-eor, Mon-eris, (or -ere,) 

Mon-etor 
P. Mon-emur, Mon-emini, Mon- 

entur 



SUBJUNCTIVE. 



IMPERF.~{1 was advised, «kc.) 
S. Mon-ebar, Mon-ebaris, (or 

-ebare,) Mon-ebatur 
P. Mon-ebamur, Mon-ebamini, 

Mon-ebantur * 



(I may be advised, Ac.) 
Moa-gar, Mon-earis, (&.- -eare, 
Mon-eatur 

Mon-eamur, Mon-eamini, Mon- 
eantur 



FUT.-{1 sbaU or will be advised, Ac.) 

S. Monebor, Mon-eberis, {or 

-6bere,) Mon-ebitur 
P Mon-ebimur, Mon-ebimini, 

Mon-ebantur 



(I might or should be advised, Ac.) 
Mon-erer, Mon-ereris, (or -erere) 
Mon-eretur 

Mon-eremur, Mon-eremini, Moa- 
ercnfnr 



I'ERF.- (I have been advised, Ac.) 

S. Monlt-us (-a, um) sum, Monit- 

us Ss, Monit-us est 
P. Monlt-i siimus, Monit-i estis, 

Uonit-i sunt 



PLUPERF.~{1 had been advised, Ac.) 

S. MonIt-U8 eram, Monit-us eras, 

Monit-us erat 
P. Monlt-i eramus, Monit-i eratis, 

Monit-i erant 



(1 may have been advised, Ac.) 

Monit-as (-a, -nm) sim, Monit-us 

sis, Monit-us sit 
Monit-i simus, Monit-i sitis, 

Monit-i sint 



(I might or riiould have been advised. 
Ac.) 

Monlt-UH essem, Monit-us ecses, 

Monit-us esset 
Monlt-i easemas, Wonit-i essetia, 

Monit-i essent 



FUT. PERF.-a shall have been 

advised, &c.) 

y. Monlt-ua ero, Monitus eris, 

Monit-us erit 
P. Monit-i eriuius, Monit-i, eritis, 
Monit-i eruQt 



FIR&T LATIN IlEADJfiK. 



57 



ERBS.- 

PASSIVE 

, Monltua 



I, Ac.) 
(.or -eare,, 

mini, Mon- 

Ivised, Ac.) 
{or -erere,) 

nini, Muu- 



ed, Ac.) 
> Monit-u8 
it-i sitis, 

'■a advistiU, 
-us ecses, 
;-i essetifl, 



SECOND CONJUGATION. 
VOICE. 

Bum, Moneri, to he advised. 



IlIPEKATIVK. 



(Be tliou advised, <fcc.) 
- , Mon-ere 

-, Mone-mlni 



INFINITIVE, 



(To bo advised.) 
Mou-erl 



(Thou slmlt be advised, 
-,Mon-etor, Mon-etor 

-,Mon-ebimiiii, Mon- 
entor 



(To be about to be 
advised.) 

Monit-oia iri 



(To liave beeu advised.) 



Monit-um ] 

— am i esso 

• urn ) 



PARTIOIPLB. 



(Deserving or requirinu 
to be adTised.) 

Mon-endus, -enda, 

-endiim 
Mon-endi, -eudae, 

-endi, kc. 



(Advised, or having been 
advised.) 

Mo.iit-us, -a, -um 
Monit-i, ae, i, kc. 



66 



FIKST LATIN READER. 



J: ^^^'''"^''Kf'''^ XVL-^^,i.,an^^■... v;hich stand in appoH^ 
IZty^ItT ''^'''' '"^ '''''' "^^ ^''"^^' ^^""^ ^^'*^' ^> 




EXERCISE XX. 

Semis ^mJum vino implet. Servus poculum domino implebat 

Agncola nudo capite in horto ambulabat. Sacci tumTnt multo liordeo 

La trones mulum ferro sauciant. Vacuus viator non timet latrones.' 

Mula spohata casus flevit suos. GracuJus superbus se gregi pavonura 

JWrc./^™°'' '"^"^'«^^^*- ^ lupuB agnmn nece injusta laceravit. 

J ffgna, supenor stans, sicTupo respondit. Canis per flumen natans 

simulacrum suum in speculo lympharum vidit. Canes cibum ore 

<yy^^.,^afi.mm^t. Pater deonim risit, atque ranis regem dedit parvum 

tigUlum. Motus sonusque tigilli pavidas ranas terruit. Inertes ^-a^ 
ranae, necem frustra ftigitabitis. MandatT^ Jovem Mercuri/^? 
demus. Ij onne domos aedificatis, ut in iis habitetis ? Quum tigUlum 
m limo dm jacuisset, rana quaedam, ceteris audacior, comites 
cunctas evocat. Serve, aouam vino mihi misce. Si in speculum 
lympharum a^ectfis, simulacrum tuum videbis. Quum Divitiacua 
plunbus verbis flens rogaret, ut veniam peccatis daret fratris, Caesar 
bemgne respondit. Caesar hostes castra movere jubet. 









The enemy move their camp. Let us obey our parents You 
warned your friend in vain. When the log waJlying \impt sulT) 

^tL "Vhrr'^ r'' ^ ^^^^^^ ^^«° caned^u^ ^f her 2. 
mtes. The deserters hasten to the river, through fear of punish- 

tTtht V t TT'^^^l "^ '^'^ ^'■'- ^"1 ^^^^ ^^"^ed) my message 
the king, I shall not fear. The Belgians ha^e many to^s. The 
Bh^pherd saw a savage wolf near the stalls. You have avoided many 
danger. The helpless frogs vainly endeavoured-to-escape-frm 
tZf^^' ,^^«q"«-^--ted her misfortunes. With J e^ 
tears the father lamented the death of his only son. The bama 

ml "^' r.'^"*^?' 'r^*- ^^^ ^^^^- ^' maim the shT 
80^ Th.h^V"°'^- 7^; ^""'^'^ ^"^ in vain warned his foolish 
8on^ The helpless crowd of frogs was vainly endeavouring to escape 
ft«m a violent-death. Let the maid-servant mix some wine with 

niuutn. The boys saw s <\no >jwinin.:nn. ^.w- „ i i _• __ 

- — Q — ™.„,,,^ vtoi o uiuou rivur. 



FIBST LATIN HEADJiLB. 



59 



EXERCISE XXI. 



ior, comites 



cum /t 



|tivt^ 



K/t^2-0 



Poculum vino impletur. Poculum vino impletum est. Pocula ^ ^ 
vmoinjpletasunt. Agnus nece injusta laceratus est a lupo. StEs /^Htt 
ndetur. Castra Gallorum tenebantur a Romanis. Mons teiSTa ^ 
Labieno. Ranae territae sunt motu sonoque tigilli. Vinum aqua 
,vniiscetur. Aqua vino mixta erat. Fac ut vinum aqua misceatur 
Kecte dedistis* operam ut vinum aqua misceretur. Cibus ore canis 
tenebatur. Castra hostium propius urbem' moventur. Agricolae 
amici frustra erant moniti. Dona pueris dentur ! Britanni a 
Caesare obsides dare jubentur. Pueri et puellae a magistro doce- 
bantur. Corvus celsa sSdetaDbore. quaU^ videtur tibi opera vocis 
meae ? Sunius^sedit j^^lkev lupum efc viUpem. Una pars 
oppidi flumine rapido oontinetur. Britanni figura navium Romanorum 
sur ->ermoti. Socrates habebatur sapientissimus . Moniti sunt pas- 
tores, ut periculum vitarent. Puer a patre suo doceatur. Pueri sunt 
docendi, dum aetas sit tenera. Moniti eramus, ut pravos comites 
vitaremus. Puer ab avunculo docebatur. 

Gifts had been given to the faithful servants. The shepherds were 
warned mvam. ThegirlswUlhavebeen warned in vain. The goddess 
was moved by the tears of the suppliants. Let children be taught by 
then: parents. Let the cups be filled with milk. The camp of the 
Germans had been shifted the day before. The forces of the Gauls 
are temfied at the sight of the Roman cavalry. Caesar was in vain 
warned not to (ne with tmperf. subj.) enter the senate-house. A 
sword was given to the soldier. If a sword be given to the soldier, 

A t\ T'""^^ *^® '^""'^^^ °^ ^is native countiy. The king 
w^ dreaded by aU his subjects (citizens). The inhabitants of the 

Iw r/' T'^'^ ^^ ^^^ ^^^^^ ^^ *^^« ^««°^y'« fleet. The timid 
race (of frogs) was temfied by the motion and splash (noise) of the 
shaUow-water. The first share was given to the lion, because h 
Z T fV^f^ ^^'' ^' Siven to the farmer's sons and daugh- 
o^me lieutenants, that the mountain be occupied by 



iU^lT"""^ "'" ^^'^ ""*'• ^^'«'^'- t° '^'^ object: i*.. to ex.n one'e seJ to 



I 



60 



riltST LATIN READER. 




SECTION XV.-REGULAR 

ACTIVB 

Principal PARxs—Lggo, Legi, 



INDICATIVE. 



PHES. — (I choose, <fcc.) 
S. !<% 0, Leg-l8, Leg-It 
P. L2g-Imiis, Leg-It5is, Leg-unt 



8UBJUN0TIVK. 



(I may choose, Ac.) 
Leg-am, Leg-as, Leg-at 
Leg-amQs, Leg-atis, Leg-ant 



IMPERF.-{1 was choosing, Ac.) 
S. Leg-ebam, Leg-ebas, Leg-ebSt 
P. Leg-ebamus, Leg-ebatis, Leg- 
ebant 



(I might choose, Ac.) 
Leg-erem, Leg-eres, Leg-eret 
Leg-ertimus, Leg-eretis, Leg-erent 



i UT.—(\ shall or will choose, Ac) 

S. L6?.ani, Leg-fi8, Leg-et 

P. Leg-emus, Leg-gtfs, Leg-eat 



PERF.—{\ have chosen, Aa) 
S. Leg-i, Leg-isti, Leg-It 
P. Leg-imiis, Leg-istis, Leg- 

erunt or -ere 



(I may be about to choose, Ac.) 
Lectiirus (-a, -urn) aim, Lecttirus 

SIS, Lecttirus sit 
LectQri (-ae, -a) simus, Loctftri 

sitis, Lecturi sint 

(I may have chosen, Ac) 
Leg-eiim, Leg-grXs, Leg-erlt 
Leg-Srlmiis, Leg-gritis, Leg- 
erint 



PLUPERF.-{\ had chosen, Ac) 
S. Leg-eram, Leg-eras, Leg-erat 
P. Leg-eramus, Leg-eratia, Leg- 
erant 



(I might have chosen, Ac) 
Leg-issem, Leg-isses, Leg-isset 
Leg-issemufi, Leg-issetis, Leg- 
issent «. 



FUT. PERF.-a shaU have chosen, 
Ac) 
S. Leg-ero, Leg-eris, Leg-erlt 
P. Leg-er!mu3, Leg-erltla, Leg- 
erint 



SUPINES. 

1st, L«ct-um, to choose. 
2cl, Lect-u, to be dioaen. 







GULAR 

ACTIVB 
'go. Legi, 



at 
^eg-aut 



I 



rnwT LAnx reader, 

7ERBS.--TniRD CONJUaATION. 

VOICB. 

Lectum, L?g2re, to choose. 



61 



IMPERATIVB. 
(Choose thou, <kc.) 

-, Leg-ItS 



INFINTTIVR. 



Cro choose.) 
LSg-5r8 



PARTICIPIK. 



(Choosing) 

leg-ens. -ens. -ens 

leg-entis.-entia.-entis 
&c. 



(Thou Shalt choose. <fec.) (To be about to choose. 
— , Leg-Ito. Leg-Ito 



ISg-itote, Leg- 
unto 



I 



Lect-urum 

■ uram V esse 

urura ) 

[See Fut. Participle.] 



(About to cliooNc) 

Lect-urus. -ura. -umm 
uri, -urae, -uri, 

&c. 



[From stem of supine.] ' 



i 




OERUKD, 
Acc. I,r;j»end-um, choosing. 
Oen. Lcfr(>nd-i, of dioosisHi. 
Ijit L.ffciiti-o, to i,r for ',hoo»ing. 
Jill. L»'gcnd-o, by or in dionaing. 



9U 



flUBT LATIN READKR. 



FEOULAR VERBS.- 

PASSIVB 

Principal Parts — 



IlfDIOATriTE. 



PRES.—(1 am chosen, Ac.) 
S. Lgg-or, legr-^ria {or -ere), legr- 

Itnr 
P. L8g-Ixtmr, Leg-Imlnl, Leg- 

untur 



8UBJUKCTIVR. 



IMPERF.-(l was chosen, Ac.) 
S. L?g-ebar, Leg-eb&ris (or -ebare), 

Leg-ebatur 
P. Lgg-ebamur, Leg-ebat^ini, Leg- 

ebantnr 



(I may be chosen, Ac.) 
L^g-ar, Leg-iris {or -are), Leg. 
atur 

Leg-amur, Leg-5mlni, Leg- 
aQtar 



(T mlRht or should be chosen, Ac.) 
Leg-erer, Leg-eroris (or -erere), 

Leg-eretur 
Leg-eremur, Leg-eremlni, Leg- 

erentur 



FUT.~(\ shall or will be chosen, Ae.) 
S. L^g-ar, Leg-Sris {or -ere), Leg- 

5tnr 
P. LSg-Smor, Leg-fimXni, Leg- 
entnr 



PERF.—{1 have been chosen, Ac.) 

S. Lect-U8 (-a, -nm) Bum. lect-ua 

Ss, Lect-as est 
P. Lect-i sfimus, Lect-i estis, 

Lect-i sunt 



PLUPERF.—(l had been chosen, Ac.) 

S. Lect-U8 erani, Lect-us eras, 

Leet-us erat 
P. Lect-i eramus, Lect-i era^s, 

Lect-i erant 



(I may have been chosen, Aa) 

Lect-as sim, Lect-us sis, Lect-Od 
sit 

Lect-i simus, Lect-i sitis, Le«t-i 
sint 



Fl/T. PERF.-a shall have been chosen, 
Ac) 

S. Lect-us ero, Lect-us erid, Lect-us 

erit 
P. Lect-i erimus, Lect-i eritis, 

Lect-i erunt 



(I might or shpuld have been chosen, 
Ac.) 

Lect-us essem, Lect-uu esses, Lect- 
us esset 

Lect-i essemuH, Lect-i essetis, 
Lect-i essen 






FIKST LATIN READBR. 



63 



IRBS.- 

PASSIVE 

Parts — 





Ac) 




-an 


0. Legr- 


ni, 


Leg- 


lien, 


Ac.) 


or 


-erere), 


Ini, 


Leg- 



n, Aa) 
I Lect-tu 
is, Lect-i 

n chosen, 
^es, Lect- 
essetis, 



THIRD CONJUGATION. 
VOICE. 

I%or, Lectus sum, Lggi. 




(Thonihalt be chosen, Ac.) 
— . Leg-Itor, Leg-itor 

— . leg-SmJnl, Leg. 
nntor 



(To be about to be chosen.) 
Lect-nm iri 



(To have been chosen.) 

Lect-um -j 

am S-ease 

' urn-' 



(About to be chosen, &c.) 
Leg-enduB, -enda, 

-«ndam 
Leg-endl, -«ndae, 

-endi, &c. 



(Chosen, or having been 
chosen.) 

Iect-u8, -a, <un 



Lect-I, -ae, -i, &c. 




64 



FTRST TATIN RKAnKR. 



^frt4^ ^19«PE XXII. 

Deiis nijimlm)! rcgjt Pucri cumint per agros. HoatM Icjrnto.i 
ad Caesarcin inittunt. Ptiella epistolam ad matrem «crihel.at 
Curramus in hortum. Cnrramus in horto. PneUa nnntium n.j 
parentes suos niiBit. AntLpii Britanni lacte et Mfl ^hant Copina 
Romanonuu duxifc Caesar. Catilina confligero cum Antonio Btatnit 
Multas epistolas no scribas. ^dui legates ad Labiennm miscrunt' 
qui do pace agercnt. Caesar Britannos vicit Die* niihi hoc tantmn 
Pastor sedulus oves ad rivum duxit. Omnia vincit amor Rcgina 
Britannonim omnes hostes vincat ! Dux aermanonim exercitum 
trans flumen Rhcnum duxerat. Puerum, epistolam ad patrem 
Bcnbentem, laudavit magister. Caesar cum omni enuitatu facit 
mipetum m hostcs. Quondam sol duiit uxorem. Y^ eV c'apella 
et ovis cervum vasti corporis in saltibus ccpenint. Primam partem 
leoni tribuetis, quia i))u3 valet. Passercm, fletus edentera graves 
^cipiter rapuit. Cur fecisti aquam turbulentam mihi bi^benti ? 
Ranae magno clamore regera a Jove petierunt. Quum omnia 
dixeris, rcspondebo. 

The Belgians will send ambassadors to Caesar, to treat concernin<» 
peace. The dogs nm. The sheep were running towards the fold 
through fear (ahl.) of the wolf. The forces of the Belgians hasten 
towards the city. A great part of the army leaves the city. The 
general had sent a messenger to the camp of the enemy. The kin" 
will give honours to the soldiers who did not abandon the city l( 
you will write me a letter, I shall feel grateful to you. The'boys 
were nmning through the farmers' fields. Ariovistus married two 
wives. May the citizens overcome all their enemies ! Why have you 
titken my book? Octavia, sister of Octavianus, married Antony 
Antony married Octavia, the sister of Octavianus. The Germans 
send an ambassador to Caesar to beg peace. 



I 



V 



EXERCISE XXIII. .^// — 

Mundus a Deo regitur. Legati ad Caesarem sunt missi. Principes 
civitatis ad hostium ducem mittantur. Epistola ad matrem suam a 



* ""'0 l^^^» <"^'>' I «»y. duro, I lca(1./a«V), I do, or mako, an.l/m>, 1 Drlnir. u.uallv 
dronthe final e of thn M sir,tr„i.r ™.^o..»*...- -_j ..- .'.. . -'" ' * "'."'^' "■"«"> 

'^ — • "i"-'S>i< V, Eiiu iiiaac ciic, aar, .TOc, aaa,rer. 



65 



loates legatos 
era Bcrihebat 
nuntium nj 
Bhant. Copiaa 
ntonio Btatnit. 
urn miscrunt, 
In hoc tnntnm. 
rnor. Rcgina 
nil exercitnra 
n ftd patrem 
^nitatu facit 
£ca et capclla 
imam partem 
ntem graves, 
lihi bibenti ? 
Quum omnia 



at concerning 
ards the fold 
gians hasten 
le city. The 
r. The king 
the city. It' 
u. The boys 
married two 
V^hy have you 
ried Antony, 
'he Germans 



i. Principes 
rem snam a 



brinK, usually 
and fer. 



«v5*| 



pnella est mfwa. Copiae Romflnnnim .-« n •* 

retcrcnl. Barbari » CoeZ™ .^n *T T ^ T^^ °' "ociet„te,7 

«t cc™,. v.« eon^rr::^:,:: cap :'r.'''iX':. r;;- 

apiens. A narfinfibi,« ,»u*x.: '_ , .. ,/^7. °. ^^ '"^^e- 



llianOfl. MnrrnTT,..!*.-!... 1, <^/L,«iSr^ 



l"P"m. Relinquebati. mia :i: per Seol^^^^^^^^ ""^ '"^•""' ^ 
hominuraceleritercoactacst Mnn! ^Tl ^]^S^ nmltitudo JT J^ 
pr.-eccnmt. Nemrrctl sp^"rr\^^^^^^^^^^^^ '^^^^^^^ ^^-^^' 

dubitabit. Roman! temphim Jani biVn^f v P^ovidentia 

unt. Princines civitaf Un i o ^ ^"'"''^ ''^""» ^'auser- 

LegatiabiS vTn^:* it^r^S^l^^-r 77^"^ 
venerunt, ut auxilium postulur nt Let ah ^ , ^'^''' "^ ^^"'^ 

by't^f; -l:'" •*;::"':" '^^ "^ cm.™,, era,™, wa, slain 

patched to the city to ask elnv TlTt' , "'^'^ger be dis- 

fortified. A letter »?H L t -^ u '°™' "' "'« '^''sians were 
were b„ ItTn he pw" 5.1,711" ^- 7 ""'''■■• ^'""^ "°"^'=» 

stress «£"£^='=; 

be sent to the general's tnnf t ^ "^'f ^''^^^^ ambassadors will 

beg for the li e'of he cit^ens Maf '""'' ^'"' *^ ^'^ ^"^-> *« 
consuls in one dav Thp l ^ ^ "^"''' ''^'^ ^"""^"^^ ^y the 

Many hares were clu.hthv ^''l ^"'J''' ''' ^"' ^^ ^lie robber.. 

had been en. Ze^ilVr''' 'T ^'^ S^"«^^''« *«"* 
(Mv) were cau"ht L fn u ^f^''^"^"^- Two stags of huge size 

-tt treVo^ttll^;^^^^^^^^ ^" ''^ -^^- better: were 



I 



The supi 



llSi) 



ne in -um b „.ed after rerb., of .notion, to InUicat 



te a purpose. 



66 



FIRST LATIN RKVDEn. 



SECTION XVI.— REGULAR 



ACTIVE 

Principal Parts — Audio, 



INDICATIVB. 



PRES.—(l hear, or am hearing, Ac.) 
S. Aud-io, Aud-is, Aud-It 
P. Aud-imus, Aud-itis, Aud-iunt 



BUBJUNCTIVE. 



IMPERF.~{1 was hearing, &c.) 
S. Aud-Iebam, Aud-iebas, Aud- 
iebat 

P. Aud-iebamus,Aud-iebatis, Aud- 
iebant 



FUT.~{1 shall or will hear, Ac.) 
S. Aud-Iam, Aud-ies, Aud-iSt 

P. Aud-iemas, Aud-ietis, Aud- 
ient 



(I may hear, Ac) 
Aud-Jam, Aud-ias, Aud-i&t 
Aud-Umus, Aud-i&tis, Aud-iant 



(I might hear, Ac.) 
Aud-Irem, Aud-irea, Aud-iret 

Aud-lremus, Aud-iretis, Aud-irent 



(I may be about to hear, Ac.) 
Auditurus aim, Auditurus sis, 

Anditurus sit 
Andituri simus, Audituri sitis, 

Audituri sint 



PERF.—{1 have heard, Ac.) 
S. Andlv-i, Audiv-isti, Audiv-it 

P. Audlv-Imus, Audiv-istis, Aud- 
iv -erunt, or -ere 

PLUPERF.—{\ had heard, Ac.) 
S. Audlv-eram, Audiv-eras, Aud- 

iv-erat 
P. Audiv-eramus, Audiv-eratis, 

Audiv-erant 



(I may have heard, Ac.) 
Audiv-erim, Audiv-eris, Audiv- 

erit 
Audiv-ei^mus, Audiv-eritis, 

Audiv-erint 



PUT. PERP.—(\ shall have heard, Ac) 
S. Audlv-ero, Audiv-eris, Audiv- 

erit 
P. Audiv-erlmus, Audiv-erltis, 

Audiv-erint 



(I might have heard, A&) 

Audiv-issem^ Audiv-isses, AudiT- 

isset 
Audiv-issemua, Audiv-issetis, Aud- 

iv-issent 



SUPINES. 

Ist, Auditum, to hear. 
2d. Aadifii, to be lieard. 



FIRST LATTN RKADER. 



67 



^ULAR 

ACTIVE 

— Audio, 



id-i&t 

, Aud-iant 



c) 
ud-iret 

I, Aud-irent 



ar, Ac.) 
ituruB sis, 

Lturi sitisi 

<&c.) 

Is, Audiy- 

iiv-eritis, 

. Ac) 

es, AudiT- 

isetis, Aud- 



VERBS.— FOURTH CONJUGATION. 
VOICE. 

Audivi, Auditum, Audlre. 



IMPERATIVE, 



(Hear thou, Ac.) 
— , Aud-i 
— . Aud-Ite 



INPINITIVK. 



(To hear.) 
Aud-Ire 



PARTIOIPLg. 



(Hearing.) 
And-iens, -ientia 
Aud-iens, -ientis 
Aud-iens, -ienus, &c. 



(Thou Shalt hear, Ac) 
—, Aud-Ito, Aud-Ito 

—, And-itote, Aud- 
iimto 



(To be about to hear.) 
Anditur-um ) 

am > esse 

^ urn ) 



(About to hear.) 
Auditur-us, -i 
Anditur-a, -ae 
Auditur-um, -i, &c. 



(To have heard.) 
Aadiv-isse 




OERl)Nl>. 



. - -"^•■«u, lu urjor /If 

•^t. Audiendo, by hearing. 



68 



FIRST LATIN READER, 



REGULAR VERBS.- 

PASSIVK 

Principal Parts — Audior 



IRDIOATIVE. 



PRES.—{1 urn hoard, &c) 
H. And-Ior, Aud-Iris, (or -ire,) 

Aud-Itur 
P. Aud-Imar, Aud-Imini, Aud- 

iuntnr 



IMPERF.-{\ was heard, &e) 
S. Aud-Iebar, Aud-lebaria, [or 

-iebare,) Aud-iebatur 
P. Aud-iebamur, Aud-iebamini, 
Aud-iebantur 



SUnJUNCTIVK. 



(I may bo heard, Ac.) 
Aud-Iar, Aud-i&ris, Aud-iatnr 

Aud-iamur, Aud-iamini, Aud- 
iantur 



FUT.—(\ shall or will be Iieard, Ac.) 

S. And-Iar, And-i§ri8, {jor -iere,) 

Aud-ietur 
P. And-iemar, Aud-iemini, And- 

ientur 



(I might or should bo heard, Ac.) 
Aiid-lrer, Aud-ireris, [or -irere,) 

Aud-iretur 
Aiid-iremur, Aud-iremini, Aud 
irentur 



PERF.—{1 UaTC been heard, Ac.) 

S. Audlt-U8 (-a, -um) sum, Audit- 

us 68, Auditus est 
P. Audit-i sumus, Audit-i estis, 

Audit-i sunt 



PLUI'EliF.-(\ had been heard, Ac.) 

S. Audit-US eram, Audit-us eras, 

Audit-US erat 
P. Audit-i eranius, Audit-i eratis, 

Audit-i erant 



PUT. PERF.-Q. shall have been heard, 

Ac) 
S. Audit-US ero, Audit-us eri.s, 

Audit-US erit 
P. Audit-i erimus, Audit-i eritis, 

Audit-i erunt 



(I may have been heard, Ac.) 

Audit-U8 aim, Audit-U8 sis, 

Audit-us sit 
Audit-i simus, Audit-i aitis, 

Auditi-i sint 



(F might or should have boon heard, 
Ac) 

Audit-us essem, Audit-us esses, 

Audit-us esset 
Audit-i essemus, Audit-i c.s.setis, 

Audit-i essent 



FIKST LATIN IlKADKil. 



69 



5RBS.-- 

PASSIVK 
— Audior 



!. 


Ac.) 




ud-iatur 


aini, 


Aud- 


card, 


Ac.) 


{or 


-irere,) 


mini, 


Aud 



I'd, Ac.) 

it-ns sis, 
it-i sitis, 

ccn lieard, 
t-us esses, 
it-i e.s.setis, 



FOURTH CONJUGATION. 
VOICE. 

Audltus sum, Audiri, to be heard. 



IMPERATIVE. 



INFINITIVE. 



(Be thou heard, Ac) i (To be hoard) 

-, Aud-Ire I Aud-Iri 



— , Aud-Imini 



PARTICIPLE. 






(Thou Shalt be heard, At) 

-, Aud-Itor, Aud-itor 

— 1 Aud-iSmim, Aud- 
iontor 



(To be about to be heard.) 
Audit-wn iri 



(To have been lieard.) 

Audit-am ) 

am I esse 

um ) 



(Deserving or requiring 
to be heard.) 

Audiend-ua, -i 

Audiend-a, -ae 

Aadiend-nm, -i 



(Heard, or having been 
heard,) 
Andit-os, -i 
Audit-a, -M 
Audit-um, -i 




70 



FnWT LA.TIN READEA. 



,/ EXERCISE XXIV. 

Pweri in cubiciilo dprmiunt. *>Pueri totam noctem in cubiculo d2^ JrxA 
(%^, . a^ebant. Pastor ad magnum oppidum vSnit. Ad rapidum flumeu 
vSniet viator. Caesar binacastra muniit.* Hostes c^te]JAin.mQpti- 
bus muniebant. Canis d^ffif Ai arft^/'^ Lupus et ^5^Srivura 
eundem vSnSrant. Copiae Belgaruin"ad urbem vendhint. Quum urCj^ 
Caesar ad castra munita venisset, hostes ad euni legates miserunt, ^^*^ 
qui pacem peterent. Ranae petiere regem a Jove. Turba ranarura 
L^,^t^ supra lignum insilit. Lignum quum ranae omni contumelia inqui- 
nassent, misere ad Jovem, alium rogantes regem. Cupiditatibust 



L^m 1 L ., ^*^^^* ?2allLs. Cupiditatibus nejeiTiay , Aper venit ad leonem ful- 

s. Calorem solis sentimus. V\ 






v^nineis dentibus. CaJofem soIis seniiBlus7"^aesar duo maxima bella 
aestateunafiniit. Nonne^damorem magnum sentitis ? Miles quidam 



1^0 



r' 



U.. 



§l®mQSLfulgura monies *"eriunt. Ig^^icant oculi. Gives urbem 
novgrn condiderant. Omnia parturitarbos. Parturiunt montes. Noa 
patriae fines linquaraus. Formosus puer in parvo cubiculo dormiet. 
Crassus castra sdi'initnierat. Bina castra muniet Caesar. Puer iu 
cubiculum suum dormitum missus est. Improbus latro irag servit. 
Pueri boni parentibus obgdiimt. Magistro obedite. Dionysiua 
tyrannus ludum Corinthi (at Corinth) aperuisse dicitur. 

You came to the gate of the city late at night. Let us not be 
slaves to our passions. The frogs leapt up on the top of the log. 
Do you feel the sun's heat? The father and his son were sleeping 
in a small chamber. The sheep came in terror to the shepherd's 
hut. The boy will sleep the livelong night. Caesar had finished 
the very serious war with (of) the Eelvetii in one summer. I sing ; 
my friend hears. The Romans are coming to a large town. Ambas- 
sadors had come to the Roman general to sue for peace. A messen- 
ger had come from the camp of the Belgians about (de) peace. My 
brother and I had come to the same house. The enemy will have 
fortified many castles on the banks of the river. Let us send a 
messenger to Jupiter, and beg (i.e., begging) for another king. We 
finished the work yesterday. We heard the sound of trumpets in 
the camp. My father and mother will come to-morrow. 

• In the perfect and derived tenses of the Fouitii Coixjujfutiou the v ia ull«m 
omitted, so that rnunivit becomea muniit, 
t See (Syntax) Rule XX-, p. 77. 



[10 



PIRST LATIN KKADER. 



71 



biciilo d2J>- ^fxA 
um flumeii 
fv in,mQpti- 
taa riviira 

miserunt, 
a ranarura 
elia inqui- 

ditatibust 
eonem ful- 
xima bella 
les quidam 

Qus flore8./<Cw<A-o 
ves urbem 
Qtes. Nos 
) dormiet 
Puer iu 
jte servit. 
Dionysiua 



IS not be 
I the log. 
e sleeping 
hepherd's 
1 finished 

I sing; 

Ambas- 
L messen- 
ace. My 
will have 
IS send a 
tig. We 
mpets in 

t> is M&MX 






t 



nM i^- 



2ora cannm in horto 
f^a urbis Ijsstihus t^^-t^v 
pessime, nierito a 



7 



^(K> 



i , EXERCISE XXV. 

Servus mains a domino merito punitur.* , 

Bgpfilijuitui. Ingens fragor in silvis auitur/ 

aperitur. Porta urbis ab hostibus aperitiirr^ x ur pc 

magistratu punitus es. Puen non merito puniuntur.^ Bellum cum 
,^,^ barbaris uno die fijntjim est. Animi militum luxuria molliti erant 
*-^ M r''"'"*^''- Audiaturvoxjustitiae! Terra flori bus vestitur' 

Merito ego pumor, sed frater mens injuste. Sonus tubamm auditus 

Oppida Belgarum mumebantur. Italia A Ipibusmunita est. Puellae 

a matre emdiuntur. Mater curat ut filiae ^d^ligenter emdiantiir JuU^a:^^^ 

Nova nrbs a cm us est condita. Omnis #¥^arili^i 

V'^^ Ir^ « r " f ''" P'^' rescinditur. Praeceptis magistra- 
taum parere atque obedire jubemur. Exercitus Romanus ab Hel- 
I vetns pulsus et sub jugum missus est. Haec munera puerilta i-^H U^^^ i 

annis convenmnt. Maxime prohibenda est ira in puniend^E^! ^ 
vetu jam per angustias transduxerant copias suas, et in ^duorum 
fanes pervenerant. O^dani portas aperuemnt hostibus. 

Lin^ii<i.nai. _i»t^ *>■■■/ 

The body of Caesar was buried by his sorrewing friends 'ibe 

1 \ f mT" *'''"«8>-«»«'i-) The wicked boys were deservedl^ 
pmushed. The sound of the tmmpcts was heart from afS The 
Bntons were clothed with skins. The city had been fortifiTk wi h 

... I mth .he Gauls were buried on the following day. Let us 
tal e care that our children are carefully trained. The magistrates 
«U1 take care that all the wicked robbers bepunished Let "he 
work be speedily finished. Many towns of tte MvetM wl 
tangly forbiied by nature. Let the gates of the city b ™ened to 
he enemy. The bodies of the soldieis had been buried bTthe! 

towns ^f.uT, '"^ '"'" ^"'^'^"^ ^y "» Helvetii. Man, 

towns of the Belgians were set on fire by the enemy. ' 



p. "3. 



But punier is aon.etUuos uied u a dflnonent yerb c... ..,.,/ 



72 



FIRST LATIN READER. 



!l 



SECTION XVIL 

Deponent Verbs are those wliicli liave the inflexions of the Passive Voice 
known, as in Regular Verbs, by the favourite vowd. Deponent^ 
and four imrticiplos. They are tlie only verbs which have a i.erfect 
Adviinccd Grammar, p. 114. 

FIRST CONJUGATION- 



INDICATIVK. 



l'HKS.—{\ iidnioiiish, Ac.) 

8. Hort-or, -aria, &c. 



IMJ'KliF.- 
8. Hort-abar, &o. 



FUT.~ 
8. Hort-abor, -abtris, &c. 



SUBJUNOTIVK, 



(I may iidnionlsh, «kc.) 

Hort-er, -eris, &c. 



Hort-aror, &c. 



Hortaturus sim, ic. 



PERF.— 
8. Hortat-us sum, &c. 



PLVPERF.- 
8. Hortfit-us pram, &c. 



FUT. FERF.— 
8. Hortat-us ero, &c. 



Hortat-us sim, &c. 



Hortat-us essem, &c. 



Sui'iNE— Hortatum, &c. 

SECOND CONJUGATION- 



PRES.— (l ftMu; .fee.) 

8. Ver-eor, -eris, &o. 



IMPERF.— 
8. Ver-ebar, &c. 

FUT.~ 
S. Ver-ebor, &c. 



j PERF.~ 

8. Verit-us sum, &c. 



(I may fear, <fcc) 
Ver-ear, -earis, &c. 



Ver-erer, &c ^ 



PLUPERF.- 
8. Verit-us eram, &c. 



FUT. PERF.— 
S. Verit-us ero, &c. 



Verlt-urus sim, &c. 



Verit-us sim, &c. 



Verit-U8 essem, &c. 



SCPUJE — 'Veritum. 



73 



• FIRST LATIN RKADER 

DEPONEITT VERBS. 

but the meaning of the Activp Tim ««. • 

tove „,.ro form, ,h.„ K^Z' v"u Zlf iT ,'" "'''"'' *" "-"'""S' " 

Hortor, / admonish. 



peculiarities, sec Schmitz"; 



IMPKKATIVB. 



(Admonisli thou, <tc.) 

-,Hort-are,-amini,&c. 



INFINITIVK. 



- , Hort-ator, &c. 



(To admonlsli, &c.) 

Hort-ari 



PARTICll'LK. 
(Adinonisliing, Ac ) 

Hort-ang, kc. 



Hortatur-um 



I, 



- -am S esse 
■ -um-' 



(About to adrnonisli.) 

Hortat-urua. &c. 



Hortat-um esse 



(Deseivliig to be adinon^ 
Ished.) 

,=^._ I IJorta nd-u8, -a, -um 

(Hiiving udinonislu^do" 

Hortat-us,-a,-um,&c. 



Vereor, I fear. 

(Fear thou, Ac.) . ,-,.„ <• 

2:Ver-ere, -emini, &c. | Ver-eri ' """' 



GKiiUMi>— Hoitandum, &c. 



(Fearing, &a) 
Ver-ens. kc. 




. Ver-Stor, 4o. | Verit-urum «se, S„. | Veri^uru, „„,,, a„J 

-=L-_,=— ______ I Ver-endus {.pass.) 

Verit-um esse Verit-us, -a, -um. &c. 



GKKUNu—Vtirendum, &c 



74 



FIRST LATIN READEa. 



INDIOATIVB. 



PRES.-il speak, Ac.) 

S. L6qu-or, -gris, -Itur, kc. 



IMHERF.— 
8. L5qu-ebar, &.&. 



FUT — 
S. L5qu-ar, -eris, &c. 



PEHF.— 

S. l5oflt-u8 sum, kc. 



i'LUPERF.- 
S. L5cut-us eram, &c. 



FUT. I'ERF.— 
S. L5cut-us ero 



DEPONENT 

THIRD CONJUGATION^ 



SUBJUNCTIVK. 



■^ may speak, <fca) 
L6qu-ar, -iris, kc. 



Loqn-cier, &c. 



Loouturud sim, kc 



Locut-us sim, ke. 



Locut-U8 essem, &c. 



Supine— Locut-ura. 



PRES.—a divide, Ac.) 

S. Part-ior, -Iris, -itur, kc. 



IMPERF.- 
S. Part-Iebar, &c. 



FUT.- 
S. Part-iar, -leris, &c. 



PERF.— 

S. Partit-us sum, &c. 



PLUPERF.— 
S. Partit-us erara, &c. 



FOURTH CONJUGATION- 



FUT. PERF.— 
8. Partit-us ero, &c. 



(I may divide, Ac.) 
Part-iar, -iaris, &c. 



Part-irer, &c. ^ 



Partitur-U8 sim, &c 



Partit-us sim, kc. 



Partit-us essem, &c. 



SupiNB — Partit-uiu. 



rUMT LATIN ItEADlfill. 



7A 



VERB S — con tin tied. 
L5qu-or, / speak 



IMPERATIVE. 



(Speak thou, Ac.) 

, L<5qu-gre, -Imini 



INFINITIVE. 



(To gpeuk, Ac) 

Lfiqu-i 



- , Loqu-itor, ko. 



PAKTIOIPtE. 



(Spuuklng, Ac.) 

I8qu-en8, &c. 



Locuturum esse, &c. 



Locut-um esse, kc. 



Locflt^rus^ra^c. 
Loquend.us,-a,.um,&a 

(Ki'qiililug to bespoken.) 



(Having spoken.) 
Locut-u8, -a, -um 



Gekund— Loqu-endum. 



Part-ior, I divide. 



(Divide thou, AC) I (To divide, Ac.) 

-, Part-Ire, -imlni.&c.Part-iri 



I (Dividing, Ac.) ] 

Part-iens, kc. 



-, Part-itor, &c. 



Partiturum esse, kc. 



Partit-um esse, &c. 



?H*^tH5[!!>j^ra^&c. 
PartiendMi87i;;.um,&c. 



Partit-us, -a, -um, &c. 



Gkbuni>— Puft-iendum. 



76 



FIRMT LATIN READKB. 



1. (Syktax) Rhlb XVII.- 7%. acnrntiv, in used to exprt^ 

altun oxstruxcrunt, M. aVtz^ur (.uUt a wall sut>, feet fU<;h. ^ 

2. (Syntax) HU.-.K XVIII..-7%, verbs utor, ubutor, fruor, fnn^or. 

/% t«.c/ ircw, ; Fungitur olUciis, heptrfonm hU diUies, 

^(Mt^,^ EXERCISE XXVI. 
Caesar militca horf«tur. Caesar, .nilitcs l,ortatus, in hostes pre. 
hcisc tur. Haec, qua. suj.ra scripta sunt, eo spectant, ut te horter , 
et suadeam. Pueros ad hmden, horteniur. Cornibus taiiri, apn Lrou^ 
dent.b,« se tutantur. gJTfeagnum conanmr. Me haec ag^ ^^^ 
<^.5,^conante,n <^it pudor. Lnperator legiones hortabatur, ne Mm A^ 
Merent PeccaU n.oa fatebor. Principes conabantur toti.is QalC ^ 
potm .♦ Gloria virtutem, tanquam umbra, sequitur. Homines vir- 
ute, non fortuna, n.etimur. Ca^^^torem libenter sequebantui. 
Itomani per Bntanniam iter facere conati sunt. Pater filium amplec- 

I, I T\ "^'"^ ^"^P^'""'* ''■^^ ™*^'"' Cons,d sic locutus, in , 
hostem profectus est. In Qalliam proficisoamur. Manibus, pedibus ^-^>^^ 
noctesque et d.es conati eranms. Haec a n>e sunt^ripia, lITte H-"" 

\TZ '*.'"'"''"^'"' "?.>^ ^''''^'- Exempla virorum fortiun. ^ 
sequsre. Cicero saepe nobiscuni de virtuto et de animo loquebatur 
Me, vel nnperatore vel milite, utimini. Caesar paucos dies in his 
OC.S moratiir, navium parandarum causa. Fi'liam lencru.n, dulce 
loquentem amplexus m pater. Comraius hospitio Ariovisti usus 
emt Fractarum naviura materia atque acre ad reliquas (naves) 
re6ciendas utebatur Caesar. ^ ' 

The general exhc.ted his soldiers to fight bravely, ^neas in 
vam endeavoured to embrace the shade (spirit) of bis wife. The bovs 
were enjoying the cool shade of the oak tree. Let us w llingly follow 

«lTiT '"^ r'^ ^'''^''- "^^'^ ^°^^' h'^^i^g thus spoken, 
attacked the enemy's camp. The Helvetii were endeavouring td 
J-^rce a passage through the province against Caesar's wUl. (ie 
Caesar bemg uuwUling.) Let us endeavour to make ourselves mas- 
ters of the whole of Gaul. The chiefs will endeavour to lead the 
army across the Rhine. The Roman, followed glory. On the same 
d ^aesar set out from the camp, and has tened into Italy. 
• A 'ior oAeu govcrus tUe genlttv«i, aa here. 



5 



\^' totaiii 
ta ])edc3 

, fiin^or, 
tiir jujTo, 



itcs {)n»- 
e horter 

!C agere , 
\e fidfinj /^A-^C 
GalliiM) '^ 
nes vir- 
sbantuT. 
implec- 
itus, in , 



FIRST r^TIN READER. 



77 



S. (Syntax) Rule XIX.- »'/,«, motion toward- y, ,rpre.»ed th. 
miiw* of tmoTU, and islands are ,mt in ti ^-frtMed, tht 



fixW^ 



./ 



A, ^, EXERCISE XXVII. i, 

Athf .. n, „.*.,., _. , i'Tf*' ""^^'^ Pers.ae legates n.isemntr^^ 



, ut te 
fortium 
ebatur. 
in his 
dulce 
ti usiis 
(naves) 

leas in 
le boys 
follow 
poken, 
ing to 
, {i.e., 
I mas- 
ui the 
I same 



^- 



"id Ca=sari, r„pi« ™ 'Cit ^ ' f P™'""»«>'™ittcret, 
. «it Dnmnorigi, ut i.iora c.,.,„fetur XS l„2^f'^ p '""™"- 

The boys returned to Athens along with their fatl.nr Ti u- ^ 

'ions. Let ,.s loan, to JZZ ^r T^ Xelr ^"^ 
"J^' '^^ ^^6 v*^''*t ^^e may see) our parents. 

• Ar<."Iert" Id equHl to «<n<m. 



lo.'Tun^y 



Hi 



78 



nnST LATIN RP;^T^|l:K. 



SECTION XVIII. - 

The following V«rhH differ from the paradigms already given, either 

adding the inflexions 



fi 1 



it 



i il I 




I 






ESSE, to be. Principal 



IHDIOATIVB. 



PRES.— (I Atn, Ac> 

S. Sum, Eb, Est 

P. Bilmaa, Estis, Sunt 



BUBJDNOTIVK. 



n may be, Ac) 
Sim, Sis, Sit 
SlmuB, SItiB, Sint 



IMPERF.—d WM, Ac.) 
S. Eram, Eras, Erat 
P. ErSmus, Eratis, Erant 



FUT.—{1 shall or will be, Ac.) 
S. £ro, ErU, Erit 

P. ErImuB, ErItiB, Ernnt 



(I mlKht or should be, Ac) 
EBsem, Esses, Esset 
Essemus,! Essotis, Essent 



PERF.—{\ liave been, Ac) 
S. Ftii, i'uiBti, Fuit 
P. FiiimuB, FuiatiB, Fuerunt, or 

FuSre 



PLUPERF.-(l had been, Ac) 
S. Fii-eram, -eras, -erat 
P. Fu-eramus, -eratis, -erant 



(I may bo about to be, Ac) 

FuturuB Bim, Futurua bIb, 

Futurus Bit 
Futuri BimuB, Futuri bUIb, 

Futuri Bint 



(I may have been, Ac) 
Fu-erim, -eris, -erit « 
Fu-erlmufl, -erltiB, -erint 



(I mlKht or should have been, Ac) 
Fu-issem, -isses, -isset 
Fu-issemus, -issetis, -issent 



FUT. PERF.—(l shall have been, Ac) 
S. Fu-ero, -eris, -erit 
P. Fu-erlmus, -erftis, -erint 



• Like ««m are declined Its compounds, absvm, "lam away from;" adaum, "I 

a rf In those parts in Mhlch the simple vert begins 
t Fortm, firrri, /f>rat. Ac, are often used instead of eatem. Ac 



FIRHT LATIN RKADER. 



ra 



IRREOULAR VERBS. 

In t.e »^.er of forcing the Perreet and «upi„, or in the ™ode of 

PA.RTS— Sum, Fui, Esse.* 



IMPKRATIVE, 



(Be thou, &0.) 
-, £8 

~, Este 



(Thou Shalt be, Ac) 
— , Esto, Eato 

-, EatSte, Sunto 




(To bo about to be.) 
Futtlr-um ) 

am > eaaei 

um ) 



(To have been.) 

Fuisse 



(About to be.) 
Futflr-U8, -j 

--a, -a© 

um, -i, &c. 



1 ror, u one., uwd inrtead of^//,^,m f^„ 



I 



il 



If' 



Jii. 



m 


1 - 


1 


1 ' 


H 


■ 


11 


1 ' - 



! 



80 



rillMT I.\TIN ItKADKU, 



IRREOULAR VERBS ronfimwd, 

roSSUM, / ,tm„/>fc 

T\mum In : mnponndud of ;»,i/., (ho stiMii of (ho ndjoodvo pofiit, " nhio," nm] 
t»m, •' I mn," Whonovor (ho |mr(«» of ginn hoKiii with nn c, (ho < tii 
^wr U rotnlno.l ; liii(. whon (hoy hoKin with h, tlio t in n^Niiiiihitoil to »; 
nx, /xi< At, /•<•/ (•»•((»« ; hii( /Hw<((,« (\ir /Htf .turn, jumiiii I'or /tot niin. In 
Iho jioiloi'( i.iiil (lofivod toiiNOM, (lio / of /'«/ in oml(toi| ; iih. ;«tf h» for 
j-o/./id*. Tho lm|H«mtivo U wuii(ii\u:, iiml iho I'n-Mi-iit Piirtitiiplo, jnihun, 
h unoil an iiM iiilji'otivo. /\;.«r is fur yot cvt,'. 

Viwmnvxh Parts — rossum. Potni, Posmo. 



INDIOATIVK. 



/'A'A'.S. (I mn Milo, .t»v) 
r. Posnttmns, rotc-^tis, Possnnt 



S. I't^t ornm, -ovum, tnit 
r. l'»\t-orAuiUf«, -Ki-tttiH, -ornnt 



UriUirNCTIVK. 



S. PSt-pro, -oris, -orit 

r. Pot-orimus, -orltU, -oruni 



t*KKf\--{\ hnvo »>(>iMi ttliln, Ai-,) 
S. Potu-l. -istl, -it 
r. Potu-imus, -istia, -orunt, or 
-ere 



(I II IV liimhlfl. .ti'.) 
Pnanini, Poadln PoNRit 
Podntmnii, PoasUlu, Po««lnt 

(I loliilit or ithoiilil \w iililo, An\) 

I'OSM 0111, -OH, -Ot 

l^w^^-^^llu^s, -o(i«, -out 



^c«!',are?!SJSSB!isra 



(I mny liiivo lioim «^>I^ .tpo.) 
Potu-orim, -oris, -orit 
Potu-orTmus, -orltis, -orint 



rrJ'PKKr.' (\ hml \w<?n nitlo. *c.) 
J<. Potu-oram, -orus, -or«t 
v. Potu-orttimis, -oriitis, -oraiit 



i^rr. rK!ir-(\ dhniniuvolitUMinblo, 

S, l*otu om, -t»ris, -orit 

P. P.idi-or^iUHs, -otitis, -oiint 



(I niljtlit hftvo lipoii nlilo, iVc.) 
Potu issoiii, -isfos, -issot 
Potii-issoinns, -Issctia, issoiit 



iNriNiTivr, 
PKRF. Potu-isae. fo A«iiv '.«<« nhU, 




'HINT I.ATJN llRAriKIl. 



81 



r 



IRREODLAK VERBS .:„„„,. 

r'm.av.uVM^ V, „„, ,v„n,i. 1V.„1,.«<., 



INDtCATIVK. 



"UIIJUNOTIVK. 



«■ rr«-.,„„, p,„rt.„., r,„,,.„.' ,„.,■'""' ;■"" '". *« 



IMl'IHih'. (I vviw unoftil 10. A,.,) 
'• 1 rod (VAnniN, .uufiH, .„r«iit 



«. Prod-oro, -orli, -erit 

r^ Prod-orlmui, -ortciK, -orunt 

S. Prfifti-I, -lati, -It 

r. Profu.Imu., .i,tl», .«runt, .,• 
-ero 

M««ftll to, Ac) 

H. lVon,-oro, -oris, -orit 

' • I roliMiriHms, -oritiH, -orint 



'•"l«hH,r»l,o«|,|ba„m,ri,lto. *o) 

I r<>( „«H(.ln, .«HN(,H, .OONdt 

a "lay l,„ „|„mt to'bu '..^..'^.irt'i.y^to 

, Pro'uturu. ilm. sli, alt 
.?I°?^^_' f" "« «^tl8, tint 

(I m»y hav« been niemi to, Ac.) 
Profii-erlm, .eri», -erit 
Profti-erlmua, erltla, erint 



(I nilKht Imvo bo„„ „„.f„, ^ ^^. ^ 

IVoC'I-iHHnm, -iHN.W, -JHSot 




ruKs.- 



S. — , Prod.o8to, Prod-flgto 
i • — , Prod-e«tote, Pro-«unto 

Proftttttr-uB, a, um 



('J'o bo uaofiil to.) 
Prod-osae 

(To bo ftboiit to bo UMfiiu^) 
Proftitur-um ) 

am f esae, or Profor«. 
nm 



— — wm 



^ AAA. do huvo boeii u,«fm to.) 

■i iGiU IS56 



(> 



82 



FIRST LATIN JJEADER. 




IRREGULAR 

EO, / go. Principal Parts 

So belongs to the Fourth Conjugation. Its stem, -t, becomes -e before 
indicative eo for to ; 3d plural present eunt for iunt. The imperfect 



INDICATIVE, 



PRES.—(l go, or am going, <fcc.) 
S. Eo, Is, It 
P. Imns, Itis, £aiic 



IMPERF.—([ was going, <fcc.) 
S. Ibam, Ibas, Ibat 
P. Ibamus, Ibatia, Ibant 



FUT.—{1 shall or will go, Ac.) 
S. Ibo, Ibis, Ibit 
F. Ibimus, Ibitis, Ibant 



PERF.—(l have gone, Ac) 
S. Iv-i, -isti, -it, &c. 



SUBJUNCTIVE. 



(I may go, Ac) 
£am, Eas, £§,t 
Eamus, Eatis, Eant 



(I might, Aa, go, A&) 
Irem, Ires, Iret 
Iremus, Iretis, Irent 



(I may be about to go, Ac.) 
Iturus sim, Itunis sis, &c. 



PLUPERF.—il had gone, Ac.) 
S. Iv~eram, -eras, &c. 



FUT. PERF.—O. shall have gone, Ac) 
S. Iv-ero, -eris, &c. 



(I may have gone, Ac) 
Iv-erim, -eris, -erit, &c. 



(I might have gone, Ac) 
Iv-issem, -isses, &c. 



BupiNE — I'^um, Itu. 

Note (1.) That eo has a passive voice only in the 3d singular ; as, itur, " it 
" to go away ;" ineo, " to enter ;" recko, *' to return," &c.) are conjugated 
are usually contracted into ti, iisti [isti). (3.) That some of the compounds 

FIO, I am 'iiiade, or / become. Principal 

Fio serves as the Passive Voice of facto, " I 



PRES.—(l become, Ac) 
S. Fio, Fis, Fit 
P. Fi-mus, Fi-tis, Fi-unt 


vl may become, Ac) 
Fi-am, -as, -rt 
Fi-amus, -atis, -ant 


IMPERF.-(l became, Ac) 
S. Fl-ebam, -ebas, &c. 


(I might become, Ac.) 
Fl-erem, -eres, &c. 


FUT.— a shall become, Ac) 
S. Fi-am, -es, -St, &c. 





FIEST LATIN READllB. 



83 



VERB S — continued. 
— Eo, Ivi, itum, Ire. 

IMPERATIVE. ~ 



(Oo thou, Ac.) 

-, Ite 




lens, Euntis 
lens, Euntis 
lens, Euntis 




(Thou Shalt go, <fea) 
-, Ito, Ito 
-, Itote, Eunto 



(To be about to ga) 
Itur-um ) 

&m \ esse 

^um ) 

(To have gone, 4c.) 
Iv-isse 



'.bout to go.) 
Itilr^v . -i 
Itur-a, -ae 
Itur-um, -i, &c. 



„ ^ „ ., GisEUND— Eundum, Eundi, &c 

Parts — Fio, Factus sum, Flgri 

(Become thou.) 
—, Fite 



Flgri 



(To becoma) 



(To be about to become.) fci^i;:^;:;:;^^ | 

Factum iri J»e ^ade or to becoma) 

' JFaciend-u8, -i 
Faciend-a, -ae 
i Faoiend-um, -i, &c. 



84 



nilMT LATIN IlKAUKK. 



;l 



iNiMiu'nvn. 



I'KHf. (I httva iHit'uiiio, Ao.) 
H. FMtui ■um, Fuotui U, ka. 



8. F««itiii» warn, KuctuM orH«, Ao, 



Ac) 
8. Knolun fro, I''iu\t««« ortH, i<-c. 



IRREGULAR 

MillJIINlVriVN. 



(I limy Imvii biuutitin, Ac.) 
Fttotui slm, Fnotui tli, ko. 



(I niltfliti Imvii bi<(<nin«, Ac.) 

l<'HOtllM flltNnilt, I'^AOlllH (iNXiCIt, &0. 



If I !• 1 



FKItO, / hrlnif or Imtr. TMuncii'AL 

7'Vn) itt of tliu Tlilnl ('oi\iiiKii(i<iii, but Ih irroKuliir in tlin rort'oot mill 
tU\n*,/ert for/«ir-»-#,/«)rl (or fifr-i-t, /em {or fMt^-re, 

ACTIVE 



l*HKS. (1 lu>»r, Ac.) 

8. FXro. F«r«i. F«rt 

r. Ffir-IiuuB, For-tli, For~unt 



WPKRF.d WM bwving, Ac.) 
8. Fi<r<db«in, -abas, &o. 



tUr. (V iltuH or win liour, Ac.) 
8. Fer-am, -ts, -«t, &». 



Jf»ifiW.— (I h»T« borne, Ao.) 
8. Tfil-i, -isti, -it 
P. Tftl-ImuB, -iitii,-enjnt,«>r-er« 



riVI'KRF. (I liiul lioniP, Ae.) 
a. Tftl-i^raiu, -eras, &c. 



L 



FUT. rKRF. (I Nhiili Imvo Imrno, Ac.) 
8. Tul-pro, -oris, v*ko. 



(I limy linar, Ao,; 

FerHim, -ns, -ftt, ^o. 



(I mlKlit lioiir, Ac) 
Fer-rom, -ran, -rot, &o. 



(I limy Ixi nlioiit to boar, Ac.) 
LilturuB ■!!», ila, &o. 



(I m%y hATO bnrna, A«s.) 
Tiil-8rim, -erU, -erit, &c. 



(1 nil({lit liiivb boriio, Ac.) 
Tnl-i-isoni, -iHsas, &o. 



BuriMK— Lat-uiii, I^tu. 



k._J. 






KrilMT I.ATfN ItWAIilCtt. 



80 



VERB 8 — cnntinvrd. 
or / hfcon^ tuvUinued. 



IMI'HIUTIVH. 



INriNITIVM. 



(T«> Imvo bucdina.) 
Faot-um \ 
——-am > flBie 
•—-urn ) 



PARTIOIPt,!, 

(IlatltiK bmiuiiio.) 
FllOt-UB, -i 

Vaot«ft , -ae 
Faot-um, -1, fcfl. 



Pauth— F«ro, I'dli, r/itum. Form 

l^^rru, (2(1 «in«ul.ir promuit paMHJv,,) ((.r/cr-ij-m, &o. 
VOIOK. 



(Iltidr tliuu, Ac.) 
, For 
, Far-te 



Far-ra 



(I'o bom-.) 



Criiiiu Nlmlt bour.) 
, For-to, Fejvto 
, For-tote, For-unto 



(H(inilti;{,) 

Fer-oni, -entii 
For-ons, -ontJi 
For-oiiB, -ontii, &«. 



(To be About to buiir.) 
Latur-um 




(About to boar,) 
Latur-U8, -I 
Latur~a, -ae 
Latur-uir, -t 



(To havo bortio.) 



(irMLSj — Fcrcud uui, -j, &«. 



i 



n 



86 



Fifi8T LATIN llEADEA. 



IRREGULAR 

FSror, Latus 
PASSIVE 



INDIOATIVK. 



PRES.—(I am borne, Ac.) 
S. Th-OT, Fer-rig, Fer-tur 
r. Fer-Imur, -Imini, -untur 



IMPERF.— a was borue, Ac) 
S. Fer-ebar, -ebiris, &o. 



B0BJUNOTIVK. 



(I uiny bo bonio, Ac) 
Fer-aif. ario, -&tur 
Fer-amur, -imlni, -antur 



FUT.—d shall be borne, Ac) 
S. Fer-ar, -Sria, -5tur, &c 



PBRF.—{1 have been bonie, Ac) 
S. L&tus sum, Latus es, &c. 



(I might be borne, Ac) 
Fer-rer, -reria, -retur, &c 



PLUPERF.—{\ had boen borne, Ac) 
S. Latus eram, eras, &c. 



(I may have been borne, Ac) 
Latus -sim, Latus sis, &c. 



(I might have been borne, Ac) 
Latus essem, esses, &o. 



FUT. PERF.-d shall have been 
borne, Ac) 

S. Latus ero, eris, &o. 



In the same way are conjugated 



Atfero (ud fero) 
Eflfero (e or ex fero) 
Perfero ^jer fero) 



Attuli 
Extuli 
PertuU 



KinST LATIN liEADltK. 



87 



V£RB S — continued. 

6UU1, Ferd 

VOICE. 



IMPERATIVK. 



INKINITIVR. 



PARTIOIPLK. 



(He thou bonie.) 
-, Fer-re 
-, Fer-imini 



(Thou Shalt bo borne.) 
-, Fer-tor, Fer-tor 
- Fer-emini, Fer-un- 
tor 



(To bo boriio.) 
Fer-ri 



(To be about to bo boina) I (RcqnlrlnR to be borne.) 
Latum iii Ferend-uB, 4 

Ferend-a, -ae 
Ferend-um, -i, &c 



(To have been borne.) 
Lat-um ) 



-am > esse 
-um ) 



(Borne.) 
lat-us, -i 
I at-a, -ae 
Lat-um, -i, <feo. 



the compounds of Fero , 



Ailatum 
2latum 
I'ur latum 



Afferre. 
Efferre. 
Ptsrftirre, A'tc &c. 



M 



88 



FIRST LATIN READKIl. 



tr* >' 



/ 




'i:3 



1. (Syntax) Rule XXl—TJie infinitive mood usiuiUu depcmU^ 
en another verb ; as, Cupio disccro, / ain eaqer to learn 

2. (SYNTAX) Rir,,K XXII.- 7%. mhject to 'a verb in the tn/nititr 
mood upnt in the accimative; as, IIostks pauakb bellum vidct, 
Ac sees that the enemy are prqmring {for) war 

3. (Syntax) Rulb XXIII.-yA. compounds of sum, except pos- 
mm govern the dative; as, I«terfuit praelio, he was present at the 

EXERCISE XXVIII. 

Caesar vir magnus ct clams f.iit. Nonno in horto fiiistis agri- 
colae? Nonno in horto^fmstia^ agricolae? Nunquara deerit tibi 
la'.is, 81 probus fucria. Av^ Ciocronis actatcm oratores mnlti atque 
,^clarifacnnit. Ante belhira Punicnm secundum iniperatores nmlti 
M clan fuerant, ncc postea dcfucrunt. Multia praeliis interfuerant 
milites. Divitiacus copiis iEduonun praefuit. Si Caesar ipse equi- 
tatui praefuisset, hostes non eflfugisscnt. 

Beatus esse sine virtute potest nemo. Mons altissimus impendet, 
ut facile perpauci prohibero hostes possint. Mons altissimus im- 
pendebat, ut facile perpauci prohibere hostes possent. Romani con- 
sequi hostes non potuerunt. Divitiacus plurimum poterat apud 
suos cives Possunt, quia posse videntur. Non est dubium quin*^,^ y, 
totius Galhae plurimum Ilelvetii possint. Viri boni slimus, si iiu ^'^^'■ 
prosunuis, quibus (jvodesse) possumus. Caesar negat se posse iter ^^um^u/ 
ulli per provinciara dare. Qui possum facere quod quereris ? Califs (^ 

non potuit attingere cibum, quern petebat. 

You cannot be happy without virtue. If you are (jires. suhj) 
rich, you uill never want friends ; (?'. ,;., friends will never be wanting 
to you.) Labienus commanded Caesar's cavalry. Labienus, as lieii^ 
tenant-general, was in charge of the camp. Our soldiers were not 
able to repulse the enemy. Caesar's ships had not been able to 
rea^h the island. Divitiacus was very powerful at home (domi) 
and m the rest of Gaul. The king who had been given (them) 
was useless. The dogs were not able to reach the flesh which they 
were aiming at. Let us be useful to all our friends. Cicero had been 
of great service to the state. 






A^v^, 









* Qi/m Is eqimlto ,7«i (old ablatlvo ot quis) and non or ne, and means literally 
1.1 what mantier, not,- or "liow, not" It is usually translated, " but that." and 
u generally followed by the subjunctive. 



riBST LATIN KEADKK. 



petids 

nitive 
vidct, 

■ pos- 
at the 



89 



tigri- 
; tibi 
itqiie 
nulti 
jraiit 
equi- 

idet, 

im- 

con- 

ipnd 

il lis 
iter ,'' 
anis 



ibj.) 
ting 
ieii- 
not 
J to 
mi) 
em) 
hey 
een 



-•/ 



-^^u>a.\ 



illy, 
and 



/ ' EXERCISE XXiy . 

Que^s'liu tl^o''""!*"''^!-^'"' "'" CSnt/"Anlu« fert tales n.ices- 

que sinu laxo. Iniprobi cives arma contra patriam fenint. Aura ^^^ ^^*-^ 

Multa tul.t fecitquo puer. FInnicn lUicnus Jongo spatio per fines 
Germanorum fertur. Quodvis pete I^M.^\.. t'Lnte 
fera.. Sapiens nomen in.sani ferat. T^Wctii adn.irati sunt, Cae- 
^arem injunas tam din in.puno tulisse. Ariovistus tantam ar;ogan. 
t^^m sumpserat, nt ferendns non videretur. Lupus causam Si 
ntuht. S^ res adversaa milu forttzna imposuisset, animo aequo 

u~ '"f ^''""'^ ^^- ^«^i ferebantrco 

cum pecuma. Rana quaedam caput e stagno profcrt. Canis per I 

tern putabat^ Leo m.probus totam praedam abstulit. Eodcn 

ruloT'"''T:"'"''""^^^*- CaesarinuntiatumestAriovstn 
I opulo Romano bellum iiitulisse. 



The boy was not able to bear the pain of the disease. The Hel- 

and trrot •'" TZ '' '"' '^^^''' ^^'"^ ^''^' '' ^^e wretched 
il Tr^T-^'^- .J^'T """ ^^^ injuries with contented 

.n/.) against he gods. The farmei^s son used to cany apples and 

nl" I Tb 'r f'^1 \f '^^ "^^^^- ^^* ^'^^ -" ^- ^^'f^ ^- ' 
1 1 1 .' ^'"^' ''''" ^^SC (>^. ;..r/:) war on the Ronmns, the 
consuls wd hasten over the Alps with the legions. All the baggage 

aMr.f Tf '' ■"'' '"^ ^''''- '^^' '^'"^^^^ had waged wS 
agmnst their fellow-citizens. Some dogs swimming over a river 

canning flesh saw their own forms in the clear wat^r. The whole 

Helvetian state waged war on the Romans with all their Ircel 

Let wjse „en receive (bear) the name of fools. The ships were borne 

over the sea with a favouring breeze. Caesar bo-, for a long time 

the injuries of (..., done by) the HelvetiL Rich men ar. able The 

f low^itizens. There is no doubt but that Caesar is able to make 
nunself master of all Gaul. 



the Il^L'"^rZLl' eT'"'' "--' *° '''"'*'-" '^^"••'•«' P'"""- = •''-■'' -PP"ea ta 
- - ji_.e ii,.^.g^ auu. Hirers 10 zai Jn-jnm of live tumi. 



.m^.M*'t 



90 



FIKHT LATIN KKAnKU. 



XBBEGULAR 
vOlo, / 

Tliirt verb U Irregular In tho present Indiciitiyo uml 
PlUNCU'AL PaUTH — 



IMDIOATIVI. 



0U1UUNUTIVK. 



/'/iA'A (I luii wlUliiv, iko.) 

H. vaio, Vli, Vult 

p. VSlflmui, Vultii, VSlnnt 



(I niKy bt< wllltiiK, Ac) 
V«l-lin, -Is, -It 
V8l-Imui, -itii, -Int, ko.. 



lSil'KliF:—(l wna wIIHuk, Ac.) 
S. Vol-Obain, -obas, &o. 



(I inlKlit bo willing, Jiv.) 
Vol-lom, -lej*, -lot, &o. 



Fl'T.—(l tliall bo Mrllllim, Ac.) 

S. V61-am, -i», -et, &o. 



rtiRF—d have been wlUliiK. Ac) 
S. VSia-l, -l«ti, -it, ke. 



(I may ImYU boon wlUlutf, Aa) 
Voln-erim, -6rU, ka. 



I'LUPKJiF. -(I UtiiX boon willliiK, Aa) 
S. V51u-or«iu, -eras, &o. 



(I iiiIkIU havo boon willing, Ac) 
Volu-is8uin, -iasca, &c. 



rUT. J'HJiK- (1 almll Imvo boon 
willing, Ac) 

8. V51u-ero, -eris, &o. 




NOLO, lam 
Sato is composod of no or noti, " not," and 

PiiiNciPAL Parts — 



/'AA'&— (I am unwiUiuff, Ac) 
S. Nfilo, Non-vis, Non-vult 
P. Kfilumaa, Non-viiltia, Nolunt 



JMPERr.—{\ VM unwIUhiK, Ac.) 
S. Nol-obam, -obas, -«bat, &c. 



(I niny bo unwilling, Ac) 
N51-im, -is, -It 
N51-Imas, -itis, -iut 



(I might bo unwilling, Ac) 
^^li-lem, -lo.s, -let, &c. 



/'L'T.—(l Hhiill bo unwilling, ic) 
8. Ndl-am, -68, -at 



KIRH'i t ATIN HKADttlt 



91 



V X B B S — continued. 




am ^ifUlimj, 




prtwmt Inflnltivts aiul the tciwos durlvwl fr.,ui 


then I. 


V61o, V61ui, VQ\h 




IMl'KRATIVK 


IWUNITIVK. 


PAKTIOIPLM. 


— 


(To bo wUUinf.) 

Voile 


(Willing.) 
Volens 


— . 




VolontiB, &o. 


• -. 




— 




(To liavB been willing.) 




Volu-iase 




• 


• 


— 


■ 




,.._ 



iiMtrilling. 

t>iilo; tho first Hyllal.lo is therefore long. 

Nolo, Nolui, Nolle. 



(!»o thou unwllliiiK.) 
-, Noli 
— , NSlIte 



(Thou Bhiilt bo unwilling.) 
-, N61Ito, Nolito 
-, NSlitote, Noluuto 



(To bo unwilling.) 
NdUe 



(Unwilling.) 
Noleus 
Nolentis, &c. 




IMAGE EVALUATION 
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92 



FIRST lATIN READEB. 



IRREGULAR 

NOLO, / am 



INDICATIVK. 


BUBJUNCTIVE. 


PERF.—{1 have been unwilling, Ac.) 
S. N61u-i, -isti, -it, &c. 


(r may have been unwilling, Ac.) 
Nolu-erim, -eris, &c. 


PLUPERF.—d liad been unwilling, Ac.) 
S. Nolu-eram, -eras, &o. 


(I might have been unwilling, Ac) 
Nolu-issem, -isses, &c 


PUT. PERF.—{\ shall have been 
unwilling, Ac.) 

S. Nolu-ero, -eris, &c. 





MALO, 1 am 

Mdlo is composed of magia or mage, " more," 

PuiNciPAL Parts — 



PRES.—(l am more willing, Ac.) 
S. Halo, Mavis, Mavnlt 
P. Maliimus, Mavnltis, Malunt 

IMPERF.-(l WHS h. re willing, Ac) 
S. Mal-ebam, -ebaa, &c. 



FUT.—il shall be more willing, Ac) 

S. Mal-am, -es, -et, &c. 



PERF.—(l have been more willing, Ac) 
S. M51n-i, -isti, -it, &c. 



PLUPERF.—^I had been more 
willing, Ac) 

S. Malu-eram, -eras, &c. 



(I may bo more willing, Ac) 
Mal-im, -Is, -it 
Mal-imus, -Itis, -int 



(I might be more willing, Ac) 
Mal-lcm, -les, -let, &c. 



(I may have been more willing, «c) 
Malii-erim, -eris, &c. 



(I might have been more willing, 
Ac) 

Jl^lu-issem, -isses, &c. 



FUT. PERP—(\ shall have been n-ore 

willing. Ac) 
S. Malu-ero, -eris, &c. 






PTRST LATIN READER. 



98 



VERBS— <^tinued. 
unwiUing — continued. 



IMPERATIVB. 



IKFINITIVB. 



(To have been anwllling.) 
Noluisse 



PARTIOIPLB. 




more willing. 

and »ofo, and has the first syllable long. 

Malo, Malui, Malle. 



(To be more willing.) 

Halle 



(To have been more 
willing.) 

Malu-isee 



94 



FIRST LATIN READER. 



lii 



I 



I 



I 



Non eadem volo senex, quae volui adolescens. Quia noluistis ves- 

a,t^^ ^™™ ^®""® ^J^iilira, malum pjerferte. Nfllijipntiiy^ Ifolite, judices, 

v^^ de me ita existimare. Quod^Iiimas, libenter crftjlf fflii^:^ ftlem velle 

et idem nolle, ea firma amicitia est. Nosti* ingenium mulierum; 

nolunt, ubi veJis,— ubi nolis, cupiunt ultro. Nemo, me nolente, pecu- 

niam Aulo raeo auferet. Iracundia non vult regi. Caesar ab Hel- 

vetiis discedere nolebat. Si vis amari, ama. Stultus corvus, dum 

vocem ostendere vult, emisit ore caseum. Noli coram pluribus cani- 

bus panem cruore tinctura mittere, ne nos vivos devorent. Dum 

r^viUtinflare bese validius, rupto jacuit corpore. Noli imputare 

y vanufa^eneficium mihl Quum mustela, ab homine prensa, in- 

AvuVv./ Ptantem necem effugere vellet ; parce, inquit, mihi, quae domum tibi 

iiiol<3Stis muribus purgo. Senex asino suadebat fugere, ne possent 

capi. Hydrus ranas singulas aspero dente corripere coepit.t Gracu- 

lus ad proprium genus redire coepit maerens. Si voluisses pati quod 

natora dederat, banc repulsam non sentires. 

A lion was anxious to go-a-hunting, {l e., to hunt,) with a donkey 
for a companion. The stag begins to run over {per) the plain. The 
foolish crow was anxious to show oflF its voice. The enemy began to 
assemble from all pares. The inhabitants began to cultivate the 
fields. Ambassadors were sent to Rome to the senate, to sue for 
peace. The enemy began to retreat. The soldiers, worn out {de- 
fessus) with wounds, had begun to retreat. Don't be at all (imperat. 
of nolo) afraid ; (t. «., do not fear.) We know {novi) the wisdom of 
Socrates, (and) the justice of Aristides. The citizens began to build 
a new city. *• 



SECTION XIX. 

DEFECTIVE VERBS. 

1. Defective Verbs are those which want some of their parts. 
Thus, volo, rmlo, &c., are not only Irregular, but also Defective 
Verbs. The following, however, are more largely defective, since they 
either want the present and derived tenses, or have only a few 



• y<M«, for novUHf perfect of notco, but often translated as a present 
next page. t For coepi^ see next page. 



Se€ 



See 



FIHST LATIN READER. 



96 



isolated parts, principally of the present stem. Thus, coepi, « I begin •" 
numtni, "I remember;" 6di, "I hate;" and nm, « I know," have 
only the /)<?r/,?rf (preterite) tense and the forms derived from it: from 
which circumstance they are sometimes called Preteriiive Verbs. 

2. The perfects are translated as presents, the pluperfects as per- 
fects indefinite or imperfects, and the future perfects as futures. 
The reason of this change is evident when we remember that inem- 
zm literally means, " I have called to mind," i. e., " I remember •" 
odi, " I HAVB conceived a hatred," i. e., « I hate," &c 



INDICATIVE. 
PERFECT. 



Coepl. 
Goep-istl. 
Coep-it, &C. 


Mgmln-I. 6d-I. 
Mgmln-istl. Od-isti. 
Memln-it, &c. Od-it, &c. 


NSv-I. 
Nov-isti. 
>76v.it, &c. 


Coep-lram 


PLUPERFECT. 
Memln-eram. 6d-eram. 


Ndv-eram. 


Coep^ro. 


FUTURE PERFECT. 

Uemln-ero. Od-Sro. 
SUBJUNCTIVE. 


N8v-«ro. 


Coep-grim. 


PERFECT. 

Mgmln-grim. Od-grim. 


Nov-Srim. 


Coep-issem. 


PLUPERFECT. 
Mgmln-issem. 0>d-issem. 

IMPERATIVE. 
FUTURE. 


Nov-issem. 



S. Memen-to. | P. Mgmen-t5to 



Coep-isse. 

Coep-tTis. 
Coep-tflms. 



INFINITIVE. 
Memin-isse. 6d-isse. 



N8v-i88e. 



PARTICIPLES. 

PERFECT. 

6-SU8 {obsolete.) (NC-tttB.) 

FUTURE. 

Q-ttxViM. 



! 

I , 

•'I i 

:l I 



96 



FIRST LATIN RBADEE. 



"f 



3. Ajo or aiOf " I say," " I say yes," has only the following 
parts :— 



PRESENT INDICATIVE. 
S. Ajo, A!8, Alt. 
P. ~, — , Aiunt. 

IMPERFECT INDICATIVE. 

S. Aiebtm, Aiel>as, Aiebat. 
P. AiebamuB, Aiebatis, Aiebant. 



PRESENT SURJUNCTIVS. 

S. — , Aias, Aiat. 
P. — , — , Aiant. 

PARTICIPLE PRESENT. 
Aiens, affirming. 



4. Inquam^ " I say," is likewise very defective. Of inqv/im it 
must be noticed, (1) that it is only used (like our " says I") in quot- 
ing the words of a person ; and (2) that it never stands as the first 
word of a clause : — 



INDICATIVE. 



PRESENT. 

S. Inqaam, Inquis, Inquit. 

P. Inqnlmas, Inqultis, Inqniont. 

PERFECT. 
S. , Inqoisti, Inquit. 



S. 



IMPERFECT. 
-, , Inquiebat. 

FUTURE. 
-, Inqoies, Inquiet, 



IMPERATIVE. 
Pres. Sing. Inque. | Put. Sing. Inqulto. 



SECTION XX. 

_ IMPERSONAL VERBS. 

1. Impersonal Verbs are used only in the third person singular, and 
have no personal subject— i. «., have no substantive or substantive 
pronoun as their subject. They are like the English phrases, i. 
snows, it rains, it happens, &c. 

2. The third singular of regular verbs is sometimes used imper« 
sonally ; as, accidit, " it happens," from accido, " I fall in with," 
" happen on." 

3. The following refer to the weather and certain natural pheno- 
mena:— 



FIRST LATIN READER. 



97 



Floit, it rains. 
Ningit, it snows. 
Grandlnat, it hails. 
Lapidat, or lapidatum est, stones 
fail from heaven. 



Laoeacit and illuoesoit, it dawns. 
Fulgiirat and falmlnat, it lightens. 
Tonat, it thunders.* 
Vesperascit and advesperaioit, it 

grows dark. 



4. The following six, referring to feelings of the mind, take the 
accusative of the person experiencing the feeling ; as, Miseretmetui 
« I pity you," (literally, « It pities me of you") :— ' 



MIsgret (me), I pity; perf. miserit- 
am est, misertiuu est, or miser- 
nit. 

Plget(me), I regret; perf. piguit, 
or pigitam est. 

Jiroenltet (me), / re/pent; perf. poen- 
itnit. 



Piidet (me), / am ashamed; perf. 

puduit, or puditum est. 
Taedet (me), / am disgusted; perf. 

pertaesum est, and rarely taed- 

uit. 
Oportet (me), it is necessary for me, 

1 must; perf. oportuit. 



5. Some have a substantive as their subject, and are used' in the 
the third plural, with a neuter plural as subject; as, Parimm parva 
decent : — 



Decet (me), it becomes me; pert. 

dScuit. 
Dedgcet (me), it does not become me; 

perf, dedecuit. 
Liquet, it is obvious; perf. lieuit. 



LIbet, or lubet (raihi), / like, 
choose; perf. libuit, or UbJtum 
est. 

licet (mibi), 7 am permitted; perf. 
lieuit, or llcltum est. 



6. Some personal verbs are used impersonally in the third person 
smgular, and with a meaning more or less different from that of the 
personal forms : — 



Interest and refert, it is of impor- 
tance to. 

Accldit, evenit, contingit, or fit, 
it happens. 

Accedit, it is added to, or in addi- 
tion to. 

Attinet and pertlnet (ad), it con- 
cerns or pertains to. 

CondHcit, it is conducive, 

Convgnit, it suits. 

Constat, it is known or established. 

Ezpedit, it is expedient. 



Delectat and jiivat (me), it delights 
me. 

Fallit, fiigit, and praeterit (me), 
it escapes me. 

Placet, it pleases, perf. plicuit, or 
pl&citam est. 

Praestat, it is better. 

Restat, it remains. 

Vacat, it is wanting. 

Est, in the sense of licet, it is per- 
mitted. 



Ja ^"^"f ^^T "^ °<^*=*»iona"y used " personaL TOu. we find Juviur tmal- 
and In a flguraUve seuse, orator tonat. "^y^^ lonai, 

(138) 7 



98 



FIRST LATIN READER, 



'i 



7. Most verbs may be used impersonally in the Passive Voice, 
This usually hapi)ens in the case of intransitive verbs, which other- 
wise have no passive ; oscurritiir, " they run ;" literally, '* it is run,". 
i.<., "running is taking place." Thus, jAignatur, "they fight," 
(the battle is carried on ;) pugnahatur, " they were fighting ;" pug- 
natum est, " they fought," &c, : vivitur, " people live," (i, «., life ia 
maintained :) ve7Uum est, " they came," &c. 

8. (Stntax) Rule XXIV. — An impersonal verb governs the 
dative: as, Expedit reipublicae, it is profitable for the state. 

9. Exceptions: — 

(1.) B^fert and interest govern the genitive ; as, Refert regia^ 
"it concerns the king;" Interest civium, "it ia the 
interest of the citizens." * 

(2.) Miseret, poenitet, pudet, taedet, and piget govern an 
accusative of the person (who feels pity, regret, shame, 
&c.), and the genitivef of the ohject (which excites the 
feeling) ; as, Pudet mepeccati, " I am ashamed of my 
fault," 

(3.) Decet, delectat, juvat, and opoi'tetX govern the accupative 
of a person with the infinitive ; as, ^'on decet te irasci, 
" it does not become you to be angry." 

10. For further exceptions, and other tninutice, consult an advanced 
grammar, or a dictionary under each verb. 



\ W 



. 



rj, iXERcisE mi. , 

Licet nobis esse beam.' Ifobis gloriari Kcet, nulli gentium mitiorea 
placuisse poenas. Caesariplacuit castra defendere. Caesari placuit, 
ut ad Ariovistum legatos mitteret. Tibi ire licet.^ Tibi ire licuit. 
Quod tibi lubet, idem mihi lubet. Vobis venire licuit. Non cuivis 
contingit adire Corinthum. Legatus petebat, ut sibi discedere 
liceret. 

Omnium interest vera {accus. pi. neiU.) dicere. Mea interest virtu- 

• But when the possessive pronouns accompany these verbs, tliey are used in the 
forma rnei, tud, sua, noitrd, vestra; as, A'on mea r^ert, " it does not concern me." 
Some scholars consider these forms as in the ablative singular feminine, agreeing 
with re; while others regard the phrases as abbreviations for fern meant fert, and 
inter rem est meam. (See Key, Latin Grammar, § 910.) 

t The infinitive mood is occasionally used instead of the genitive; aa, Pudet ni« 
frairem hocfeeisse, " I am ashamed that my brother has done ttiia." 

t Oportet is also followed by the subjunctive, but rarely. . 



f 



FIRST LATIN READER. 



99 



the 



tem colere. Refert civitatis omnes legibus obteniperare. Id nieft 
minime refert. Quid id refert tua ? Quid patris niei interest, ubi tu 
Bis ? Tua et mea maxime interest, te valere. Tua (luod nihil refert 
percontari dcsinas. 

Miseret me tui. Non me poenitet hujus consilii. Inertem poenit- 
ebit aliquando igiia\iae. Pueros ineptiarum poenitebat. Socratera 
non puduit fateri, se multas res nescire. Nos miseret casfts tuL 
Morum civitatis me piget atque taedet. Nunquam Caesarera suscepti 
negotii pertaesum est. Quem poenitet peccasse paene est- innocens. 
An poenitet vos, quod exercitum trans fluraen transduxerim ? Sunt 
homines quos libidinis infamiaeque suae neque taedeat neque 
pudeat. 

Adolescentem verecundum esse decet. Pudet me peccati mei. 
Sunt quos delectet segnem traducere vitam :— et sunt quos studiis 
invigilarejuvet. Pueros diligentes esse oportet. Caesarem oportet 
ad Ariovistum venire. Ariovistus dixit, Caesarem oportere ad se 
venire. Hoc fieri et oportet et opus est. Pecunia his civitatibus 
pro frumsnto dari oportuit. Hoc te oportuit facere. Haec facta 
esee a civibus oportebat. 



EXERCISE XXXII. 



Dii^et acriter pugnatum est. Gloriae maxime invidetur. Nemini 
parcetur. Omnibus constabat hiemari in Gallia oportere. Nuntiatum 
est Caesari Germanos in fuga esse. His rebus fit, ut Helvetii minus 
late vagentur. His rebua fiebat, ut Helvetii minus late vagarentur. 
Vivitur ex rapto. 

Milites vulneribus defessi pedem referre coeperunt. Caesar milites 
hortatur ut veteris gloriae meminerint. Legati dixerunt, se portOs 
msulasque novisse. Multi te oderunt, si te solum amas. Multi te 
odennt, si te solum ames. German! superbiam atque saevitiam 
Lucu Varii odiase coeperant. TuUus HostUius, ut ait Livius, ferocior 
etiam Romulo fuit. Novimus Aristidis justitiam, novimus Socrat's 
eapientiam. Socrates interrogatus quinam homines tranquilliter 
viverent: qui, inquit, nullius turpitudinis sibi conscii sunt. Pater 
tuus, inquit, maledixit mihi. Vos quoque, ait, cives! sustinete 
hoc Tunc contra deus ;— quia noluistis, inquit, vestrum bonum ferre, 
malum pe r-ferte. Equidem, inquit alter, me contomptum esse gaudeo. 
Nunc, mquit, sol unus omnes exurit lacus. Quid refert mea cui 
ser/iam, dum clitellas portem meas ? 



^mmmimmmmi 



100 



FIRST LATIN READKB. 



SECTION XXI. 

INDECLINABLE PARTS OP SPEECH. 
I. ADVERBS. 

1. Adverbs are Tvords joined to verbs, adjectives, or adverbs, to 
modify their signification. Adverbs are either (1) simple; as «a<rptf, 
"often ;" post, "after :" or (2) derived ixom adjectives ; as docte, from 
doci-us, -a, -um ; merito, from merit-us, -a, -wm ; facile , ixomfacil-4s, 
-i3,-e; fortiter. hom fort-is, -is, -e: or (3) certain forms which were 
originally cases of nouns ; as, noctu (by night), joar^m, ibi, ubi, &c. 

2. Many adverbs, especially those derived from adjectives, are sub- 
ject to comparison. The comparative of the adverb is generally 
the nominative singular neuter of the adjectival comparative ; thus, 
doctior, doctior, doctiiis, — this neuter, doctius, being used as the com- 
parative of the adverb docte. From the superlative, doctissimus, is 
formed the adverb doctissimi. 

ADVERBS. 



ADJECTIVES. 






! 




P08ITIVK. 


COMPABATIVB. 


SCPBRLATIVK. 


Doctui, 


Socte, 


Doctius, 


Doctissime, 


learned. 


learnedly. 


more learnedly 


. most learnedly 


Felix, forttmate. 


FSUclter. 


FglToius. 


Felicissime. 


Tortis, brave. 


Fortiter. 


Fortius. 


Fortissime. 


Gravis, heavy. 


GravJter. 


Gravius. 


GravisBime. 


Similis, like. 


Similiter. 


S:miliu8. 


Simillime. 


Liber, free. 


Libere. 


Liberiua. 


Liberrime. 


Ptdcher, beaiUifid. 


Pulchre. 


PulchriuB. 


Fulcherrime. 


Aeger, sick. 


Aegre. 


Aegrius. 


Aegerrime. 


Andax, bold. 


Audacter. 


AudaciuB. 


^ AudacisBime 


Amans, loving. 


Amanter. 


Amantius. 


AmantisBime. 


Fmdens, wise. 


Frudenter. 


FrudentiuB. 


FrudentisBime. 



3. In comparison, adverbs follow the irregularities of the adjeo 
tives from which they are derived ; as,— 

BSnuB, good. BSnS, well. 

M&luB, bad. H&lS. 

MultUB, much, many. Multum. 

Magnus, great. Magnum. 

(FropinquuB, near.) Fr5pe. 

(Pro or prae, before.) 

Valldttfl, strong. Valde. 



Melius, bettf^. 


Optlme, best. 


Pejus. 


FesBime. 


Fias. 


Flurimum. 


MagiB. 


Maxima. 


FropiuB. 


Froxime, [mo. 


FriuB. 


Frimum, or pri* 


Yalidius. 


Validissime. 



PIIWT LATIN READER. 



10] 






4. Only a few of the primitive a<lverbs suffer comparison :— 

Diatius. DifltiBiimJ. 

Saepius. Saepitiimi. 

SSoius. 

Tempgrius. 



Dia, long 

SaepS, often. 

8Scui, otherwise, 

Tempgrl, in time. 

NQper, lateli/. 

S&tia, enough, or sufficient 



S&tias. 



Naperrimfl. 



II. PREPOSITIONS. 

5. Some Prepositions govern the accusative, some the ablative 
and a few either the accusative or ablative :— ' 



(1.) The accusative : — 

Ad, to, up to, near, or nearly. 
Adversus or adversum, opposite, 
Antg, before. [against. 

Apud, near, with. 
Circa or circum, around, about. 
Circlter, about (in regard to time or 

number). 
Cis or citra, on this side of. 
Contra, against. 
£rga, towards. 

Extra, without (opposite of within). 
Infra, below, beneath. 
Inter, between, among. 
Intra, within. 

(2.) The ablative :— 

A, ab, or abs, from. 
AbsquS, without (wanting). 
Coram, in the presence of. 
Cum, with. 

De, dovmfrom, concerning. 
E or ox, out of, of. 



\ Juxta, near to, or beside. 
Ob, against, or on accourU of. 
PSnSs, in the power of. 
Per, through. 
P6ng, behind. 
Post, after. 

Praetor, besides, excepting. 
Propter, on account of, close by. 
Secundum, next after, in accord- 
ance with. 
Supra, above. 

Trans, on the other side of, beyond. 
Ultra, beyond. 
Versus, towards (a place). 



Prae, before, in consequence of. 
Pro, before, instead of. 
Pilam, with the knowledge of. 
Sine, without (i.e., not with.) 
T8nus, v/p to, as far as. 



(3.) The accusative or ablative : the accusative, when motion to- 
wards is signified; the ablative, when rest, or position in, is 
uieant:— 



102 



FIRST LATIN IlKADBR. 



In. 

Sub, 

Siiper, 

Subter, 



With the AccuHtlve. 
into, against, 
under, about, towarda. 
above, over. 



With the Ablatlre. 
in. 

under, 
upon, eonceming. 



under, beneath ; (generally with the accusative in either 
t«m», rarely with the ablative. 



III. INTERJECTIONS. 

6. Interjections are words used to express some emotion of the 
mind, such as joy, grief, astonislunent, contempt, &c. ; as, eheu, 
alas! tugty bravo! ecce, lo! heiia, holla! Interjections are <Arotm 
in between the parts of a sentence without influencing the syntax. 
Some of them, however, when used in connection with a noun, prefer 
a special case ; tlms, 0, heu, proh, take a vocative of address, but an 
accusative of exclamation ; as, formose picer, beautiful boy ! 
lieu me in/elicem, ah ! luckless me ! Jleits tu, holla, you there I 
Vae, woe, prefers the dative (rarely the accusative) ; as, Vae mild, 
woe's me ! Jlei mihi, ah mo ! 

7. Other parts of speech are frequently used as interjections ; as, 
pa.r, peace ! hush ! — infandum, monstrous ! shame ! — miserum, 
wretched! — cito, quick l—Mehercule, by Hercules! 



IV. CONJUNCTIONS. 

8. Conjunctions serve to connect words, clauses, or sentences. 
Some of them are (1) simple; as, et, ac, sed, aut, &c. : or (2) com' 
pound; as, atque, itaqv^, quamvis, &c. 

9. Those conjunctions which are employed to .connect clauses 
that are on an equality with one another— that is, either prvniary 
(independent) clauses or secondary (dependent) clauses, which st^nd 
in the same relation to the governing clause— are called co-ordinative; 
as, ei, ac, -que (which last never stands alone, but is always attached 
to a word), atque, sed, vel, aut, &c. : and those which connect a 
secondary (dependent) clause to a primary or leading clause, are 
called svJ>ordi7iative ; as, ut, si, quum, ne, quo, ubi, dum,* &c. 



* Some of tlieae so-called conjunctions are, more strictly speaking, adverbs, but 
to dvuid confusion the usual classification haa beun retained. 












THE DECLENSIONS, &c. WITH THE CASES IN 
AN ALTERED ORDER. 



FIRST DECLENSION. 



Num 

Voc, 

Ace. 

Oett. 

hut. 

All. 



HINOUX.AR. 
Meni-&, a table. 
Ment-i, table I 
Mens-am, a tabic. [table. 
Mena-ae, a tabk'a, or 0/ a 
Menace, to or for a table. 
Mens-a, from, with, in, or 
by a tablt. 



Mens-ae, tables. 
Mens-ae, tables t 
Men8-a«, tables. 

Meua-&rum, tallies', or of tables. 
Mena-Ia, to oc for tables. 
Hens-Is, from, with, in, or bjf 
tables. 



SECOND DECLENSION. 
SiNOOLAR. Plural. 



Nom. 8erv-as, masc, o slave. 
Voc. Serv-2, slave t 
A cc. 8erv-um, a slave. 
Gen. Ber-v-l, of a slave. 
Dat. Serv-o, to or for a slave. 
AM. Berv-b, from, <bc., a slave 

If. V. it Ace. M&l-um, neut., an apple. 
Oen. Mal-i, of an apple, 
Dai. tfc AU, Mal-o, to an apple, 



8erv-I, slaves. 
8erv-i, slaves I 
8erv-&8, slaves. 
8erv-drum, of slaves. 
8erv-lB, to or for slaves. 
8erv-lB, /row, d'c, slaves 

Mal-&, apples, 
Mal-orum, of apples. 
Mal-is, to apples. 



V 


THIRD DECLENSION. 




SiNOUIiAB. 




Plural. 


N. A Voc. 


H5nor,raasc,, 


honour. 


HonSr-es, honours. 


Ace, 


Hon5r-em. 




Honor-es. 


Gen, 


Honor-Is. 




Honor-am. 


Dat, 


Fonor-I. 




Honor-Ibus. 


Abl, 


Honor-S. 




Honor-IbuB. 


N. d: Voc, 


Frater, m., a 


brother. 


Fratr-es, brothers. 


Ace, 


Fratr-em. 




Fratr-es. 


Oen. 


Fratr-is. 




Fratr-um. 


Dat. 


Fratr-i. 




Fratr-ibns. 


Abl. 


Fratr-e. 




Fratr-iboa. 



u^-'f 



104 



FIRST LATIN RKAnKR. 



SlNQOLAR. 


Plural. 


y. V. liAcc. Animal, n. , on animal. 


Animal-ia, animala. 


Oen. Anim&I-is. 


Auimal-ium. 


Dat. ,t'Abl. Animal-i. 


Animal-ibus. 


»V. «t Voc. Urb-s, f., a citi/. 


TJrb-es, citiet. 


Ace. Urb-em. 


Urb-ea. 


Oen. Urb is. 


Urb-Ium. 


DiU. Urb-i. 


Urb-ibus. 


AH. Urb-e. 


Urb-ibus. 


iV. V. ft Ace. Aet-S, n,, n net. 


Ret-Ia, net$. 


Oen. Ret-is. 


Ret-iunt. 


Dat. d^Abl. Ret-i. 


Rot-ibns. 


*V. «fc Voc. MIlos, m., a addier. 


Millt-es, soldiers 


Ace. Millt-em. 


Milit-es. 


Oen. Milit-is. 


Milit-uin. 


Dat. MiliM. 


Milit-ibus. 


Abl. MUit-e. 


Milit-ibuB. 



FOURTH DECLENSION. 
Singular. Plural. 



N.A 



Voe. Fruct-iis, lu., /»•({{■<. 
Ace. Fruct-um. 
Om. Fruct-fls. 
J)at. Fruct-ui. 
Al>f. Fruct-u. 

A' V. A Aec. 06n-u, n., a knee. 

Oep, Geu-fls. 
Dat. tt- Abl. Genu. 



Fruct-iis, fruits 

Fruct-ua. 

Fruct-iiuin. 

Fruct-Ibus. 

Fruct-ibus. 

Gen-ua, kncca. 

Gen-uam. 

Gen-ibus. 



FIFTH DECLENSION. 



Ace. 
Gen. 
Dat. 
AU. 



SlNGULAn. 

Dl-es, m. or f., a day. 

D*-em. 

Dl-ci 

Di-ei. 

Dl-e. 



i^. A Voc. R-es, f., a thing. 

Ace. R-em. 

Gtn. il-gi. 

Lai. E-ei. 

Ai4. R-9. 



Plural. 
DK-es, ra,, days. 
Di-es. 
Di-evum. 
Di-ebus. 
Di-§bus. 

R-es, things. 

R-es. 

R-erum. 

R-6bU3. 

A-ebus. 



I 



~ / , 



FIRST LATIN READKi:. 



10/i 



\ 









Voc. 
Aec. 
Gen. 
Dot. 

AU. 

N. A Voc. 

Ace. 

Oen. 

Dat. it- Abl. 



Mamx 
B5n-us, good. 
Bon-e. 
Bon-um. 
Bon-i. 
Bon-o. 
Bon-o. 

ilon-i. 
Bon-OS. 
Bon-orum. 
Bon-is. 



N. d: Voc. 

Ace. 

Oen. 

Dat. id All. 

y. V. A Ace. 

Gen. 

Dat. .fc Abl. 

y. <fc Voc. 
Ace. 
Oen. 
Dat. 
AU. 

N. V. A Aec. 

Oen. 

Dat. d Abl. 



Or&v-is, Iicavy. 
6rav-em. 
Grav-is. 
Grav-i. 

Or&v-es. 

Grav-ium. 

Grav-ibus. 

Qrlvior, heaver. 

Gravior-em. 

Gravior-is. 

Gravior-i. 

Gravior-ew-i. 

Gravidr-es. 

Gravior-um. 

Gravior-ibus. 



ADJECTIVES. 

SiNOUIiAR. 
Kom. 
Bdn-a. 
Bon-a. 
Bon-am. 
Bon-ae. 
Bon-ae. 
Bon-a. 

'.'lural. 
Bon-ae. 
Bon-as. 
Bon-arum. 
Bon-is. 
Singular. 
Grav-is. 
6rav-em. 
Grav-is. 
Grav-i. 

PtURAL. 

Grav-€s. 

Grav-ium. 

Grav-ibus. 
Singular. 

Gravior. 

Gravior-em. 

Gravior-is. 

Gravior-i. 

Gravior-e or -i. 
Plural. 

6ravior-os. 

Gravior-um. 

Gravior-ibus. 



1 Pera 
^^om,. tgo, /. 

Voc. . 

Aec. Me, me. 
'Jen. M8i, of me. 
Vat. Mlhi, to or for me. 
[or Mi iiie. 
AU. Me, with, by, from. 



PERSONAL PRONOUNS. 
Singular. 
2 Pers. 
Ta, thou. 

T% thou. 
TS, thee. 
TU, of thee. 
TIbi, to ot for Vice. 



N9Ut 

B5n-ttm. 

Bon-um. 

Bon urn. 

Bon-i. 

Bon-o. 

Bon-o. 

Bon-a 
Bon-a. 
Bon-orum. 
Bon-is. 

Grav-e. 
Grav-e. 
Grav-is. 
Grav-i. 

Grav-Ia. 

Grav-ium. 

Grav-ibus. 

Gravius. 
Gravlus. 
Gravior-is. 
Gravior-i. 
Gravior-e or -I 

Gravi5r-a. 

Gravior-um. 

Gravior-ibus. 



SPera. 



[itself 



TS, with, d'c, tliee. 



Se, himself, herself, 
Bfii, of himj<e/f, d-c. 
Sibi, to or for himaelf, 

dc. 
SS, with himself, dx. 



106 



FIRST LATIN RBADEB. 







Flurai 


i. 






Norn. Nos, W( 
Voc. 


a 


V58, ye or 
Vos, ye or 


you. 
you. 






>• 










Ace. N58, TM 


■ 


Vos, you. 




Se, themselves. 


Gen. Nostri, 


or nostrum, Vestri, or veslrum, 


Sui, of th-emstlvcs. 


of VIS. 




of you. 






[selves. 


Dat. Nobis, 


to or for tLS. VSbis , to or for you. 


SIbi, to or for them- 


AU. Ndbis, 


with, from, Vobis, mth, from, 


8e, with, 


from, die, 


dx., lis. 


die., you. 




themselves. 




ADJECTIVE PRONOUNS. 






Singular. 






Plural. 




Masc. 


Fem. 


Neut. 


Masc 


Fem. 


Neat 


Nom. Hie. 


Haec. 


Hoc, this. 


Hi. 


Hae. 


Haec. 


Voc. 












Ace. Hunc. 


Hanc. 


Hoc. 


Hos. 


Has. 


Haec. 


Gen. Hujus 


Hujus. 


Hujus. 


Horum. 


Harum. 


Horum. 


Dat. Huic. 


Huic. 


Huic. 


His. 


His. 


His. 


Abl. H5c. 


Hac. 

Singular. 


Hoc. 


Hid. 


Hit. 

Plural. 


His. 


Maso. 


Fem. 


Neut 


Masc. 


Fem. 


Neut 


iViwft. Is. 


E&. 


Id, this {here). 


li. 


Eae. 


Ea. 


Voc. 












Ace. Eum. 


Earn. 


Id. 


Eos. 


Eas. 


Ea. 


Cen. Ejus. 


Ejus. 


Ejus. 


Eorum. 


Earum. 


Eorum. 


Dat. Ei. 


Ei. 


Ei. 


lis or eis. 


lis, eis. 


lis, eis. 


^&;. Eo. 


Ea. 


Eo. 


lis or eia. 


lis, eis. 


lit, eis 




Singular 






Plural. 




Masc. 


Fem. 


Neut 


Masc. 


Fem. 


Neut 


Ifom. Qui. 


Quae. 


Qu5d. 


Qui. 


Quae. 


Quae. 


Toe. 








— - 




Ace. Quern. 


Quam. 


Quod. 


Quos. 


Quas. 


Quae. 


Ccn. Cujus. 


Cujus. 


Cujus. 


Quorum. 


Quarum. 


Quorum 


2)a«. Cui. 


Cui. 


Cui. 


Qulbus. 


Quibus. 


Quibus. 


Jbl. Quo. 


Qua. 


Quo. 


Quibus. 


Quibus. 


Quibut. 



hem' 

dlCn 



LISTS OF WORDS USED IN EACH EXERCISE. 



im. 



tn. 
is. 

is 



It 



am 

us. 

us. 



Substantives. 

dncilla,/., a mald-sei-vant 

Ancira, /., an anchor. 

Aqufla,/., an eaRle. 

Aula,/., a hall, court, palace. 

C&sa,/., a hut, cottage. 

Lea, /, a goddess. 

FUia, /., a daughter. 

Funda, /., a sling. 

0€m,f., a cheek. 

Jdnua, /., a door. 

Lingua, /., a tongue, lan- 
guage. 

Luna,/., the moon. 

MuKO, /., a fly. 

Nauta, m., a sailor. 
NympfM,/., a nymph, mai- 
den. 

Pmna, /., a quilL 

Pera, /., a bag, wallet, 

pocket 
Paa/.,tL ball. 
Porta,/., agata 
PHella/., a girL 
Pusma, /., a fight, battle. 
Rigina, /., a queen. 
SUva, /., a wood, forest 
Umbra,/., a shade, slmdow. 



^POi/, ashe-wolt 
Mensa, /., a tabla 
Pluma, /., down, feather. 
POeta, m., a poet 
Vacca,/, a cow. 
^'la,/, away, path, road, 
street 

Adjectives. 



II. 
Substantives, 

AgrkSla, tn., a fanner, hus- 
bandman. 

Ala,/., awing. 

Ara,/., an altar. 

Bdga, tn. or/, a Bel^'lan. 

Cauda, /., a tail 

COma,/., hair. 

DOmina, /., a mistress; 
owner. 

Fomika, /., an ant 

ioursa,/., s bay-tree; lau. 
reL 



.<lnj7!M^i«, o, «m, narrow. 
Apert-ut, a, utn, open. 
Biat-us, a, utn, blessed, 

happy. 
Caec-us, a, urn, blind. 
Clar-us, a, utn, bright, 

clear; famous. 
Ourv-us, a, utn, crooked, 

bent, arched. 
Detis-us, a, urn, dense, 

thick, shaggy. 
Fm-us, a, utn, wearied, 

tired. 
Flav-tu, a, utn, yellow, 

golden, auburn, fair. 
Forfn6s-ui, a, utn, beauti- 
ful (especially tn sfiape). 
Lat-us, a, utn, broad, wida 
Long-US, a, um, long. 
i/e-tM, a, um, my, mina 
Mult-US, a, utn, much, 

many. 
PalUd-iis, a, utn, pale, wan. 
Parv-us, a, utn, small, little. 
Pulcher, pulchra, pulchrutn, 
beautiful (especially In 
/eaturet). 
lidtutid-us, a, um, round. 
Sanct-us, a, utn, holy, reve- 
rend, venerable. 
Sedul-us, a, utn, diligent 
Splendid-US, a, um, magci- 

flcent, splendid. 
7u-ut, a, um, thy, your. 
J-aiiii-iii, 0, iijn, dU'uug, 
powerful 



Verbs. 

Fit, (Sdting.,) (he, she, or 

it) is. 
Sunt, (MpL,) (they) are. 

Prepositions, with 
Ablative. 

Tn, In, among. 
Cum, along with. 



m 

Substantives. 

Ager, agri, tn., a field. 
Atnic-ut, tn., a fliend. 
Arv-um, a, a field (plough 

ed). 
Asin-ua, m., an ass. 
Coll-um, ti., a neck. 
Cycn-us, m , a swan. 
De-tts, m., a god. 
Digit-US, m., a finger, a toe. 
Ddn-utn, a, a gift 
Equ-us, m., a horse. 
FOli-utn, n., a leaf; pi 

foliage. 
Oiner, m., a son-in-law. 
Hort-us, m, a garden. 
Libir-i, -orutn, pi tn., chll. 

dren. 
Magister, magistr-i, tn., a 

master (who teaches.) 
Mal-um, n., an apple. 
Oc&l-tis, m., an eye 
ddi-um, n., hatred. 
6v-um, fi., an egg. 
Pom-um, n., fruit, (usually 

in the pi.) 
Popul-us, /., a poplar-tree. 
Fuer, m., a boy. 
R&tn-us, m., a branch. 
Serv-ua, tn,, a slave, B0^ 

vant 
8dcer, sooer-i, m., a fftthsf- 
in-law. 



I 



108 

TempUum, n., a temple. 
Vir, m., a man. 
rUiO-ui, m., a cal£ 

Adjectives. 

Acat-us, a, um, sharp. 

Alb-tu, a, um, white. 

Alt-US, a, um, high, tall; 
deep. 

Ampl-iu, a, um, Bpacious, 
large. 

Aiper, a, um, rough. 

Car-US, a, um, dear, much- 
loved. 

Fid-US, a, um, faithful. 

Magn-us, a, um, great, 
large; loud, (of sound.) 

ifatOr-ut, a, um, ripe. 

Miser, a, um, wretched. 

VdiOs-us, a, um, hatefuL 

Su-us, a, um, his own, her 
own, its own, their own. 

Tiner, a, um, tender, deli- 
cate, weak. 

Prepositions, with 
Accusative. 
Ad, to, towards. 
In, into ; towards, against 
Inter, among. 

IV. 
Substantives. 

Agger, m a mound, ram- 
part 

Animal, n., a living crea- 
ture, animal 

Anser, m. or /., a gander, 
goose. 

Arator, m., a ploughman. 

Arbor (or arbos), /., a tree. 

Cadaver, n., a corpse, dead 
body. 

Caesar, Caes&r-is, m,, Cae- 
sar. 

Calcar, eakSr-is, tu, a spur. 

Career, eardr-is, m., a pris- 
on. 

Consul, m., a consul. 

Dolor, dolor-is, m., pain; 
grief, sorrow. 

Exul, m. or/., an exile. 

Frdter, fi-atr-is, m., a 
"Drotuer. 

PiUj^isr, n., lightning. 



FIRST LATIN RRADER 

Far, m., a thiet 
Honor, m., honour, reward. 
L&bor, m., labour. 
M&ttr, /, a mother. 
Mercdtor, m., merchant 
AfUlier, /., a woman. 
Pastor, m., a shepherd. 
Pdter, m., a father. 
Sol, m., the sun. 
Sdror, /., a sister 
Timor, m., fear. 
Vir, n., spring. 
Victor, m., victor; victori- 
ous. 
Vomer, m., a ploughshare. 

Agn-us, m., a lamb (male). 
Agn-a, /., a lamb (female). 
Aratr-itm, n., a plough. 
Camp-US, m., a plain. 
Coel-um, n., heaven; the 

sky. 
Corv-us, m., a crow, raven. 
Qlori-a,/., glory; fame. 
LUp-us, m., a w if (male). 
OppM-um, «., a town. 
POpul-us, i, m., a people. 
Radi-us, i. m., a stafF, 



rod; ray, Ac. 
Signum, n., \ 
StStua,/., ) 



statue. 



Adjectives. 

Aequ-us, a, um, level; 
smooth; impartial 

Aetem-us, a, um, eternal, 
never-ending. 

BOn-us, a, um, good. 

Ceier, is, e, swift 

MSi-us, a, um, bad, wicked; 
naughty. 

Roman-US, a, um, Roman. 

Saev-us, a, um, cruel, sav- 
age. 

Tlmld-us, a, um, timid, 
cowardly. 

Prepositions, with 
Accusative. 
Ante, before; in front of. 
Apud^ at; near; at the 

house of. 
Circum, around. 
Inter, betwean; among. 
Per, through i tnrougLcut 
Post, after. 



Prepositions, wi 
Ablative. 
A, db, abs, tiom; away 

from; by. 
De, down from; about; 

concerning. 
E, or ei', out of; fioui 

the midst ofl 
Sine, without 

Conjunction. 

Et, and. 

V. 

Substantives. 

Arx, arc-is, /., a citadel; 

castle. 
Conjux, (,-gis,) m. or /., a 

consort ; husband ; wife. 
Dux, due-is, m. or /., a 

general ; leader, guide. 
Orex, grig-is, m., a flock. 
Qrus (or gruii), m. or /., a 

crane. 
Hiems, /., winter. 
Lex, leg-is,/., a law. 
Mar-e, is, n., the sea. 
MonU-e, is, n., a necklaca 
Pax, pac-is, /., peace. 
Pieb-s, is, /., the commor. 

people. 
Radix, {-ids,) /., a root 
Ret-e, is, n., a net 
Rex, rSg-is, m., a king. 
S&iU-e, is, n., a seat 
Trab-s, is, /., a beam. 
Urb-s, is, /., a city. 
Vox, voc-is, /., a voice. 

Aqu-a,f., water. 
BeU-um, n., war. 
CSron-a, /., a crown. 
Fira, /., a wild beast 
MUr-us, m., a wall 
Taur-us, m., a bull. 
Und-a, /., a wave ; water. 

Adjectives. 

Atrox, savaRO, cruel, fierce. 

Audax, daring, foolhardy. 

Fallax, deceitful, treacher- 
ous. 

Felix, happy ; forttmate. 

Firox, proud ; self-satis- 
fled; flerce. 

Jmt hi, a, um, just, Impar- 
tlaL 






iTRST LATIN EEADER. 



Wl 

; away 

abont ; 

f; from 

m. 



es. 
citadel ; 

or/, a 
id ; wife, 
or /., a 
.guide. 
i flock. 
. or/., a 



r. 

ea. 

jcklace. 

ice. 

commor. 

root 

ting. 
It 

im. 

oice. 



'P. 
ast 



water. 
s. 

el, fierce, 
jlhardy. 
reacher- 

nnate. 
elf-satis- 

L, Impar* 



I 



PUm-ui, a, urn, level; 
smooth. 

Put-ut, a, urn, pure; clear. 

ROr-ut, a, urn, thin; wide- 
meshed. 

StuU-vi, a, WOT, foolish; 
silly. 

Velox, rapid, swift 

Yir-ut, o, urn, true. 



VI. 
Substantiyes. 

Amn-is, m., a river. 

Ap-it (or ape»),f., a bee. 

Aur-i$, /, an ear. 

Av-is,/., a bird. 

Cdn-it, m. or/., a dog. 

Civ-it, m. or/, a citizen. 

CoU-it, TO., a hilL 

Crin-is, tn., hair. 

Etu-is, tn., a sword. 

Fei-es, /, a cat 

Fin-it, m. or /:, an end : in 
pL, territory. 

Host-is, TO. or/, an enemy. 
/Hvin-is, TO., a young man, 

youth. 
Meru-is, tn,, a month. 
Aar-tt,/, aship. 
P&n-is, tn., bread. 
/'mc-m, to., a flsh. 
RUp-es,/., a rock. 
Secur-is,/., an axe, hatchet 
[It takes -im in occjm., 
and -I in abl.] 
Vat-es, is, to., a prophet 

seer. 
Vulp-es,/., a. fox. 



CaUld-iu, a, urn, cunning ; 

sly. 
Dibil-is, is, e, weah 
Dulc-is,is, e, sweet pleasant 
Fort-is, is, e, brave, valiant 
OrOdU-is, is, e, thin, alen- 

der; graceful 
Oratus, a, urn, agreeable; 

pleasing. 
OrSv-U, is, e, heavy. 
Liv-is, is, e, lluht 
Liv-is, is, t, smooth; pol- 
ished. 
Nfger, nigr-a, nigr-utn, 

black. 
Omn-is, «, e, every, all 



109 

Sapio, tn., Sclplo. 
Sermo, tn., speech, coii. 
versatioa 



Verba. 

AmbaUare, tc walk about; 

take a walk. 
Ar-art, to plongli. 
Coen-are, to sup, to dine. 
Festin-are, to hastea 
Nat-are, to swim. 
Pugn-are, to fight 
Salt-are, to leap; dance; 

bound. 
Vdl-dre, to fly. 

VIL 
Snbstantiyes. 



Aper, apri, m., a wild boar. 

Aur-utn, i, n., gold. 

C&peU-a, ae, /., a she-goat 

C'dper, capri, in., a he-goat 

Cdlumb-a, ae, /., a dove. 

/<aK-a,ae,/, Italy, 

Mal-us, i, /., an apple-tree ; 
mast of a ship, masc 

Patri-a, at,/., native coun- 
try, 

T<a>em-a, ae, f., a shop. 

Tontor, tonsoris, m., & 
barber. 

Adjectives. 
Briv-ii, is, e, short 



Ck&o, tn., Cicero, the ora- 
tor. 
ConOkio, (or conditio,) /., a 

condition; state. 
Cor, cord-is, »., the heart 
Mno, /., Juno, queen of 

the gods. 
Lac, latt-is, n., milk. 
Latro, tn., a robber. 
Ligio, /., a legion. 
Leo, tn., a lion. 
Ligo, TO., a hoe ; mattock ; 

spade. 
M&cido, Macid6n-U, tn., a 

Macedonian. 
Oratio, /., speech, (i e., 
power of speech;) .i\ 
oration. 
Pavo, TO., a peacock. 
Poema, poemat-is, n., a 

poem. 
Pntedo, TO.. A Dlrmdersr. 

robber, tineC 
RdUio, /., reason. 



Alexander, Akxandri, to, 

Alexander. 
C(J/ttTO»-a,a€,/, a pillar. 
DUmin-ut, i, to., a master, 

(owner.) 
Fust-U, is, tn., (abL usually 

in i,) a club, cudgel 
Oleb-a, ae,/., aclod; the soil 
Natur-a, ac,/, nature. 
Neptun-m, i, tn., Neptune. 
Niib-es,is,/., a cloud. 
^-», «,/, a sheep. 
Pan, Pan-is, to., Pan, pod 

of shepherds. 
PdcuUutn, «, a, a cup, 

bowl 
Praed-a, ae, /, booty, 

plunder. 
S6ci-iu, t, m., a partner. 

A(^*ective8. 

Foed-us, a, wm, foul, dis- 
graceful 

Maritlm-us, a, utn, belong- 
ing to the sea; mari. 
time, marine. 

NOv-tu, a, utn, recent; 
fi'esh; new. 

Ricens, (gen. reeetU-is,) 
fresh; new. 

Turgid-us, a, tm, swollen ; 
stormy. 

Verbs. 

Aed\fk-Sre, to build. 

Am-are, to love. 

Cert-nre, to strive. 

Cur-dre, to care for ; tend. 

Bdl-are, to belabour. 

Fug-are, to put to flight; 
rout 

Laud-are, to prais& 
A'ic-dre, to slay ; put to a 

violent death. 
.Vac-are, to appease; calm. 

Vers-are, to turn up; till 
Erat (3rf sing.), he (she or 

it) was. 
.Sraw/ (3d;j/.), they were. 



Conjtinotion. 
Atque, and 



110 



u 



VIII. 
Snbblautives. 

Addlescetu, adole»cent-ii, m. 
or /., a young man or 
woman. 

Aetas, aetdC-is, /., an age. 

Bos, bdv-ii, m. or /., an ox 
or cow. 

Civttas, civit/U-ii, /., a state 
or city. 

CAplditas, cupiditdt-U, /., 
desire, passion. 

Custos, cuslod-is, m. or /, 
a guardian ; keeper. 

Dos, dot-is,/., a dowry. 

Fons,font-is, m., a fountain. 

From, front-is, /., the fore- 
head. 

Frms, /fond-is, /., a leaf; 
foliage. 

Olans, gland-is,/., an acorn. 

^^nw, homin-is, m, or /., 
mankind ; a man. 

Idpis, lapid-is, m., a stone. 

laus, laud-is, /., praise. 

Ubertas, Ubert&t-is, /., lib- 
erty. 

Mtru, mmt-is,f., the mind. 

iions, mont-is, m., a moun- 
tain. 

Ifors, tnort-is,f., death. 

N^os, nep6t-is, m., a grand- 
son. 

Pdrens, parent-is, m. or /., 
a parent 

PhfldsSphia, ae, /., wisdom. 

Pietas, pietat-is, /., natural 
aflfection; dutifulness. 

PSs, pSd-is, m., a foot. 

Pons, pont-is, m., a bridge. 

SSlUs, saiat-is, /., safety. 

Sors, sort-is, /., lot; fate. 

VirtOs, virtat-is, /, merit ; 
virtue, bravery. 

Vifluptas, voluptat-is, f.,^ 
pleasure. 



i! ' 



'\ \ 



Av-us, i, m., a grandfatl^r. 

Outt-a, ae, /., a drop. 

japtter, JSv-is, m., Jupiter. 

Passer, passSr-is, m., a 
sparrow. 

Bect-um, i, n., right; up- 
rightness. 

Stts, nt-u, m. or r;, a pig, 
Door. 



FIRST LATIN READEE. 

Turr-it, it, /., a tower; 

castle; palace. 
Ungu-it, is, m., & nail; 

claw, talon. 

Adjectives. 

Aure-u$, a, urn, golden; 

made of gold. 
Consci-us, a, um, conscious 

(oO. 
Fatur-us, a, um, future; 

about to be. 
IlUm&n-us, a, um, human ; 

belonging to man. 
Inyens, ingent-is, great, 

huge, immense. 
Nisci-us, a, um, ignorant of. 
Patai-us, a, um, wide- 
spreading. 
Pauper, (gen. pauper-is,) 

poor. 
Tlnu-is, is, e, fine ; small ; 

narrow. 

Verbs. 

Cdv-are, to hollow (out). 
Z)?tec<-are, to delight; give 

pleasure to. 
L&v-dre, to bathe ; wash. 
LlbSr-are, to free from ; set 

free. 
M\nislr-dre, to supply; 

serva 
Puis- are, to knock at ; 

strike. 

Preposition, with 
Accusative. 

Erga, towardf. 

IX. 

Substantives. 

Cdput, capU-is, n., a head ; 

source. 
Carmen, carmin^is, n., a 

poem; song. 
Ebur, ebOr-ia, n., ivory. 
Flumen, flumln-is, n., a 

river. 
Fulmen, fulmin-is, n., a 

thunderbolt 
Ordmen, gramin-is, n., 

grass. 
A'o-iiKOi, no/iiiii-u, »., a 

name. 



Jfttmen, numfn-tf, n., a 

deity. 
Pecten, peetln-is, m., a comh 



Cerv-us, i, m., a stag. 
Dens, dent- is, m., a tootb. 
Flli-us, i, m., a son. 
Vulcan-US, i, m., Vulcan. 

, Adjectives. 

AntHtju-m, a, um, ancient 
Binirn-us, a, um, kind; 

kind-hearted. 
Ebume-us, a, um, made of 

ivory. 
mad-US, a, um, bright; 

polished; clear. 
Sdpiens, sapient-is, wise. 
Virid-is, is, e, green. 

Verbs. 

D-dre, to give. 
Foed-dre, to defile. 
Monstr-dre, to sboyr; point 

out. 
Mut-dre, to change. 
Pit-are, to think, consider. 
X. 

Substantives. 

CrUs, crur-is, n., the leg. 

Flos, flor-is, m., a flower. 

Jus, Jur-is, n., law; right*, 
equity. 

Mas, mdr-is, m., a male; 
mate. 

Mos, mar-is, m., custom; 
habit 

Mas, mOr-is, m. or /., & 
mouse. 

dt, or-is, n.. the face, coun- 
tenance. 

Eits, rur-is, n., the country. 

Tellus, tellUr-is,/., theeartli. 

Ardne-a, ae,f., a spider; a 

spider's web. 
Oscill-um, i, n., a lip; kiss. 
Rtp-a, ae, /., a bank. 
Scyth-a, ae, m., a Scytuiaa 

XI. 
Substantives. 
Cdpill-us, i, m.,a. hair. 

ConsUciiidO, C'mSiictSd'li-iSj 

/., custom; habit 



! 



FTRST LATIN RRADKR. 



CSpl-M, arum, /., (mili- 
tary) forces. 
Corpus, eorpOr-u, n., n 

body. 
Dicus, dtedr-ii, a, beaaty ; 

ornament 
Equfy, equUis, m., a horse- 
man; knight 
F?-igut, frigOr-ii, n., cold. 
OSnus, gerUfr-itf n., kind, 

rac& 
Ilelthi-i, orum, m., the 

Helvetians. 
JI6mo, homln-it, m. or/., a 
man or woman; man- 
kind. 
Imago, inUlgin-u, /, an 

image; likeness. 
Ir-a, ae,/., anger, wratli. 
Iter, mnlr-is, n., a way, 

route; journey. 
Judex, judlc-ii, m., a judga 
L&tut, kuer-iSy n., a aide, 

flank. 
iTiUs, mittt-is, m., a soldier. 
Munui, muner-is, a, a gift. 
Nimut, nevfidr-ii, «., a 

grove. 
Nix, niv-i3,/., snow. 
Obsgs, obsid-is, m. OT /., a 

hostage. 
dpus, opSr-is, «., a work. 
dti-um, i, n., ease, rest; 

idleness. 
Pamois-us, i, m.. Mount 

Parnassus. 
Phaethon, PhaethotU-is, m., 

Phaethon. 
Pignvj, pignflr-is, n., a 

pledge; token. 
PuJvis, ptUvgr-is, m., dust 
Scilus, scelSr-u, n., wicked- 
ness ; a heinous crime. 
SSnex, sgn-is, (see p. 34,) 
fn. or /„ an old man or 
woman. 
Bd-UB, siiUr-is, n., a con- 

flteUation ; a star. 
Bomn'us, i, m., sleep. 
Tcmpus, iempdr-it, n., time. 
Vec-lex, vertic-is, n., asam- 

mit, top. 
VU, (sfle p. 84), f^ force, 

pover. 
VuirtUi, vuinir-ia, n,, a 
WOOQd. 



Adjectives. 

Candld-us, a, um, white. 

C&n-UM, a, um, srrey, hoary: 
c<»»«i ^ey hairs;. 

Cert-iit, a, um, sure, cer- 
tain. 

Diven-iu, a, um, different, 
diverse. 

yoster, twtlr-a, nostr-um, 
our. 

Hordid-us, a, um, soiled, 
dirty; defiled. 

XII. 
Subsiantives. 
Ae-u>, us, /., a needle. 
Advent-\u, U3,m.,an airlval. 
Arc-US, us, ffj., a bow. 
Cant-US, us, m., a song; 

singing. 
Conipect-us, us, m.. sight, 

view. 
Com-u, us, n., a horn. 
Curr^\ts, us, »»., a cairiage, 

chariot 
Dihn-us, us, /., a house; 

home. 
Equitat-us, us, m., cavalry. 
ExercU-us, us, m., an army. 
Fluct-us, us, ■}»»., a wave, 

billow. 
Fruct-us, us, m., fruit 
Ordd-us, us, m., a step. 
Ldc-us, us, m., a lake. 
Migistr&t-us, us, m., a ma- 
gistrate. 
Jf&nus, us, /., a hand ; a 
band (ie., a handful) of 
men. 
Mr-us, us, /., a daughter- 

In-law. 
Persa, ae, m., a Persian. 
Port-US, us, m., a hafbour. 
Querc-us, us, /., an oak- 
tree. 
Socr-us, us,/., a mother-in 

law. 
Vult-us, its, m., the coun 
iteuance, face. 



Ill 

Tat-us, a, um, safb. 
Vnn-us, a, um, vain, empty 

Verbs. 

Om-dre, to adorn, beautlf/ 
Par-&re, to prepare. 

XIII. 

Substantives 

Aci-es, ei, /., an army ; Jlne 

of battle. 
Caes&ri-es, ei, /, a head of 

hair. 
Di-es, ei, m. or/, a day; 

period: (In pi. masc.) 
Faci-'z, ei, /., an appear- 

ance; faoe. 
F^d-es, ei, /., faith; a pro- 

mise. 
Oiaci-es,ei,/., Ice. 
LuxHri-es, ei,/., luxury. 
MatSri-es, ei, /., material; 

source. 
AfSridi-es, ei, «., mid-day. 
Res, ret,/., a. thing, matter, 

affair, Ac. 
Spes, ei,/., hopai 



Lil-us, oris, n., the shore. 
rerr-a,a«,/, the earth. 

Adjedtives. 

Bamas-us, a, «m,branching; 
abounding to branches, 



Caed-ts, is,/, slaughter. 
Formn-a, ae,/., fortune. 
Gall-US, i, m., a GauL 
JustUi-a, oe,/, justice. 
M&Uum, i, n., an evil; 

wickedness. 
Occas-us, us, m., setting (of 

the sun). 
PecHni-a, ae,/, money. 
ric<ori-a,ae,/, victory. 

Adjectives. 

Dat~us, a, um, given. 

Decor-US, a, um, becoming; 
beautiful. 

PostSr-ut, a, am, the fol- 
lowing; neitx pi. pot. 
tSri, posterity, [savage. 

Torvus, a, um, fierce, 

Van-US, a, um, vaia 

Verbs. 

Serv-are, to keep, preserver 
Vidl-are, to violate; break. 

Prepositions, with 
Accusative, 
CinAter, about (neartyX 
Conira, against; OH)08lteto 



■ lirnj: ' "lit 



112 



FIRST LATIN READER. 




XTV. 
Snbttantives 

Castr-a, orum, n. pi, a 

camp. 
C6pi-a, at, /., plenty : In 

pi., forces. 
Ft«-«m, I, n., wine. 

Adjectives. 

BUxnd-ui, a, um, kind, 
afjrecable. 

Acer, acris, acre, keen ; ac- 
tive. 

Firms, JerentU, carrying; 
bearinfr. 

Fer-us,a, um, fierce, savage. 

FUiel-ii, is, e, faithful 

Verts. 
Pee-ere, to teach, instruct 
Jliib-ere, to have. 
Jmpl-Srt, to fill. 
iMcir-dre, to tear; ftirrow. 
UOn-irt, to wa-n ; advise. 
MSv-ire, to move ; shift. 
R6g-&rt, to ask ; beg. 
nm-ert, to fear ; diead. 
VU-irt, to see. 
* TOc-Sre, to call, aummon. 

Advert. 
Cur, (interrog.,) why? 
XV. 
Substantives. 

Ann-US, i, m., a. year. 

UwUi^ae,arum,f.pl., riches. 

Hast-a, ae,/., a spear. 

Ju^urand-umJurUfurandi, 
n., an oath. 

iforb-us, t, m., a disease. 

Pabm-um, i, n., fodder. 

Prindp&t-us, us, m., sove- 
reignty. 

BfJ!P«6ac-a, reipublisae, /., 
a, republic 

Sdeerdos, sacerdOt-is, m., a 
priest. 

Sipulchr-um. t, n., a tomb. 

Stabul-um, i, n., a stall. 
Adjectives. 

Alter, a, um, one (of two). 

ZHspar, (gen. dispdr-is,) 
unequal 

invei, ((fcn. drSzizi,) i'icu. 

IiUmC'Ui, a, um, hostUa to. 



Neuter, neutrci, neutrum, 

neither (of two). 
Pdr, (gen. pdm,) equal. 
T6l-ut, a, wn, the whole, 

all ; (of time,) livelong. 

Verts. 

InvOc-dre, to invoke; pray 
to. 

OUin-ere, to get , seize ; re- 
tain. 

Stdre, to stand. 

TOu-dre, to thunder 

Torqu-lre, to twist, hurl 

Adverb 

NdiH, not 

XVL 

Substantives. 

Argeni-um, t, n., silver. 

Comeii-a, ae,/., Cornelia. 

Cur-a, ae,/., care, anxiety. 

Jmp&dtor, is, m., a gene- 
ral; commander. 

Nemo, nemin-it, m., no one. 

Nihil, (indeclinable), «., no- 
thing, (used in nom. and 
accus.) 

Nox, noctis, /., night 

dnus, oner-is, n., a load, 
bnrdeii. 

Pldnit-a, ae, m., a pla: ^t 

Rom-a, ae,/., Rome. 

R6mia-us, t, m., Romulus. 

Siqudn-i, orum, m, pL, the 
Sequanl 

Tullus Hostilius, m., TuUus 
Hostilius. 

Vent-us, t, m., the wind. 

Adjectives. 

i4e5'«a^w,«,e,equal; coeval 

CeUber, Celebris, celebre, 
much-frequented; cele- 
brated. 

DiffMl-is, is, e, difficult 

Doct-us, a, um, learned. 

Egens, ^gent-is, needy, poor. 

Eldquens, eloquent-is, elo- 
quent 

3xtrim-us, a, um, last; 
most remote. 

FScU-is, is, e, easy 

Hvfitzi-us, «, Uih, Honour- 
able; honest 



Major, mqfor, mqfvs, 
greater. 

miUdris, is, e, military. 

Minor, minor, minus, less. 

Niquam, (indecl.,) less; 
good-for-nothhig,woi-th» 
less; nauphty. 

Odor, isior, dcius, swifter. 

Praestans, praestantis, ex- 
cellent 

Sdgax, (gen. tagdc-is,) sa- 
gacious; wise. 

Slmtl-is, is, e, like. 

Su7nm-us, a, um, the high- 
est 

VU-is, is, e, cheap ; wortb- 
less. 

Verts. 
Oppugn-dre, to besiege, at- 
tack. 
Port-dre, to carry. 

Prepositions, with 
Accusative. 
/ttx^a, beside; nearta 
Prdpe, near ta 
secundum, along by; ueai 
to. 

Adverb. 

Quam, than. 
Prope, near. 

XVII. 

Substantives. 

Caus-a, ae, /., a cause; 
reason. 

Coen-a, ae,/., dinner; sup- 
per, 

C^dp-a, ae,/., a fault 

Liber, libr-i, m., a book. 

Sanguis, sanguin-is, m., 
blood. 

Adjectives. 

Add-us, a, um, bitter; sour. 

Avdr-us, a, um, covetous; 
greedy. 

Industri-us, a, um, dill- 
gent; industrious. 

Iners, (gen. inert-is,) de- 
void of energy , idle. 

Laet-us, a, um, joyful 

Trist-is, is, e, sad, sorrowful 

Util-is, is, e, uMluL 



VkantrAtut, a, vm, wound 
ed 

Verb. 

Sum, I am. 

Cozgonotion. 

Sed, but 

XVIII. 

Sabstantives. 

Astr-um, i n., a star. 
Duetpiil-tu, i,m., a. pnpil 

scholar. 
FOr.um, i, n., a forum, or 

market-place. 
FrUmtnt-um, i, n., com. 
IiarrJr.us, i, m., the upper 

arm ; the shoulder, 
/(/n-it, is, TO., Are, 
Insidt^, arum, /., snares; 
treachery j an ambush. 
/«*«-a,a«,/, anlsland. 
lacrim-a, ae, /., a tear, 
I^vt, kpOr-it, TO., a hare 

i/efla«-n.a,o«,/, medicine: 
a drug, 

Nereis, merad-i», /, pay, 

wages; reward. 

A^ttn«-ttf,;TO.,ames8enger. 
Sccd^ ae, /, a ladder; 

generally used In the 

pl., tcalae. 
THiuit-at, atis,/., slender- 

ness. 



"R8T LATIN READER. 



I Jfaviff.dre, to salt 
OccHp-an, to take posses- 
sion o£ 
I Hecut-are, to refusa 

Fr<«J^A--<ir«. to blame; find 
fault with 



lis 



Adverbs 

FSctte, easily. 

^f< not, (used wiih im- 
peratives, and subjunc- 
tives when employed as 
Imperatives.) 
^Uper, lately. 
Quit, how many ? 
Qudtidie, dally. 
Saept, oftea 

Conjunctions. 

Quo, that ; in order that 
Si, if. 

Prepoiition, with Ac- 
cusative or Ablative. 
Super, abova 

XIX. 
Substantives. 



Pronouns. 

^m, (i.&, cum *«,) with 
himself herself, itself, 
or themselves. 

Vobiscum, with you. 

Adjectives, 
^r-wj, a, urn, hard. 
^^A-w, a, um, middle. 
^«n»-t«, a, um, excessive; 

too much. 
A'firf-t« a, m, naked; 

lightly clad. 

Verbs. 

Eqiat-are, to ride. 
Impitr^re, to obtain; re- 
ceive. 

Jndk-are, to declare. 
- - - — «, .^ ^jj^j.^^ 
^-dr<, to swim. I 

(122) 



AuH-us, i, TO., an ass. 
Avimcul-us, i, TO., an uncle. 
-«M<i-a, a«, /, a beast 
Britann-i, orum, to., the 

Britons. 
COs-w, us, TO., a misfor- 
tune; calamity. 
Ccusi-ui, i, TO., Casslns. 
Oib-us, i, TO., food. 
Comfs, comit-it, m. or /, 
a companion, associate. ' 
OuH-a, ae,/., senate-house. 
DivUiac-us,i, to., Divitiacus. 
Ferr-um, t, n.. Iron; the 

sword. 
Figur-a, ae, f., figure;! 
shape. I 

Omdi-ut, i, m., a sword, 
ChOcHl-us, i, to., a jack- 
daw. 
Hibem-a, orum, n. pi.^ 

winter quarters. 
Jlorde-um, i, n., barley. 
Horre-um, i, n., a barn. 
IncdUa, ae, m. or/, an In- 
habitant. 

Z^a<-tM,t, TO., a lieutenant- 
generaL 

8 



limut, ^ m., mud, slime. 
Lprnpfi-a, ae, /, cleai 

water. 
Mandat-um, i, ».,-. com- 

mand; commission. 
Afercun-us, i, to.. Mercury 
^fft-us, lb,, TO., fear. 
^otut, us, TO., a move. 

Dient 

iffi/a, a«,/,a8he.mul«, 
^ex, nic-u,/., death. 
OpA--a, ae,/., work, serrlce 
^or*,par<.«,/,apart 
Peccat-um, <; n., a sin: 

fault 
Per/Og.a, ae, to., a deserter. 
Pericul-um, i, n., danger. 
FMipp-i, orum, m., Phi". 
Jppl. 

Foen.a,ae,/., punishment 

Praeh-um, i, n., a battla 

Jian-a, ae, /, a frog. 

Rostr-um, i, «., a beak. 

^cus, i,m.,A bag, sack. 

S*mt~us,i,m.,ortmi.a,at 
/. an ape. 

SimiOacr-um, i, «., an 

'mage ; likeness. 
Sdcrat-es, is, to., Socrates. * 
-»*»-««, ^ TO., a sound; 

nois& 

Spiaa-um, i, n., a mirror. 
StibiU-um, i, «., a stall; 

stable. 
TigilUum, i, „., » log of 

wood. 
r^ia, ae, /., pardon, 

leave. 
Verb-um, i n., a word. 
f^«a<or, viotor-u, to., a tra- 
veller. 

Adjectives, 

I Acerb-us, a, um, bitter. 
Csh-us, a, um, high. 

Ce(^-i,ae, a, pl, the rctt 
Cuncl-i, ae, a, pl, all 
Ducent.i,ae,a, two hundred 
Iryust-us, a, um, unjust 
/n«<t/-M, M, e, uselesa 
l-avid-us, a, um, fearful- 

timid. 
Pius,pMris, more. (See 



p. o(.; 

I /'♦•-i«.t«, a, um, wicked. 
■«-«», a, um, first 



114 



FIRST LATIN RKADER. 



t- I 



U: 



Qf4Al-U, i$, e, of what kind. 

Qulilam, quaedam, quod- 
dam, a certain one. 

Qttingenti, at, a, five hun- 
dred. 

Spdtial-u*, a, urn, plun- 
dered; despoiled. 

fluperb-ui, a, vm, proud; 
ImuKhty. 

SupAHor, tuperior-is, InxU- 
er, (eompar.) 

8upA'-vi, a, Mwi, hlffh. 

Unk-us, a, urn, only, solo. 

Vaeu-ut, a, um, empty. 

Verbi. 

AdOr^Hr«, to worship. 
Atpecl-Urt, to look at ; rn- 

gard. 
ConvOe-Sre, to summop. 
Contin-lre, to hold In; 

bound. 
Evdc-are, to call forth. 
Foe-ire, to do; make. 

(Foe ut; Bee that) 
F;-?r«, to weep 5 lament 
Fugit-Urt, to flee away. 
Otr-ire, to carry on. 
Ilahit-are, to dwell In. 
JmmitC'ire, to mix with; 

associate. 
Interrog-dre, to ask about 
Jac'tre, to He. 
Jub-lre, to order. 
Miie-frt, to mix. 
J\rd;T>»rt-are, to nama 
Par-Ire, to obey, {govtrns 

dative.) 
/'ermtfc-i're, to excite alarm. 
Iie»pond-lre, to answer. 
R^SC'&re, to call back. 
Rid-^rt, to laugh ; laugh at. 
Savci-dre, to wound. 
Sfd-fre, to sit 
7V»-?re, to hold. 
7(frr-?re,to fiighten.terri fy. 
Tvn-&e, to lift up, raise; 

take away. 
Titm-lre, to swelL 
Turft-fire, to confuse. 
Vit-Hre, to avoid, 
rii/ner-flre, to wound. 

Adverbs. 
Viu for a long time. 



Fnutrm, In rain ; UMleMly. 

Furtim, secretly . 

Nonnt, (inttrrog., expect- 
ing the answer, " Yej,") 
Is It not ? 

Pridie, the day befora 

Propiut, nearer. 

Kecte, rightly. 

Hie, thus. 

Preposition, witb 
Accusative. 

Apud,at; near; among. 

CoDJanctions. 

Quia, becausa 

Qiium, when, since, be- 

cause. 
Ut, that 

XX. 
Same as before. 

XXL 

Same as before. ' 

XXIL 
Substantives. 
Acdpiter, aecipitrxi, m., a 
hawk. 

Atdu-i, orum, in. pi, the 
Aedui. 

Amor, M, m., lovo. 

Antoni-'M, i, rrt., Antony. 

AuxUi-um, I, n., help. 

Ariovitt-us, i, m., Ario- 
vlstus. 

BarMr-tu, i, m., a bar- 
barian. 

BrSehi-um, i, n., an arm. 

Ciiro, earn ii, /., flesh. 

Catilin-a, ae, m., Catillno. 

Clamor, is, m., a sliout. 

EpiitOl-a, ae, /., a letter, 
epistla 

E.Tit-us u», m., an outlet 

Flet-us, us, m., weeping; 
lamentation. 

Oermdn-i, orum, m., the 
Germans. 

Orati-ae, arum, f. pi 
thanks; gratitude. 

Graiia* habere, to feel gra- 
titude. 

Stidf.ut^ i, 771., a water- 
serpent 



fmpft-iu, tw, m., an attack 

.f/tn-us, i, m., Janus. 

Labien-tu. i, m., Lat)lonu\ 

Afultituilo, miiUituUln-ii, /, 
a inultituda 

Mundus, i, m., the world. 

Num-a, re, in., Numa. 

Octavi-a, ae, /., Octavia. 

Octatian-ui, i, m., Octavl- 
anu& 

Ovll-e, it, n., a sheep-fold. 

Praetori-um, i, n., the gen- 
eral's tent 

Pritieept, princfp-is, m., ft 
chief man. [dence. 

Prdvidmti-a, ae, f., pravl- 

RMnm, i, tn., the Rhine. . 

Riv-us, I, ,n., a river. 

Salt-US, IIS, m., a forest. 

Societas, sdcietdt-is,/., an al- 

Uxor, IS,/., a wife. [Uance. 

VagU-us, us, m., the cry of 
infants. 

ririlas, veriiat-is,/., truth. 

Adjectives. 

Divin-iu, a, um, divina 
Not -us, a, um, well known 
Sfcund-us, a, um, second; 

favourable. 
Turbuknt-^u»,a, wn, muddy 
Vast-US, a, um, huge, vatit 

Verbs. 

Ag-Sre, to do ; to treat of. 
Rlb-Sre, to drink. 
Cap-ire, to take. 
Claud-fre, to shut 
Cog&e, to collect 
Conflig-fre, to engage (ta 

I battle). 

Conven-ire, (4th Conj.,) to 
come together; to suit 
Curr-ire, to run. 
Dlpric-oi; atus, art (fiVam), 
to beg (the life of). 

Dic-fre, to say ; speak. 

Ditbit-are, to doubt 
Duc-^e, to lend; command; 
</. uxorem, to marry. 

Sii-lre, to give forth; utter 

E(hic-(re, to lead forth. 

Fae-Sre, to do ; make. 

Fug-ire, to flee. 

Gratul-ari, to congratulate 
i J/ttl-A-e^ to send. 



Kab-frr, to marry, (gnverrn 

dative.) 
I'and-irt, to rtretch out, 

extend. 
Pit-trt, to beg; aik; aue 

for. 
Pr*if(c-frt, to proitrat*. 
Po»tui-6rt, to (leiimnd. 

^P-A-e, to carry off; selie. 
fii'g-fre, to rule, Kovern. 
Jielinqu-er$, to leave; ubii 

don. 
RepeU-trt, to repel, drive 

buck. 
ficrib~ere, to writa 
Spectare, to examine, look 

at 
Statute, to determine. 
JWfrM-*-*, togive; assign, 
Vdl-ire, to be strong ; to be 

healthy. 
r<S»-{re, to come. 
Vinc-ert, to conquer. 
Vw-irt, to live. 

Adverbs. 
Sb, twice. 
Citfriier, quickly. 
Plui, more, 

Qttondaw, once (on a time). 
TVin/um, only. 

Preposition, with 
Accusative. 
Trat)s, beyond. 



PrUflT LATIN IIRADKR. 



116 



sum- 



XXIII, 

Same as before, 

XXIV. 

Substantives. 

Aeitas, aettat-is, /, 

men 

Antr-utn i n ^ 

""*' »i «•, a cave, 

grotto. 
^''''"•' «««^-M, »*., heat 

castle. 

ContM-a, ae, /, an in- 
sult 

^o'^nth.v3,i,/., Corinth. 
™-'". «. w- Cras.su9. 
Cmm-um, i, „., a bed- 

chamber. 
Dionmi-tit •• ~ t\< - 

^""'-w, «,/. the ground. 






^Vn "m, <, n., a piece of 

wodil ; timber. 
/Md-ut, i, ,n., play. , 

school 

A'Mnii-w, <, m., a messen 
ger. 

Tab.a,ae,/., a trumpet 
Turba, of.^ ^_ ^ ^^ 

rabbia 

^ann-w, i, m., a tyrant 

Adjectives, 
^'•-w, a, ud, one 

many); another. 
/'»«-«, iu, a, two at a time, 

(See p, 39.) 
-0" 0, ae, 0, twa (See p 

39.) ^ 

Fulmint-m, a, urn, thun- 
dering. 

^t/em, tdwteOT, frf«m, the 
same. I 

ImprOb-ut, o, urn, wicked. 

i^*rt/,i.w, a, uw, superl. 
of m<vn««, the greatest; 
very great; very serl- 
ous. 

Munit-uM, a, urn, foitifled 

(Pert part of munire.) 
Pavpl-tu, o, ttm, fearful; 

in terror. 
Per/id-US, a, urn, trencher- 

ous, traitorous. 
Piapid-ui, a, ttm, swift, fleet 
^^-U3, a, um, late: sera 
nocte, late at night 



to be obedient; 



Ohfil-lre, 

obey. 
ParturWe, to bring forth. 
-SwiMr*, tofeel; think. 
Serv-tre, to serve; be a 

slave to. 
Ven-ire, to comei 

Adverbs. 

An, (iplfrtoff.,) whtther or 

no? 
Crat, to-morrow. 
II Ai, yester'lay 
yf, Oolned to word^ as 

amat-ne, do you love ?) 

whether or no? 

Preposition, with 
Accusative. 
Supra, above. 

XXV. 

Substantives. 

Alp.es, turn, m., the Alps. 
Angusti-ae, arum,/., straita 
Prdgor, is, m., a crash. 
-fHv-um, i, n., a yoke. 
Juss-vs, us, m., an order. 
Zt«n/rt-a, a*,/, luxury, 
Oppidan-i, orum, m., peo. 

pie of a town, 
Praecept-urtt, i, n., a com- 

mand. 



f^n-us, a, urn, one. 
Vari-ut, a, urn, various. 

Verbs. 

Aper-ire, to open, 
Aud-ire, to hear. 
Cant-are, to sing. 
Cond-h-e, to found. 
Dorm-ire, to sleep. 
/Vr-ire, to strike, 
/'in-fre, to finish. 
Fund-ire, to pour forth; 

gj^'e forth abundantly 
Inquin:are, to defile; be- 

mire. 
Insil-ire, to leap up on. 
Linqu-ire, to leave, 
^nc-Sre, to dart: «hins 

hnghUyon; flash. 
Mun-ire, to forUfy. 



Adjectives. 
Mi, (voc of fB«-iM, a, vm,) 

my, 
PesHm-m, a, urn, the worst 

(See p. 37,) 
PuU-m, a, vm, beaten. 

(Perf part, of pello) 
PueriUis, «,e, boyish; be. 

longing to boys. 

Verbs. 
ErM-ire, toeducate; teach, 

instruct 
Prang-ire, to break. 
Moll-ire, to soften. 
Pell-ire, to drive awny 

banish. 
Perven-tre, to como to 

Prohib-Sre, to prevent. 
Pun-ire, to punlah. 



./- 



i 

I 



li I i 



116 

R4MHnd-frt, to tear down. 
Bipii-Wt, to bury. 
Tramthte-irt, to lead acroH; 

transfer. 
Vmt-yrt, to clothe. 

Adverbi. 

IXttgmter, dlllKentljr. 
Ji^tutt, unjustly. 
Jam, now, already. 
Maxime, especially, most 

of all 
MfrUo, deserrodly. 

Preposition 
Sub, under. 

XX VL 

Substantives. 

Att, atr-it, n., brass. 

A»im-m, t, m., the mind. 

Catud, (abL,) for tho sake, 
or purpose, oC 

Commi-ui, i, m., Com- 
nilus. 

Exempl-um, i, n., an ex- 
ample; specimen. 

OaUi-a, ae, /., Gaul. 

HospW-um, iy n., hospi- 
tality. 

MAtfri-a, <w, /., material; 
source. 

Pudor, it, m., shame ; mo- 
desty. 

Adjectives. 

ffie, haee, hoc, this. 
I'aue-i, ae, a, (pi), a few. 
Reliqu-ut, a, urn, remaiu- 
Ing. 

Verbs, 

Amplect-i, to embrace. 

Cdn-dri, to endeavour, 

Deterr-ire, to frighten ; 
prevent; deter. 

FdH-ire, to deceive. 

Fat-lri, to confess. 

Uort-Ari, to exhort; en- 
courage; 

Ldqv-i, to speak. 

Met-iri, to measure. 

MOr-Ori, to delay. 

POt-iri, to get possession 



Cf * T 

at 



mob-o vniraAlf ma£*fur 



FIRST LATIN RKADER. 

ProJkUe-i, to set out, start., 

depart 
R^/k-irt, to reflt. 
Stqthi, to fl)llow. 
Smd-lrt, to advise. 
7V2<-<lri, to defbnd ; protect. 
Uti, to us& 

Adverbs. 

JTo, tothls; thither; there- 
fore. 

Libenter, willingly. 

Supra, (prtp. or wlv.,) 
above. 

Tanquam, (adv. or cwy.,) 
as If ; as it were. 

Conjunction. 
Vtl, either : »«/—««/, either 
—or. 



XXVII. 
Substantives. 

AtMn-ae, arum,/., Athens. 

Chabri-ai, ae, m,, Chabrlas. 

Dumnorix, Dumnorigis, m., 
Dumnorlx. 

Oraec-u$, i, m., a Greek. 

A/el, mell-it, n., honey. 

OrgftOrix, Orgetorig-ii, m., 
Orgetorix. 

Paia*, palUd-ii, /., a lake. 

Perii-a, ae, /., Persia. 

Pratfect-ut, i, m., an over- 
seer; governor; com- 
mander. 

Quaettor, is, m., a quaestor. 

RaurSe-i, orum, m., the 
RauracL 

Skili-a, ae, /., Sicily. 

Statio, stati6n-is, /., a bta- 
tion, post 

Trqj-a, ae, /., Troy. 

Adjectives. 

Adjlict-us, a, um, or afflict- 
ut, a, um, distressed; 
afflicted. 

i <4?,v.tit, a, um, white. 
I .(■>»si, »r.J, triif. three. 
i i.C,'-i a. w,, any. 
f^K ;. ' a, ,», (pert part, of 
vidi^,) seen. 

Verbs. 

Cal-drt. to be warm. 



Cofn»i«<*i«, to engage {eg 
In battle.). 

DtUr-ifn, to desert abaUf 
don. 

A)lffet-*r«, todlvldtt 

Rfi-ire, to eat 

Imptr-Urt, to order, com- 
mand. 

Afaledlc-fre, to speak 111 of, 

Ohiter-ikre, to beseech. 

Pertuad-ire, to persuade. 

Praeb Irt, to afford; sup. 
ply. 

Praecld-fre, to excel; sur- 
pa.u. 

/*»-a«<<p-*r«, to order, en- 
join. 

Qi/A'-<, to complain. 

Revert-i, (also r«ft«T<-*y,) 
to return. 

Sueeurr-ire, to succonr, 
help. 

Vag-ari, to wandei ; roam 
about 

Adverb. 

Nunquam, never. 

Preposition, witb 
Accusative. 

Advtr$u$, against 

Conjunctions. 
NUi, unless. 
Quod, because. 
Uti, that ; in order that 

XXVIII. 
Substantive. 
Or/Uor, is, m., an orator. 

Adjectives. 

Dubi-us, a, um, doubtful. 
Ips-e, a, um, sell 
Perpaue-i, ae, a, (pi), rery 

few. 
Prdb-us. a, um, upright; 

good. 
Punic-us, a, um, Punic, 

Carthaginian. 

Verbs. 
Atting-frt, to reach; attain. 
Ctmsfmi-L to Overtiike, 
Disum, I am wanting ; fail. 



KP^ ^«, fo escape. 
Impend-tre, to li»ngoveri 

Impend. 
fnltrem, to be present at; 

engage in. 
Nig-Ott, to deny; mv 

"Na" 
Poue, to be able. 
froHue, to bo o»er ; com- 

uianl 
t'ludeue, to do good to; 

belp. 
Wrf-*i, (dtp.,) to neem. 

Adverbs. 
Plurimum, rery much. 
/'ottea, afterwards. 
Q«<,how? Inwhatmannei-? 
Quin, how not ; but that. 

CoQjanotion. 

^«c. nor: B«>-fl«c, neither 
—nor. 



I'lRST LATIN READEIl. 



/tuan~ut,a,ut ofaiiiound 

mind; mad. 
iMX-tu, a, urn, loose. 
Quivis, quaevu, quodvit, 

any one, any thing. 
Tantut, a, urn, to great; 

•0 much. 



117 

Vetltr, vtttr-a, vutr-wn, 

your. 
Viviu, o, um, allre, living. 



XXIX. 

Substantivea. 

Arm-a, orvm, n. pi, arms, 

armour. 
Arroganii-a, at, /, arro- 

gance; pride. 
Aul-ui, i, m., Aulus (prop. 

namt). 
Aur-a,ae,/., a breeze. 
fiK-ut, f, wj., a purse; 

money-bag. 
InHri-a, at, /., injustice; 

wrong. 
Jurgi-um, i, n., a quarrel : 

brawL 
^ttl-us, i, m., a (he) mule. 
A^wx, wfio-M,/, anut. 
Suetn-a, a«, /, a burden ; 

pack. 
««-««, w m., & curve; 

bay; fold (0/ a robe). 
Spati-um, t, a, a space, 

distance. 
Stagn-um, i, n., a pool. 
Tdlr-us, i, m., an ankle 
bone J a die, (p/.) dice. 



Verb!. 

AdnOr-Ori, to admire; won- 
der at 

Aiifer-re, to take away. 

^<r-r«,tobcar, carry; bring. 

Impon-ire, to lay on ; im- 
pose. 

/nfer-re, to bring in ; wage. 

Jfunti-are, to tell; report; 
declare. 

Pro/er-re, to put forth. 

Sum-ire, to takft 

Adverbs. 

Impane, with Impunity. 
Tarn, so. 



Adjectives. 

Advers-us, a, urn, opposite; 
*vt adversae, adversity 

tf«fee<».w,a,M»»,iieiTeOftn. 



XXX 

Substantives. 
^mfciV<-o,a«,/,fHendihlr. 
BfntfM-um, i, a, benefit, 

service. 
BOn-um, i, n., a blessing, 

advantaga 
Cate-us, i, m., cheese. 
Cruor, is, tn., blood, gore. 
Ingeni-um,i,n., disposition, 

nature. 
IrOcundi-a, ae, /, anger, 

wratli, 

.tf«M«-a,o«,/, awea.sel. 
Rfpulsa, at, f., tk rebuff, 
repulse. 

Adjectives. 
Fiffn-ut, a, um, strong, 
firm. 

Mdlett-us, a, um, trouble- 
some. 

Preru-us, a, um, cauRht, 
(perf. part of prehendo 
OTprendo.) 

Prdpri-us, a, um, one'sown. 

Ruptus, a, um, burst 

Singul-i, ae, a, one each 

_ (time, 4c.) 

J.mct-ut, a, um, stalaed, 
dyed. i 



Verbf. 

Coep-istt, tn begin. 
Corrip-ire, to seize, 
Orid-ire, to believa 
Cup.fre, to desire. 
Itfvdr-are, to devour, 
Ditcfd.&e, to depart 
EmUt-A-e, to. send forth i 
drop. 

Exut(m-are, to tliink, 
Judga 

fmput-are, to attribute to, 

imputA 
It\fl-art, to blow up, inflat*. 
Inquam, I say. 
Init-are, to stand over, im- 
pend. 
Maer-ire, to grieve. 
Ment-iri, to tell lies. 
A^«/«, to be unwilling. 
NoK-gre, to ki.ow, recog- 

nls& 
N6vme, to know. 
Otlend-gre, to show ; show 

off. 
Parc-fre, to spare, (with 

dot.) 
Pdti, to suffer. 
Per/ir-re, to bear on, con- 

tlnue to suffer. 
Prehend-fre (preiuUfre), to 

catch, seize. 
Purg-are, to clear, free. 
liid-ire, to return. 
Rump-ire, to burst, break. 
Ting-ire, or tinguire, to dip, 

stain, dye. 
Ve/Ze, to wish, will. 



Adverbs. 

Ita, thus. 

Vbi, (adv. or cwy.) when, 

where. 
Vitro, of one's own accord; 

farther; veliemently. 
Undique, from all parts. 
Vaiidius, more vigorously. 

Preposition, with 
Ablative 

Cdram, before ; la presence 
oC 



\ 



118 



FIR8T LATIN UKAPKll. 



') 



Conjuuotion. 
tJum, whilst. 

XXXI. 

Substantives. 

ConMli-utn, i, n., c«)iiiisul, 

mSvlcG. 
OtM, gcnlis, /., ft >ui'«, 

trlbo, nntluii. 
/j/t»iU'i-(i, <i«, /., Inactivity, 

sloth, idluno'tii. 
tti.'fti-a, (ir, /, hIUIiiom: 

j>l. foolorlos, trtrtos. 
If^filini-a, (If, /., evil re- 
port, bud i-hunu'tur. 
UMdo, llbuUn-ia, /., lust, 

(luHiro. 
JNVj/(>H-Mm, », n., Imslncss, 

afTiiir, tiling. 
Opus est, it is iieod^iL (Sou 

VofahuUify.) 
aiilili-unt, i, a, koaI, ilu- 

tirc, study. 

Adjectives. 

Dlliijitis, dili{/cnl-is, tllll- 

Ki'iit, Industrious. 
ttinikvns, inudfeiit-is, harm- 

li'ss, innocent, 
ITtt-ii, M, <, nrjek; mild; 

Kcntle. 
\iill-m, a, iini^ luinc 
Qi(«ri.i, (fiHKVis, qitoitris, or 

iftiidvis, any person or 

thing. 
Se^H-u, M, e, ln.ictlve, 

slow; idle. 
Suscfpt-tu, a, um (perf. 

part. otsttsHpio), under- 
taken; be^uu. 
Viirccutid-ui, <i, uin, modest. 

Verbs. 

Ad ire, to go to, visit, 

Cai-^re, to cultivate ; in- 
habit; worship. 

Contin^it, Itfulls toono'slot. 

Dfcct, it leconies. 

Di^tftidfre, to defend, pro- 
tect 

Ddectat, it delights. 

Dtlect-are, to delight, 

Dain-irt, to give over, 
cease. 

it-eri, tu be uiade ; to be- 
come. 



OhIriAn {dff,), to boast 
Intet-ut, it coiicorns. Is of 

importance. 
Invli/iidrt, to keep watch 

over. 
./tJi'df*, to help, wMUi, 
UM, or tutitt, it pieascs (I 

like). 
l.Urt, it is perm If ted. 
LuM, or /iftj"*, tt plciisi's (1 

like). 
Mh'^rl, it excites pity ; I, 

thou, Ac pity. 
Xetc irr, not to know. 
Olitcmpff-at't^ to obey, 

(with (/(«<.) 
OporM, it behoves (mo, 

tlu'u, &c), I nuLst. 
recc-ilff, to sin. 
rtfcotUUri, ('/<•/>.,) to Iji- 

(]uire; search into. 
I'ertd^lltn tst, it disi;ust8, 

I am disKustcd, Ac 
I'h/et, it Kriuves. 
I 'Meet, it pleasos. 
Poenitet, it repents, 
/'M(/ct, it nshamea. 
lir/et't. It concerns. 
I'lU'det, it disgusts, wearies, 

.te. 
Tradilf-fre, or trini^^ditc-ere, 

to bring across, trans- 
port 

Adverbs. 

Aliqiiando, soinetiiues. 
M}iiUne, least of all ; by iiu 

mean.s. 
J'aetie, almost 

Preposition, with 
Ablative. 
Pro, before, iu front of; 
instead of. 

Conjunction. 

Sique, neitlier, nor. 
XXXII. 

Substantives. 

An'stid-es, is, m., Aristides. 
CiiMl-ac, itrum, /. pi, n 

pack-saddle, pannier. 
Uvi-us, i, tu., Livy. 
Liici-us, I, Hi., Lucius. 
Saevitia, at. /., cruelty. 
SapittUi-a, ae,/., wiMi^.m. 



Supfrhi-n, at, /, pvlilc; 

haughtiness; tyranny. 
TurpUudo, lutpilititin-i>, /., 

Ixuieness. 
I'li/'i-iM, », m. (prop, nmne), 

\'ariu«, 
Vuln-ui, erii, «., a wound. 

Adjectives. 

Conlempl-tu, a, um, do- 

splscd. 
/Vi'.M-Hj, <i, mil, wearied; 

worn out 
/iiliTroiidt-ita, a, wn, Ask(>d. 
Qiiiiiiiin, (iimenain, quod- 

tiaiii, who, which, or 

wliat, pray 7 
liiipl-us, rt, um, carrieil off; 

w<M<. rnplinn, (used us 

Nubstiiutive,) plunder. 
Soliu, a, utit, alone, only. 
Vi'tiis, tvWr-M, old, uncientj 

former. 

Verbs. 

Aic, I say. 

Const-dre, to stand still, 
halt : constat, It is agreed 
upiiii ; It is evident 

K.nir-i'rc, to burn up. 

Odiidfre, to rejoice. 

llicmdrf, to puss the win- 
ter. 

Invid-ifre, to envy, grudge, 
(witli diU.) 

Muminisse, to remember. 

Odissi', to hate. 

liii/'cr re, to carry back, (r«- 
/eire pedinn, to retreat.) 

aSiistin-Ore, to bear up 
ifgainst, cnduie. 

Adverbs. 

Acritcr, keenly. 
Kijuidtm, indued, 1 for my 

part 
Eliam, also, oron. 
Late, widely. 
Minus, less. 
Xiinc, now. 
Qud(iue, also. 
^(;/«w, only. 
Tnvi'piilUiT, peacefully. 
Tu/ic, then, at that timo. 



luterjeotiou. 



0.01 



PART II 



EXTRACTS FOR READING. 



FABLES OF rilAEDRUS. 






1. THE MULE3 AND THE ROBBEES. 

Mum g]-iivftti sarcinis ihaiit duo : 
Uiius ferehat fisoos cum pcouiiia ,.^*''*^^ -^</ , . 

Alter tv.iiientcs im.lto ^ictos hordco. d />''^'^\:J 
Ille, onere dives, cclsfl, ccrvico cniinet, ^ 
ClaniiiKiue coilo jactat tintiimabulmn ; /^ /-^ g 
Comes qiiieto RO(iiiitur ct placido gradii. 

Subit6 Liitroncs ex insidiis advolant, 

Inteniue caedem ferro inuliim sauciant ; 

Biripiuiit imininos, iieglignnt vile hordcum. 

Spoliatus igitiir casus (pium fleret suos ; IQ 

Equideni, iiKiuit alter, me ountemptuui gaudco, 

Nam nihil aiuisi, ticc sum laesus vulnere. 

[Hoc argumeiito tuta est liuminum tcimitas : 

Maguae pcriclo sunt opes obnoxiae.] 



2. THE FROGS ASKING A KING. 

fATirKNAK quum florcrcnt ne'iuis legibus, 
Procax libertas civitatem miscuit, 
Frenumquc solvit jiristinuia liceutia. 
Elc couspiratis factiouuui puitibujs. 




! ! 



120 



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20 



25 



30 



: 



il I 



■ I 



FIRST LATIN READEJl. 

Arcem tyranuus occupat Pisistratiis. 
Quum tristem servitutem flerent Attici, — 
Non quia crudelis ille, sed quoniam grave 
Omne insuetis onus,— et coepissent queri ] 
Aesopus talem turn fabellam rettulit] 
Ranae, vagantes liberis paludibiis, 
Clamore magno regem petiere a Jove, 
Qui dissolutos mores vi compesceret. 
Pater Deorum risit, atque illis dedit 
Parvum tigillura, missum quod subito vadi 
Motu sonoque temiit pavidum genus. 
Hoc mersum limo quum jaceret diutius, 
Forte una tacite profert e stagno caput, 
Et, explorato rege, cunctas evocat. 
Illae, timore posito, certatim adnatant, 
Lignumque supra turba petulans insilit. 
Quod quum inquinassent omni contumelifi,, 
Alium rogantes regem misere ad Jovem, 
Inutilis quoniam esset, qui fuerat datus. 
Tum misit illis hydrum, qui dente aspero 
Corripere coepit singulas. Frustra necem 
Fugitaut inertes : vocem praecludit metus. 
Furtim igitur dant Mercurio mandata ad Jovem. 
Adui(3tis ut succurrat. Tunc contrk Deus : 
Quia noluistis vestrum ferre, inquit, bonuni, 
Malum peiferte. Vos quoque, 6 cives, ait. 
Hoc sustiuete, majus ne veniat malum. 



3. THE JACKDAW AND THE PEACOCKS. 

[Ne gloriari libeat alienis bonis, 
Suoque potius habitu vitam degere, 
Aesopus nobis hoc exemplum prodidit.] 

Tumens inani Graculus superbi^, 
Pennas, Pavoni quae deciderant, sustulit, 
Seque exornavit : dcinde contemnens suos 
Immiscuit se Pavonum fornioso gregi.. 
Ilii iiiipudeuti pcunas eripiunt avi, 
Fugattque rostris. Male nuilcatus Graculus 



FIRST LATiN RZADEH. 

Redire maerens coepit ad proprium genus; 
A quo repulsus tristem sustinuit notam. 
Turn quidam ex illis, quos prius despexerat . 
Contentus nostris si fuisses sedibus, 
Et, quod natura dederat, voluisses pati, 
Nee illam exper+us esses contumeliam, 
Nee banc repalsam tua sentiret calamitas. 



4. THE WOLF AlfD THE IAMB. 

Ad rivum eundem Lupus et Agnus venerant 
Siti compulsi : superior stabat Lupus, 
Longeque inferior Agnus. Tunc fauce improba 
Latro incitatus jurgii causam intulit. 
Cur, inquit, turbulentam fecisti raihi 
Aquam bibenti ? Laniger contra, tiraens : 
Qui possum, quaeso, facere quod qugreris, Lupe ? 
A te decurrit ad meos haustus liquor. 
Eepulsus ille veritatis viribus ; 
Ante hos sex menses male, ait, dixisti mihi. 
Respondit Agnus : Equidem natus non eram. 
Pater, hercule, tuus, inquit, maledixit mihi. 
. Atque ita correptum lacerat injusta, nece. 
I [Haec propter illos scripta est homines fabula, 
\ Qui fictis causis innocentes opprimunt.J 

\6. THE DOG AND THE PIECE OF FLESH. 
[Amittit merito proprium, qui alienum adpetit.] 

Canis per flumen, carnem dum ferret, natans, 
Lympharum in speculo vidit simulacrum suura, 
Aliamque praedam ab alio ferri putans, 
Eripere voluit : verum decepta aviditas ; 
Et, quern tenebat ore, dimisit cibum, 
Nee, quem petebat, adeo potuit adtingere. 



121 
10 



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10 



15 



y 



e. THE cow, THE SHE-GOAT, THE SHEEP, AND THE LION. 

[NcatiCAM est ndeils cum potente societae : 
Teetatur haec fabella propositum meum.] 



ammgmm 



122 



10 



FIBST LATIN READKK. 

Vacca et Capella, et patiens Ovis injuriae, 
Socii fuere cum Leone in saltibus. 
Hi quum cepissent cervum vasti corporis, 
Sic est locutus, partibus factis, Leo : 
Ego primam tollo, noniinor quia Leo ; 
Secundam, quia sura fortis, tribuetis mihi j 
Tum, quia plus valeo, me sequetur tertia ; 
Malo adficietur, si quis quartam tetigerit. 
Sic totam praedam sola improbitas abstulit. 



7. THE FEOGS AND THE STJlf. 

ViciNi Furis celebres vidit nuptias 
Aesopus, et continuo narrare incipit : 

Uxorem quondam Sol quum vellet ducere, 
Clamorem Ranae sustulere ad sidera. 
Convicio permotus quaerit Jupiter 
Causam querelae. Quaedam tum stagni incola : 
Nunc, inquit, omnes unus exurit lacus, 
Cogitque miseras aridiL sede emori : 
Quidnam futurum est, si creSirit iiberos 1 



i li 



6 



'I ' 



10 



16 



8. THE AS? AND THE LION HUNTING. 

[ViRTUTis expers, verbis jactans gloriam. 
Ignotos fallit, notis est derisui.] 

Venari Asello comite quum vellet Leo, 
Contexit Ulum frutice, et admonuit siiiiul, 
TJt insueta, voce terreret feras ; 
Fugientes ipse excipcret. Hie Auritulus 
Clamorem subito totis toUit viribus, 
Nc'oque turbat bestias miraculo. 
Quae, duni paventes exitus notos petunt, 
Leonis adtliguntur horrendo impetu. 
Qui, postquam caede fessus est, Asinum evocat, 
Jubetque vocein premere. Tunc ille iiisolens ; 
Qualis videtur opera tibi vocis nieae ? 
Insiguis, inquit,— sic, ut nisi nossem tuum 
Auimuui geuuaque, simili fugissem metu. 



FIRST LATIN READEP.. 223 

9. THE STAG AT THE FOUNTAIN. 

[Laudatis utiliora, quae contempseris, 
Saepe in -niri, haec exserit narratio.] 

Ad foutem Cervus, quum bibissct, restitit, 
Et in liquore vidit effigiem suam. 
Ibi dum ramosa mirans laudat cornua, ^ 

Crurumque nimiam tenuitatem vituperat, 
Venantam subito vocibus conterritus, 
Per campum fugere coepit, et cursu levi 
Caues elusit. Silva turn excepit fertim ; 
In qua retentis iiupeditus cornibus jq 

Lacerari coepit morsibus saevis canum. 
Tunc moriens vocera banc edidisse dicitur : 
me infelicem ! qui nunc demum intelligo, 
Utilia mihi quam fuerint, quae despexeram', 
Et, quae laud^ram, quantum luctus habuerint. 15 



10. THE FOX AND THE CROW. 

[Qui se laudari gaudent verbis subdolis, 
Fere dant poenas turpi poenitentia.] 

Quum de fenestra Corvus raptum caseum 
Comesse vellet, celsa residens arbore, 
Hunc vidit Vulpes, deinde sic coepit loqui : 
qui tuarum, Corve, pennarum est nitor ! 
Quantum decoris corpore et vultu geria 1 
Si vocem haberes, nulla prior ales foret. 
At ille stultus, dura vult vocera ostendere, 
Emisit ore caseum, quem celeriter 
Dolosa Vulpos avidis rapuit dentibus. 
Turn demum ingemuit Corvi deceptus stupor. 



10 



11. THE ASS AND THE OLD MAN. 

[In principatu comniutando civium, 

llil praeter domiui nomen mutant pauperes. 

Id ease verum, piirva haec fabella iudicat.] 



124 
6 



10 



rmST LATIN FwEADEI?. 

Asellum in prato timidvis pascebat aenex 
Is, hostium clamore subito territus, 
Suadebat Asiuo fugere, ne possent capi. 
At ille lentus : Quaeso, nura binas mihi 
Clitellas impositurum victorem putas ? 
Senex negavit. Ergo quid refert luea 
Cui serviam, clitellas duin porteiu meaa ? 



10 



12. THE UNGRATEFUL DOG. 

[Habent insidias homiuis blanditiae niali : 
Quas ut vitemus, versus subjecti inonent] 

Canis parturiens, quum rog^sset alteram, 
Ut fetum in ejus tugurio deponeret, 
Facile impetravit ; dein reposcenti locum 
Pieces admovit, tenipus exorr.ns breve, 
Dum firmiores posset catulos ducere. 
Hoc quoque consumpto, flagitare validius 
Cubile coepit. Si mihi et turbae meae 
Par, inquit, esse potueris, cedam loco. 



S 



13. THE DOGS AND THE HIDE. 

[Stultum consilium nou mudd effectu caret, 
Sed ad pemiciem quoque mortales devocat.] 

Corium depressnm in fluvio viderunt Canes. 
Id ut comesse extractum possent facilius, 
Aquam coepere ebibere : sed rupti prius 
Penere, quam, quod petieraut, contingerent 



i 



14. THE AGED LION, THE BOAE, THE BULL, AND THE ASS. 

[QuicuNQUE amisit dignitatem pristinam, 
Ignavis etiam jocus est in casu gravL] 

Defectus annis et desertus viribus 
Leo quam jaceret, spiritum extremum trahens, 
6 Aper fulmiueis ad cum venit deutibus, 



FIB3T LATIN READER. 

Et vindicavit ictu veterem injuriam. 
Infestis Taurus mox confodit comibus 
Hostile corpus, .\sinus, ut vidit ferum 
Impune laedi, caloibus fronteni extudit. 
At aie exspirans : Fortes indigne tuli ' 
Mihi insultare : te, natiu-ae dedecus, 
Quod ferre cogor, certe bis videor mo'ri. 



m 



iO 



15. THE WEASEL AND THE MAN. 

MusTELA, ab Honiine prensa, quura instantem necem 

Effligere vellet ; Parce, quaeso, inquit, mihi, 

Quae tibi molestis muribus purgo domum. 

Respondit ille : Faceres si causa meti, 

Gratum esset, et dedissera veniam supplici. fi 

Nunc quia laboras, ut fruaris reliquiis, 

Quas sunt rosuri, simul et ipsos devores, 

Noli imputare vanum beneficium mihi. 

Atque ita locutus, improbarn leto dedit. 

[Hoc in se dictum debent iUi agnoscere, jo 

Quorum privata servit utilitas sibi, 
Et meritum inane jactant imprudentibus.] 



16. THE FAITHFUL DOG. 

[Repentk liberalis stultis gratus est, 
Verum peritis inritos tendit dolos.] 

Noctumus quum fur panem misisset Cani, 
Objecto tentans an cibo posset capi : 
Heus ! inquit: linguam vis meam praecludere, 
Ne latrem pro re domini. Multum falleris. 
Namque ista subita me jubet benignitas 
Vigilare, facias ne mea culpa lucrum. 



17. THE FROG AND THE OX. 

[Ijrops, potciitcm dum vult iiuitari, perit.] 
In.prato quondam Rana conspexit Bovem, 



iri 



126 



10 



FIRHT LATIN READKS. 

Et, tacta invidia tantae magnitndiniB, 
Rugosam inflavit pellem : turn natos suos 
Interrogavit, an Bove esset latior. 
Illi negrirunt. Rursiis intendit cutem 
Majore nisu, et siniili quaesivit niodo, 
Quis major esset. Illi dixcrunt, Bovem. 
Novissini^ indignata, dum vult validius 
InHare sese, rupto jacuit corpore. 



! 



10 



18. THE DOG AND THE CROCODILE. 
[CoNsiLiA qui dant prava cautis hominibus, 
Et perdunt operani, et deridentur tiirpiter.] 

Canes currentes bibere in Nilo flumine, 
A Crocodilis ne rapiantur, traditum est. 
Igitur qmini currens bibere coepisset Canis, 
Sic Crocodilns : Quandibet lambe otio— 
Noli vereri. At ille : Facerem raehercule, 
Nisi esse scirem carnis te cupidum meae. 



19. THE FOX AND THE STORK. 

[NujAi nocendum : si quis vero laeserit, 
Multandum simili jure, fabella admonet.] 

Ad coenam Vulpes dicitur Ciconiam 
Prior invitasse, et illi in patena liquidara 
Pasuisse sorbitionem, quam nuUo mode 
Gustare esiu'iens potuerit Ciconia. 
Quae Vulpem quum revocasset, intritq. cibo 
Plenam lagonam posuit : huic rostrum inserens 
Satiatur ipsa, et torquet convivam fame. 
Quae quum lagonae coUum frustra lamberet, 
Peregrinam sic locutara volucrem accepimus : 
Sua quisque exempla debet aequo animo pati. 



20. THE FOX AND THE EAGLE. 

[QpAMvis sublimes debent humiles metuere, 
Vindicta docili quia patet solertiae.] 

Vuipinos catuioH Aquila quondam sustulit, 



HRST LATIN READER. 

Nidoqne posnit pnllls, escam ut carperent. 
Hanc persecuta mater oraro incipit, 
Ne tantum niiserae luctiini importaret sibi. 
Contempsit ilia, tuta quippo ipso loco. 
Vulpes ab ara rapuit ardentem facein, 
Totaniquo flainmis arborem circumdedit, 
Hosti doloreni darano niiscens sanguinis! 
Aquila, ut pericio mortis eriperet suos, 
Incolumes natos supplex Vulpi tradidit. 



127 



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10 



21. THE MAN AND HIS TWO LOVERS. 
[A FEMiNis utcnnque spoliari vires, 
Ament, amentur, nempe exemplis discimus.] 

Aetatis mediae quendara mulier non rudis 
Tenebat, annos celans elegantid ; 
Animosque ejusdem pulchra juvenis ceperat. 
Ambae, videri dum volunt illi pares, 
Capillos homini Iggere coepere iiwicem. 
Quum se putaret fingi curd mulifcrum, 
Calviis repente factiis est; nam funditna 
Canos Puella, nigros Anus evellerat. 



10 



22. THE EAGLE, THE CAT, AND THE BOAR. 

Aquila in sublimi quercu nidum fecerat; 
Feles cavernam nacta in media pepererat: 
Sus neraoricultrix fetum ad imam posuerat. * 
Tum fortuitum Feles contubernium 
Fraude et scelestd sic evcrtit malitia. 
Ad nidum scaudit Volucris: Pernicies, ait, 
Tibi paratur, forsan et niiserae mihi : 
Nam fodere terram quod vidos quotidie 
Aprum insidiosum, quercum vult evertere, 
Ut nostram in piano facile progeniem oppr'imat. 
Terrore offuso et perturbatis sensibus, 
Derepit ad cubile setosae suia :_ 
Magno, inquit, in pericio amit uati tui; 



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2S 



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20 



yniaT latin reader. 

Nam simiil exieris pastura cum tenero grege, 

Aquila est parata rapere porcellos tihi. 

Hunc quoquo timore postquam couiplevit locum, 

Dolosa tuto condidit scse cavo. 

Inde evagata noctu suspenso pede, 

Ubi escd 86 replevit et prolem siiara, 

Pavorem sinmlans prospicit toto die. 

Ruinam metucns Aquila ramis dcsidct : 

Aper rapiiiam vitans non prodit foras. 

Quid multa ? inediA, sunt consiunpti aim snis, 

Felique et catulis largam pracbuenint dapem. 

[Quantum homo bilinguis saepe concinnet mail 
Documentum habere stulta credulitas potest.] 



23. THE STAG AND THE OXEN. 

Cervus, nemorosis excitatus latibulis, 
Ut venatoram fugeret instantem necera, 
Caeco timore proximam villara petit, 
Et opportune se bubili condidit. 
HIc Bos latenti : Ouidnam voluisti tibi, 
Jnfelix, ultro qui ad necem cucurreris, 
Hominuraque tecto spiritum commiseris ? 
At ille supplex : Vos modo, inquit, parcite ; 
Occasione rursus erumpam data. 
Spatium diei noctis excipiunt vices. 
Frondem bubulcus adfert, nee ideo videt, 
Eunt subinde et redeunt omnes rystici, — 
Nemo animadvertit : transit etiam villicus, 
Nee ille quidquam sentit. Turn gaudens fenu 
Bubus quietis agere coepit gratias, 
Hospitium adverso quod praestiterint tempore, 
Respondit unus : Salvum te cupimus quideii) ; 
Sed ille, qui oculos centum habet, si venerit, 
Magno in periclo vita vertetur tua. 
Haec inter ipse dominus a coena redit : 
Et, quia corruptos viderat nuper boves, 
Accedit ad praesepe : Cur frondis parum est ? 
Stramcnta deisuut ? Tullere Laeu aiuiitia 




riRST LATIN READF.n. 

Quantiim est laboris ? Diun scrntatur sin-ula 
Cervi quoque alta conspicatur corniia: ° ' 
Quein convocata jubet occidi faniilid * 
i'raedain.,ue tollit. Ilacc significat fal.ula. 
Doiuuiuiu videre pluriimnu in rebus snia 



129 



24. THE PANTHER AND THE SHEPHERDS. 

[SoLET a despectis par referri gratia.] 

Panthera iniprudons olim in foveam decidit 
Videre agrcstes : alii fustes congerunt, 

Ahi onerant saxis : qiiidam coiitrh, niiseriti 

Penturae quippe, .luarnvis nemo laedorct, ' 

Misere paneni, ut sustineret spiritura. 

Nox insecuta est: abcunt securi domum, 

Quasi inventuri niortuam jjostridie. 

At ilia, vires ut rcfecit languidas, * 

Veloci saltu fovea sese liberat, 

Et in cubile concito properat gradu. 

Paucis diebus iiiterpositis, provolat, 

Pecus trucidat, ipsos i)astores necat, 
Et, cuncta vastans, saevit irato impetu 
Turn sibi timentes, qui ferae pepercerant, 
X)amnum baud recusant, tantuni pro vitA rogant. 
At Uia : Memini, qui me saxo petierit, 
Qui panem dederit; vos timere absistite • 
Illis reverter hostis, qui me laeserunt 



(128) 



25. AESOP AND THE FORWARD FELIOW. 

[SuccEssus ad perniciem multos devcn-at 1 

Aesopo quidam petulans lapidem impegerat. 
Tanto, mquit, melior. Assera deinde illi dedit 
Sic prosecutus : Plus non babeo mehercule : 
bed, unde accipere possis, monstrabo tibi 
Venit ecce dives et potens ; huic similiter 
Impinge kpidem, et dignum accipies praemium. 
Persuasus die fecit, quod monitus fuit : 
pea „^.o iciciiii, impuuentem audaciam- 
Coraprensus namque poenas persolvit cruce 

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jriRST LATIlf UEADE?.. 



30 



86. THE FLY AND THE MULE. 

MusoA in temone Bedit, et Mulam increpann ■ 

Quam tarda es ! imiuit, non vis citius progredi ] 

Vide, ne dolono n(-lluiu coiupungain tibi. 

Respondit ilia : Verbis non moveor tiiis ; 

Bed istuni tinico, sella qui prima, sedens 

Jugum flagello teniperat lento meuni, 

Et ora frenis continet spiunantibufl. 

Quapropter aiifer frivolani insolentiam ; 

Namque, ubi strigandnin sit, et ubi currendum, bcIo. 

[Hac derideri fabula nierito potest. 
Qui sine virtuto vanas exercet mlnaa.] 



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27. THE DOG AND THE WOLF. 

[Quam dulcis sit libertas, breviter proloquar.] 

Cani perpasto macie confectus Lupus 
Forte occurrit : dein salutantes invicem 
Ut restiterunt : Unde sic, quaeso, nites ? 
Aut quo cibo fecisti tantum corporis? 
Ego, qui sum long^ fortior, pereo fame. 
Canis simpliciter : Eadem est conditio tibi, 
Praestare domino si par officiura potes. 
Quod ? inquit ille. Gustos ut sis limiuis, 
A furibus tuearis et noctu domura. 
Ego vero sum paratus : nunc patior nives 
Imbresque, in silvis asperam vitanl trahens. 
Quanto est facilius mihi sub tecto vivere, 
Et otiosum largo saiiiari cibo ! 
Veni ergo mecum. Dum procedunt, adspicit 
Lupus a catenS. coUum detritum Cani. 
Unde hoc, Amice ? Nihil est. Die, quaeso, tamen. 
Quia videor acer, aUigant me interdiu, 
Luce ut quiescam, et vigilem, nox quum venerit ; 
Crepusculo solutus, qua visum est, vagor. 
Adfertur ultro panis ; de mensa su4 
Pat ossft dominus : frusta jactat familia, 
Et, quod fastidit quisque, pulmeutarium. 



«RflT LATIN RKADKn. 

Sic Bine labore venter impletiir nieiw. 

Age, Bi quo ubire est animus, est licentia ? 

Nun plane est, in.juit. Fruere, quae lauaus, Canii; ■ 

Keguaro nolo, lihor ut nou aim ujihi. 



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28. THE BROTHER AND SISTER. 

[Praeoepto monitus, naepe te considera.] 

Uabehat qnidam filiara turpissimain, 
Idemque insignem pulchrfl, facie filiiini. 
Hi speculum, in cathedra niatris ut positnni fuit 
Puenliter ludnntcs, forte inspexerant 
Hie se formosum jactat ; ilia irascitur, 
Nee gloriantis sustinet fratris jocos, 
Accipiens quipj)o cuncta in contumeliam. 
Ergo ad patrem decurrit, laesura invicem, 
Magn%e invidia criminatur filiuni, 
Vir natus quod rem feminarura tetigerit 
Araplexus ille utnimque, et carpens oscula, 
Dulcemque in arabos caritatem partiens ; 
Quotidie, inquit, speculo vos uti volo : 
Tu fonnara ne corrumpas nequitiae malis ; 
Tu faciem ut istam moribus vincaa bonis. ' 



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15 



29. THE BEES AND THE DRONES. 

Apes in alta quercu fecerant favos : 

Hos fuci inertes esse dicebant suos. 

Lis ad forum deducta est, Vespa judice. 

Quae genus utramque nOsset quuni pulcherrimo, 

Legem duabus banc proposuit partibus : 
Non inconveniens corpus, et par est color, 
In dubium plane res ut meritd venerit. 
Sed, ne religio peccet iniprudens mea, 
Alvos accipite, et ceris opus infunditc, 
Ut ex sapore mellis, et forma favi, 

Be quls nunc ae-itur. nnr'fr.r v.a«,. — j x 

-Fuel recusant : Apibjis conditio placet. 



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FIUST LATIN READER. 



15 



Tunc ilia talem protulit sententiam : 
Apertum est, quis non possit, et quis fecerit. 
Quapropter Apibus fnictuni restituo suuin. 

[Hanc praeterissem fabulam silentio, 
Si pactum Fiici non recusassent fideni.] 



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30. AESOP AMUSINQ HIMSELF. 

PuERORUM in tiirbS, quidara ludentem Atticus 
Aesopum nuoibus quum vidisset, restitlt, 
Et quasi delirum risit. Quod sensit simul 
Derisor potius, quam deridendus senex, 
Arcum retensum posuit in media via: 
Heus ! inquit, Sapiens, expedi, quid fecerim. 
Concurrit populus. Ille se torquet diu, 
Nee quaestionis positae causam intelligit. 
Novissime succumbit. Turn victor sophus : 
Cite rumpes arcum, semper si tensnm habueris ; 
At si laxaris, quum voles, erit utilis. 

[Sic Indus animo debet aliquando dari, 
Ad cogitandum melior ut redeat tibi.] 



81. THE TREES AJSH THEIR GUARDIAN ilEITIES. 

Olim, quaa vellent esse in tutela su^, 
Divi legerunt arbores. Quercus Jovi, 
Et myrtus Veneri placuit, Phoebo laurea, 
Pinus Cybebae, populus celsa Herculi. 
Minerva admirans, quare steriles sumerent, 
Interrogavit. Causam dixit Jupiter : 
Honorem fructu ne videamur vendere. 
At, mehercules, narrabit quod quis voluerit, 
Oliva nobis propter fructum est gratior. 
Tunc sic Deorum genitor atque hominum sator : 
nata, merito sapiens dic^re omnibus : 
Nisi utile est, quod facimus, stulta est gloria. 
[Niliil agere, quod non prosit, fabella admonet.] 



FIRST LATIN READEE. 

82. THE PEACOCK AND JTJNO. 

Pavo ad Junonem venit, indigne ferens, 
Cantus iuscinii quod sibi non tribuerit : 
Ilium esse cunctis auribus adniirabileni", 
8e derideri, siraul ac vocem niiserit. 
Tunc, consolandi gratia, dixit Dea: 
Sed forma vincis, vincis magnitudine; 
Niter zmaragdi collo praefulget tuo, * 
Pictisque plumis gemmeam caudam explicas. 
Quo mi, inquit, mutam speciem, si vincor sono ? 
Fatorum arbitrio partes sunt vobis datae; 
Tibi forma, vires aquilae, luscinio melos, 
Augurium corvo, laeva cornici oniina, 
Omnesque propriis sunt contentae dotibus. 

[Noli adfectare, quod tibi non est datum, 
Dslusa ue spes ad qucrelam recidat.] 



133 



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83. THE FOX AND THE QEAPES. 

Fame coacta Vulpes alta in vinea 
Uvam adpetebat, sunmiis saliens viribus ; 
Quam tangere ut non potuit, discedens ait: 
Nondnm matura est : nolo acerbam sumere. 

[Qui, facere quae non possunt, verbis elevant 
Adscribere hoc debebunt exeraplum sibi.] ' 



34. THE HORSE AND THE BOAR. 

Equus sedare solitus quo fuerat sitim, 
Dum sese Aper volutat, turbavit vaduni. 
Hinc orta lis est. Sonipes, iratus Fero,' 
A,iAilium petiit hominis, quem dorso levans, 
Rediit ad hostem. Jactis hunc telis equea ' 
Postquam interfecit, sic locutus traditur: 
Laetor, tulisse auxilium me precibus tuis ; 

~ i-.-v-!.,-,.! vCi^i, ci Uiaiui, quam sis utilis, 

Atque ita ci^egit frenoa invitum pati. 



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FIRST LATIN IlEADEn, 



Ttini maestiis ille : Parvae vindictam rel 
Duin quaero deniens, servitiitem repperi. 

[Haec iracundos admonebit fabula, 
Iinpuue potius laedi, quam dedi alteri.] 



35. THE BATTLE OP THE MICE AlTD WEASEL& 

QuuM victi Mures Mustelarum exercitu 
(Historia quorum in tabernis pingitur) 
Fugerent et artos circum trepidarent cavos, 
Aegre recepti, tamen evasenint necem. 
Duces eorum, qui capitibus cornua 
Suis ligarant, ut conspicuum in praelio 
Ilaberent signum, quod sequerentur, milites, 
Haesere in portis, suntque capti ab hostibus ; 
Quos immolatos victor avid is dentibus 
Capacis alvi mersit tartareo specu, 

[Queracunque populum tristis eventus preuiit, 
Periclitatur magnitude principum, 
Minuta plebes facili praesidio latet.] 



36. THE VIPER AND THE FILE. 

[MoKDACiOREM qui improbo dente adpetit. 
Hoc argumeiito se describi sentiat.] 
In officiuam fabri venit Vipera. 
Ilaec quum tentaret, si qua res esset cibi, 
Limam moniordit. Ilia contra contumax : 
Quid me, inquit, stulta, dente captas laedere, 
Omne adsuevi ferrum quae corrodere ? 



37. THE FOX AND THE HE-GOAT. 

[Homo, in periclum sinud ac venit, callidus 
Reperire efFugium alterius quaerit malo.] 

Quum decidisset Vulpes in puteum iuacia, 
Et aitiore ciauderetur margine, 



FIRST LATIN RKADRR. 

I>evenit Ilircus sltiens in eundem locum: 
Simul rogavit, esset an dulcis liquor, 
Et copiosus. Ilia fraudein nioliens : 
Descende, amice ; tanta bonitas est aquae, 
voluptas ut satiari non possit mea. 
Immisit se Barbatus. Turn Vulpecula 
Evasit puteo, nixa celsis comibus, 
flircu-nque clause liquit haerenteni vado. 



335 



38. MEN'S FAULTS. ' 

Pebas imposuit Jupiter nobis duas • 
Propriis repletara vitiis post tergum'dedit 
Alienis ante pectus suspendit gravein. * 

[Hac re videre nostra raala non possuruus ; 
Alu simul delmquunt, censores sumus.] 



39. THE SHE-GOATS AND THE HE-GOATS. 

Barbam Capellae quum impetr^ssent ab Jove 
llirci maerentes indignari coep6nint, 
Quod dignitatem feminae aequlssent suam 
Smite, mquit, illaa glorid rana frui, 
Et usurpare vestri ornatum muneris. 
Pares dum non sint vestrae fortitudini 

[Hoc argumentum monet, ut sustineas tibi 
H»bitu esse similes, qui sunt virtute impares J 



6 



40. THE MAN AND THE SNAKE. 
[Qui fert malis auxilium, post tempus dolet 1 

Gehi rigentem quidam Colubram sustulit 
Smuque fovit, contra se ipse misericors • ' 
Namque ut refecta est, necuit hominem' protinus 
Uanc aha quum rogaret causam facinoris, 
i^espondit : lS"e quia discat prodesse improbis. 



rr 






i 

j 




fit 



136 FIRST LATIN RKADKE. 

41. THE ANT AND THE PLT. 

Formica et Musca contendebant acriter, 

Quae phiris esset. Musca sic coepit prior : 

Conferre nostris tu potes te laudibus ? 

Ubi immolatur, exta praegusto Dciim ; 
B Moror inter aras, templa perlustro omnia. 

In capite regis sedeo, quum visum est mihi, 

Et matronarum casta delibo oscula. 

Laboro nihil, atque optimis rebus fmor. 

Quid honim simile tibi contingit, Rustica ? 
10 Est gloriosus sane convictus Deftni, 

Sed illi, qui invitatur, non qui invisus est. 

Aras frequentas : nempe abigeris, quo vcnis. 

Reges commemoras, et matronarum oscula : 

Super etiam jactas, tegere quod debet pudor 
15 Nihil laboras : ideo, quum opus est, nil babes. 

Ego graniun in liiemem quum studios^ congero^ 

Te circa munnn video pasci stercore. 

Aestate me lacessis : quum bruma est, siles. 

]\Iori contractam quum te cogunt frigora, 
20 Me copiosa recipit incolumem domus. 

Satis profecto retudi superbiam. 

[Fabella talis hominum discernit notas 

Eorum, qui se falsis ornant laudibus, 

Et quorum viitus exhibet solidum decus.] 



J) 






42. TIME. 



CcRsu volucri, pendens in novacula, 
Calvus, coniosa fronte, nudo corpore, 
(Quem si occuparis, teneas ; elapsum semel 
Non ipse possit Jupiter reprehendere ;) 
Occasionem rerum significat brevem. 
Effectus impediret ne segnis mora, 
Finxere aatiqui talem elligiem Temporifl. 



F1B«T I^TIN READKll. 



137 



KOMAN HISTORY. 



-O 



1. ROMULUS AND REMUS. 

PnocAB, rex Albanorum, Numitoreni et Amulium filios genuit. 
Numitori, qui natu major erat, regnum legavit. Plus tamen vis 
potuit quara voluntas patris. Pulso fratre, Amulius regnavit : et, ut 
Numitoremsobole privaret, Rheam Silviam, ejusfiliam, Vestae sacer- 
dotem fecit. Vestalis, fide violata, Romuluni et Reinuni uiio partu 5 
edidit. Quo coguito Amulius ipsam in vincula conjecit ; parvulos 
alveo impositos misit in Tiberim, qui tunc forte super ripas lenibus 
Btagnis erat effusus ; sed relabente flumine pueros aqua in sicco 
reliquit. Vasti</3 turn in iis locis solitudines erant. Lupa, ut fama 
traditum est, ad puerilem vagltum accurrit, infantes lingua lambit, 10 
eorum ori admovit ubera, atque se pro matre gessit. 

Faustulus, regii pecoris magister, parvulos invenit, et ad caaam 
Laurentiae uxori educandos tulit. Hi deinde adulti inter pastores 
prirao ludicris certamiiiibus vires auxere, venando saltus peragrare, 
et latrones a rapina pecorum arcere coeperunt. Quam ob rem quum' Ifl 
iis msidiati essent latrones, Remus oaptus est, Romulus vi se defendit. 
Tunc Faustulus necessitate compulsus indicavit Romulo, quis esset 
ejus avus, quae mater. Romulus statim cum armatis pastoribus 
Albam properavit. 

Interea Rcraum latrones ad Amulium regem perduxerunt, ultro 20 
accusantes, quasi Numitoris agros infestare solitus esset. Remus 
itaque Numitori ad supplicium a rege Amulio traditus est; at 
Numitor^ quum aetatem cognovisset adolescentis, et vultum matri 
Rheae simillimum inspexisset, baud procul erat quin nepotem 
agnosceret. 05 

[753 B.C.] Deinde Romulus et Remus urbcm in iisdem locis, ub? 
expositi, ubique erant educati, condiderant ; sed orta inter eos conten- 
tione, uter nomen novae urbi daret, uter conditam imperio regeret, 
auspicia adhibuere. Remus prior sex vultures, Romulus postea 
duodecim videt. Sic Romulus, augurio yictorj urbem "Romam" 30 
vocavlt. Remus, fratris ludibrio. novos transUuisse muros dicitur ; 



138 



FIRST LATIN IlKADRTl. 



eiiin iratus Rdiimhis interfecit, his increpans verbis : Sic deiiule 
pereat, quicimque alius traiisiliet moenia luea. Ita solus potitus est 
iuiperio llouiulus. 



1.1 



2. ROMULUS, 
First King of the Romans— -B.C. 753-716. 
Romulus imaginera urbis magis quam urbem fecerat ; deerant 
incolae. Erat in proximo lucus; hunc asylum fecit. Eo statim 
multitudo latronum pastommque confugit.. i Quum vero ipse et 
cives sui uxores non haberent, legates circa vicinas gentes misit, qui 
5 societatem connubiumque novo populo peterent. Nusquam benigne 
legatio audita est ; ludibrium etiam additum : Quidni feminis quoqne 
asylum aperuistis ? Id enim compar foret connubium. Romulus 
aegritudinem auimi dissimulans ludos parat ; indlci deinde fiiiitimis 
spectaculum jubet. Multi convenere studio etiam videndae novae 
10 urbis, maxime Sabini cum liberis et conjugibus. Ubi spectaculi 
tempus venit, deditaeque ei mentes cum oculis erant, turn, dato 
signo, juvcnes Romani virgines rapiunt. 

Sabini ob virgines raptas bellum adversus Romanes sumpse- 
runt. Qui qnum Romae appropinquareiit, Tarpeiam virginem nacti 
15 sunt, quae aquam forte extra moenia potitum ierat. Hujus pater 
Romanae praeerat arci. Titus Tatius, Sabinorum dux, Tarpeiae 
optionem muneris dedit, si exercitura suum in Capitolium per- 
duxisset. Ea petiit quod Sabini in sinistris raanibus gererent, 
videlicet annulos et armillas. Quibus dolose promissis, Tarpeia 
90 Sabinos in arcem perduxit. Ibi Tatius earn scutis obrui jussit ; 
nam et scuta in laevis habuerant. Sic impia proditio celeri poena 

vindicata est._^ 

Romulus acerrime in hostes impetum fecit, et in eo loco, ubi nunc 
Romanum forum est, pugnam conseruit. Primo impetu vir inter 

25 Romanos insignis, nomine Hostilius, fortissime dimicans cecidit ; 
cujus interitu consternati Romani fugere coepemnt. Jam Sabini 
clamitabant : Vicimus perfidos hospites, imbelles hostes. Nunc 
sciunt, longe alkul esse virgines rapere, aliud pugnare cum viris. 
Tunc Romulus arma ad coelum tollens Jovi aedem vovit, et statim 

HO exercitus seu forte sen divinitus restitit. Itaque praelium redinte- 
"ratur ; sed raptae mulieres crinibus passis ansae sunt se inter tela 
volantia inferre, et hmc patres, hinc viros orautes, pacem couciliaruat 



FIRST LATIN REAnRR. 



13Q 



Romulus, foedere cum Tatlo icto, Sabinos in urbein recepit. 
Centum ex senioribus elegit, quorum consilio omnia ageret, quos 
Smatons nominavit. Tres Equitum centurias constituit ; populum 35 
in trigmta Curias distribuit. His ita ordinatis, quum ad exercitum 
lustrandum concionem in campomd Caprae paludem liaberet, subito 
coorta est tempestas cum magiio fragore tonitribusque, et RoniuUis 
e conspectu ablatus est. Eum ad Decs abiisse vulgo creditum est, 
— cui rei fidem fecit Proculus Julius vir nobilis. Orta enim inter 40 
Patres et plebem seditione, is in concionem processit, jurejurando 
affirmans, Romulum a se visum augustiore forma quara fuisset, 
eumdemque praecipere, ut seditionibus abstinerent, et rem militarem 
colereut. Ita Romulus pro deo cultus, et Quirinus est appellatus. 



3. NUMA POMPILIUS, 
Second King of the Romans — b,c. 716-673. 

Successit Romulo Numa Pompilius, vir inclyta justitia et reli- 
gione. Is Curibus oppido Sabinonim accitus est. Qui quum Romaiu 
venisset, ut populum ferum religione mitigaret, sacra plurima insti- 
tuit. Aram Vestae consecravit, et ignem in ara perpetuo alendum 
virginibus dedit. Flaminem Jovis Sacerdotem creavit, eumque in- 5 
Bigni veste et curuli sella omavit. Duodecim Salios Martis sacer- 
dotes legit, qui ancilia, imperii pignora, ferre per urbem canentes et 
rite saltantes solebant. Annum in duodecim menses ad cursum 
lunae descripsit ; riefastos fastosque dies fecit ; portas Jano gemino 
aedificavit, ut essct index pacis et belli : nam apertus in armis esse ]0 
civitatem, clausus vero pacatos omnes circa populos significabat. 

Leges quoque plurimas et utiles tulit Numa. Bellum quidem 
nullum gessit, sed non. minus civitati profuit quam Romulus. Morbo 
exstinctus in Janiculo monte sepiUtus est. Ita duo deinceps reges, 
ille bello, hie pace, civitatem auxerunt. Romulus septem et trigiiita js 
regnavit amios ; Kuma tres et quadraginta. 



4. TULLUS HOSTILIUS, 

Third King of the Romans — b.o. 673-641. 

Mortuo Numa TuUus Hostilius rex creatus est. Ilic non solum 
proiimo regi dissimilis, sed lerocior etiam Romulo fuit. Eo regnaute 



140 



FIRST LATIN READER. 



M 



bellum inter Albanos et Romanos exortum est. Ducibus Ilostilio 
et Fuffetio placuit, fata utriusquo populi paucorum maiiibus com- 
5 mitti. Erant apud Romanos trigemini fratres, Horatii, trigemini 
quoque apud A-lbanos, Curiatii. Cum iis agunt reges, ut pro sua 
quisque patria diniicent ferro. Foedus ictura est ea lege, ut, unde 
victoria, ibi imperium esset. Itaque trigemini arma capiunt, et in 
medium inter duas acies procedunt. Consederunt utrimque duo 
10 exercitus. Datur signum, infestisque armis terni juvenes, magnorum 
excrcituum animos gerentes, concurrunt. 

TJt primo concursu increpuere arma, micantesque fulsere gladii, 
horror ingens spectantes perstrinxit. Consertis deinde manibus, 
Btatim duo Romani, alius super alium, exspirantes ceciderunt ; tres 
\5 Albani vulnerati. Ad casum Roraanonim conclamavit gaudio exer- 
citus Albanus. Romanos jam spes tota deserebat. Unum Hora- 
tium tres Curiatii circumsteterant. Forte is integer fuit ; sed quia 
tribus impar erat, fugam capessivit, ut eorum pugnam segregaret. 
Jam aliquantum spatii ex eo loco, ubi pugnatum est, aufugerat, 
£0 qmira respiciens videt unum e Curiatiis baud procul ab se abesse. 
In eum magno impetu redit ; et dum Albanus exercitus inclamat 
Curiatiis, ut opem ferant fratri, Horatius j am eum occiderat. Altenmi 
deinde, priusquam tertius potuit consequi, intcrfecit. 
Jam singuli supererant, sed nee spe nee viribus pares. Alteri erat 
2.5 intactum ferro coi-pus, atque animus geminata victoria ferox. Alter 
corpus vulnere fessum, fessum cursu, trahebat. Nee illud praelium 
fuit. Romanus exsultans male sustinentem arma conficit, jacen- 
temque spoliat. Romani ovantes ac gratulautes accipiunt Horatium, 
et domum deducunt. 
30 Non diu pax Albana mansit ; nam Fuffetius, dux Albanorum, 
Veientes adversus Romanos concitavit. Ipse 'a Tullo in auxilium 
arcessitus aciem in collem subduxit, ut foiiunam belli exspectaret 
et sequeretur. Postero die Fuffetius, quum ad gratulandum Tullo 
venisset, jussu illius quadrigis religatus est, et in diversa distractus. 
35 Deinde Tullus Albam propter ducis perfidiam diruit, et Albanos 
Romam transire jussit. 

Roma interim crevit Albae minis ; duplicatus ert civium numerus ; 

mons Caelius urbi additus, et quo frequentius habitaretur, earn 

Regiae sedem Tullus cepit, ihique deinde habitavit. Auctarum 

40 virium fiducia elatus bellum Sabinis indixit. Pcstilentia insecuta 

„-i. . ,11-. 4.«~..^^ «K orrnia onios /iohafnr flrpdfibat. enim rex belli- 

cosufi, salubricra militiae quam domi esse juvenum corpora ; sed 



i 



FIIiaT LATIN READER. 



141 



Ipse quoque diuhirno morbo est implicatus. Tunc adeo fractl sirnul 
cum corpore sunt spiritus illi feroces, ut nuUi rei deinceps, nisi 
sacris, operam daret. Memoraiit Tulluin fulmine ictum cum dorao 
conflagrasse. Tullua magna gloria belli regnavit annus duos et 
trigiiita. 



45 






6. ANGUS MAECIUS, 
Fourth King of the Romans—Vi.c. 640-616. 

TuUo mortuo Ancura Marcium regera populus creavit. Nuinae 
Pompilii nepos Ancus Marcius erat, aequitate et religione avo similis. 
Tunc Latini, cum quibus TuUo regnante ictum foedus erat, sus- 
tulerunt animos, et incursionem in agrum Romanum fecerunt. Ancus, 
priusquam eis bellum indiceret, legatum misit, qui res repeteret ; 5 
eumque morem poster! acceperunt. Id autem hoc modo fiebat. 
Legatus, ubi ad fines eorum veuit, a quibus res repetuntur, capito 
velato : Avdi, Jupiter ^ inquit I a udite, fines hujuspopuli I Ego mm 
publicus nuntius populi Romaru; verbis meis fides sit. Deinde 
peragit postulata. Si non deduntur res, quas exposcit, hastam in 10 
fines hostium emittit, bellumque ita indicit. Legatus, qui ea de re 
mittitwc, fecialis, ritusque belli indicendi,jusfeciale, appellatur. 

Legato Romano res repetenti superbe responsum est a Latinis ; 
quare bellum hoc modo iis indictum est. Ancus exercitu conscripto 
profectus Latinos fudit, et compluribus oppidis deletis cives Romam 15 
traduxit. Quum autem in tanta hominum multitudine facinora 
clandestina fierent, Ancus carcerem in media urbe ad terrorem 
mcrescentis audaciae aedificavit. Janiculum montem, non muro 
solum, sed etiam ponte Sublicio in Tiberi facto, urbe conjunxit. In 
ore Tiberis urbem Ostiam condidit. Pluribus aliis rebus intra paucos 20 
annos confectis, immatura morte praereptus obiit. 



6. LUCIUS TAEQUINIUS PEISCUS, 

Fifth Kitig of the Romans — b.c. 618-578. 

Anco regnante Lucius Tarquinius, urbe Tarquiniis profectus, cum 
conjuge et fortunis omnibus Romam commigravit. Additur haec 



fabula : 



ei advenienti aoiiila Tiiieum 



cnafnlif 






Ubi Tarquinius sedebat, cum magno clangore volitans, rursus capiti 







U2 



FTTWT LATm TlKATJKR. 



Savte rcposiiit; inde suWimis abiit. Tanaquil conjnx, coelestnim 
prodigiorum perita, rcgnuin ei portendi intellexit ; itaque virum coin- 
plexa sperare alta jussit. lias spes cogitationeaqiio secum portantea 
urbctii ingrcssi sunt, doinicilioquo ibi couiparato, Tarciuinius pecunia 
et industria dignitatem, atque etiam Anci regis familiar! tatera, con- 

10 secutus est, a quo tutor liberis relictus regnum intercepit, et ita 
administravit, quasi jure adeptus fuissct. 

Tarquinius Prisons Latinos bello domuit. Circum Maximum aedifi- 
cavit: mumm lapideum urbi circumdedit : beUum cum Sabinis 
gessit, in quo bello equitura centuriaa numero auxit ; nomina tamen 

ID mutare non potuit, detervitus, ut ferunt, Accii Navii auctoritate. 
Accius, ea tempestate augur inclytns, id fieri posse negabat, nisi aves 
addixissent j iratus rex in experimentum artis eura interrogavit, 
fierine posset, quod ipse mente concepisset ; Accius, auguno acto, 
fieri posse respondit. Atq2d hoc, inquit rex, agitaham, num cotem 

20 illa7n secure n(yvamla possem. Potes, inquit augur; et secuisse 

Hicitur. Tarquinius Sabinos vicit, et filiura tredecim annorum, quod 

in praclio hostem percussisset, praetexta et bulla donavit; unde 

haec ingeiiuorum puerorum insignia esse coeperunt. 

Supererant duo Anci filii, qui aegre ferentes se patemo regno 

2f, fraudatos esse regi insidiaa paraverunt. Ex pastoribus duos ferocis- 
simos deiigunt ad patrandum facinus. li, simulata rixa, in vestibulo 
regiae tumultuantur. Quorum clamor quum penitos in regiam per- 
venisset, vocati ad regem pergunt. Primo uterque vociferan coepit, 
et certatim alter alteri obstrepere. Coerciti ab lictore et jussi sunt 

30 invicem dicere. Unus ex composite rem orditur ; duraque mtentus 
in eum se rex totus avertit, alter elatam securim in ejus caput dejecit, 
et relicto in vulnere telo ambo foras se proripiunt. 



7. SEEVIUS TULLITTS, 

Sixth King of the Romans— -B.C. 578-534. 

Servius Tullius matre nobUi sed captiva natus est. Quum in 

domo Tarquinii Prisci educaretur, feruut prodigium visu eventuque 

tnirabile accidisse. Flammae species pueri dormientis caput am- 

plexa est. Hoc viso, Tanaquil summam ei dignitatem portendi mtel- 

5 lexit, conjugique suasit, ut eum non secus ac liberos suos educaret. 

Tc ^..f n»am ndnlAvit. fit fortitudins et consilio excelluit ; quare o 

Tai^quinio gener asamuptus est; et quum Tarquinius occisus esset, 



riRflT LATIN RRADKR. 



143 



Tanaqnil, celata ejus morie, populura ex superiort parte aciliiim 
allocuta ait, regem, gravi quidem sed non letali viilnere acce[)to, 
petere, iit interim, duiu convalesceret, Scrvio TiUlio dicto audientes 10 
essent. Servius itaque iniperiuni adiniuistravit. Sahinos subegit; 
niontes tres, Quirinalem, Viiiiinaleiu, Es(iuiliiuim, mbi adjuiixit; 
muro lapideo urbein circumdedit. Idem censum ordinavit, et popu- 
lum in classes et centurias distribuit. 

Servius TuUius aliquod urbi decus addere voluit. Jam turn incly- 16 
turn erat Dianae Ephesiae fauum. Id communiter a civitatibus 
Asiae factum fama ferebat. Itaque Latinonnu populis suasit, ut et 
ipsi Romae fanum Dianae cum populo Romano aedificarent. Quo 
facto boa mirae magnitudinis cuidam Latino nata dicitur, et re- 
sponsum somnio datum, eum populum summam imperii habiturum, 20 
cujus civis bovem illam immolasset. Latinus bovem ad fanum 
Dianae deduxit, et causam sacerdoti Romano exposuit. Sacerdos 
callidus dixit, eum debere prius vivo flumine manus abluere. Dura 
Latinus ad Tiberim descendit, sacerdos bovem immolavit. Ita im- 
perium civibus, sibi(pie gloriam, vindicavit. 25 

Servius Tullius filiam alteram ferocera, mitem alteram habebat. 
Duo quoque Tarquinii Prisci filii longe dispares moribus erant. 
Tulliaferox Tarquinio miti nupserat; Tillia vero mitis Tarquinio 
feroci : sed mites, seu forte, seu fraude, periernnt ; feroces similitudo 
morum conjunxit. Tarquinius Superbus a Tullia statim incitatus, 30 
advocato senatu, regnum paternum repetere coepit ; qua re audita 
Servius, dum ad curiam contendit, jussu Tarquinii gradibus dejectus 
et domum refugiens interfectus est. Tullia carpento invecta in 
forum properavit, virura e curia evocavit, et regem prima appellavit ; 
a quo jussa ex tanto tumultu decedere, quum domum rediret, jacen- t)r> 
teraque Cyprio Vico Servium trucidatum videret, per patris corpus 
carpentum egisse fertur. Inde vicus ille sceleratus dictus est. Ser- 
vius TuJIius regnavit annos quatuor et quadraginta. 



8. TARQUINIUS SUPEEBUS, 

Seventh C7id last King of the Romans — b.c. 5.34-510. 

Tarquinius Superbus regnum sceleste occupavit. Strenuus tamen 

bello Latinos Sabinosque domuit. Urbem Gabios in potestatera 

redegit fraude Sexti filii. Is quum indigne ferretj earn urbem a Metre 

expugnari non posse, ad Gabinos se contulit. I'atris saevitiam in se 



iJf' 



144 



FTRST T.ATTN READER, 



5 conquerens. Benigne a Gabinis exceptus, paullatim eomm bene- 
volentiaiQ fictis blanditiis alliciendo dux belli electus est. Turn 
e suis unuiu ad patrein inittit Bciscitatuin, quidnain se facere vellet. 
Pater nuntio filii uibil respondit, sed in liortum aedium transiit, 
ibique inambulans, sequente nuntio, Buninia papaverum capita baculo 

10 decusslt. Nuntius fessus exspectando redUt Gabios. Sextus ubi ex 

tacitis ambagibus intellexit, quid vellet pater, primores civitatis in- 

teremit. Sic res Gabina regi Romano sine uUa dimicatione traditur. 

Postea TarquiniuB Ardeam urbem oppugnavit. Ibi quum in cas- 

tris esscnt, Tarquinius CoUatinus, sorore regis natus, forte coena- 

15 bat apud Sextum Tarquinium cum aliis juvenibus regiis. Incidit 
de uxoribus mentio; quum unusquisque suam laudaret, placuit 
experiri. Itaque citatis equis Romam avolant. Regias nurus in 
convivio et luxu deprehendunt. Pergunt inde CoUatiam. Lucre- 
tiam CoUatini uxorem inter ancillas in lanificio inveniunt. Ea ergo 

20 ceteris praestare judicatur. Paucis interjectis diebus Sextus CoUa- 
tiam rediit, et Lucretiae vim attulit. Ilia postero die, advocatis 
patre et conjuge, rem exposuit, et se cultro, quern sub veste ah- 
ditum habebat, occldit. Conclamat vir paterque, et in exitiuu) 
regum conjurant. Tarquiuio Romam redeunti clausae sunt urbia 

25 portae, et exsilium indictuni. 



9. LUCIUS JUNIUS BRUTUS, 

First Roman Consul — B.C. 509. 

L. Junius Brutus, sorore Tarquinii Superbi natus, quum eamdera 

fortunam timeret, in quam frater inciderat, ^ui obdivitias et pruden- 

tiam fuerat ab avunculo occisus, stultitiam fiaxit, unde Brutus dictus 

est. Profectus Delphos cum Tarquinii filiis, quos pater ad ApoUinera 

5 muneribus honorandum miserat, baculo sambuceo aurum inclusum 
Deo donum tulit. Peractis deinde mandatis patris, juvenes ApoUinera 
consuluerunt, quisnam ex ipsis Romae regnaturus esset. Respon- 
Bum est, eum Romae summam potestatem habiturum, qui primus 
matrem osculatus esset. Tunc Brutus, velut si casn prolapsus 

10 cccidisset, terram osculatus est, scUicet quod ea communis mater 
omnium mortalium esset. 

Expulsis regibus duo consules creati sunt, L. Junius Brutus et 
rpoj-niiinins CoUatinuSj Lucretiae maritus. At libertas, modo parta, 
per dolum et proiiitiouem paene amissa est. Erant in juventuta 



FinaT LATIN READER. 



145 



Romaua adolescentes aliquot godales Tarquiniorum. Hi de acci- ifl 

niiob in societatem coiisiln agsiuuimt. Serinouem eonim ex servia 
unu. excepit ; rem a.i consules dcttUit. Scriptue ad Ta'X a 
hUerae majiifeatum faoitnis feoerunt. Proditores in vincurcl " 
Bunt, deinde damnati. Stabant ad pdum deligati juvenr nob 20 

v^2 e^r '" ««'^«'"/':^«^«r« 8uam,mis8ique lictores nudatos 
v^gifl caedunt, secunque fermnt. Supplicii non spectator modo sed 
et exactor era Brutus, qui tunc patrem exuit, utL«uIen 4e;et 

Tarquimus deuide bello aperto regnum recuperare tentavi EouV 25 
ibu. pn^erat Aruns Tarquinii filius ; rex ipse' cum legionL us fequo^ 
batur Obviam hosti consules eunt. Brutus ad exi^orandum cum 
^m^bus antecessit. Aruns, ubi Bnitum agnovit, indammat^ ra^ 
Me est mr, mquit, qui nos patria expuHt; m ille rmtri, decoratm 
^nngn^ly, magnifice mcedU. Tum concitat calcaribus "uumTaTq" 30 
m IP urn consulem dirigit; Brutus avide se certamini otfert. aL 
infestis ammis concurrerunt, ut ambo ha^ta transfixi cec derint 
uga us est tamen Tarquinius. Alter consul Romam t^m > 1 s' 

red t. Bruticollegaefunus,quantopotuitapparatu, fecit. Brutum 
matronae, ut parentem, annum luxe ant. 3^, 



10. WAR WITH PORSENA. 

Horatius Codes— b.o. 508. 

Porsena, rex Etruscorum, ad restituendos in regnum Tarauinios 

cum infesto exercitu Romam venit. Primo impetu JanTcdu" Tenft 

Non mjquam alia, ante tantus terror Romanos'^inva^itT exT^fin 

urbem demigrant; urbem ipsam sepiunt praesidiis Alia urEa^ 

hostibus dedi , nisi unus vir fuisset Horatius Codes, iUocognoS 
donatus, quod m aJio praelio oculum amiserat. Is extrema Tnt^! 
parte occupata,aciemhostium solus sustinuit,dnecp^^^^^^^^^ 

in iiDerim desUuit, et multis superincidentibus telis incolumis ml in 
8U.S transnavit. Grata erga tantam virtutem dvitas uiV eSum 
agn datum est, quantum uno die .ir-an-j-ari ^-' -' ^^"^ 
quoque ei in Comitio posita. " -"^-^""'^*" i'— «^. o^iua 
(W3) 10 



146 



FIRST LATIW KEADIBB. 






Miicius Scaevola—B.o. 508. 

Quum Powena Romam obsideret, Mucius vir Romanac constantiae 

senatum adiit, et veniam transfugiendi petiit, necera regis repro- 

mittens. Accepta potestate in castra Porscna^ vemt. Ibi in con- 

fertissimaturbaprope regium tribunal constitit Stipendmm tunc 

6 forte miUtibus dabatur, et scriba cum rege pan fere ornatu sedebat 
Mucius ignorans uter esset rex scribara pro rege occldit. Appre- 
hensus et ad regem pertractus dextram accenso ad sacrificmm foculo 
iniecit, hoc supplicU ab ea exigens, quod in caede peccasset. Attom- 
tus mi^aculo rex juvenem amoveri ab altaribus juss.t. Turn Mucins, 

10 quasi beneficium reraunerans -^mmZoyt^i^m, inquit, e.^ apud te 
lirtuti hmos, lenefido a me mcipies, quod minis neqmsti;^ trecentx 
conjuravimusprincipesjuventutis R<muz7Uie, ut in te fuze vm gras^ 
aremur. Mea prima sors fuii : Ceteri, mo qnisque tempore aderunt. 
Qua re Porsena territus beUum acceptis obsidibus deposuit. 

Cloelia Virgo— B.C. 508. 

Porsena Cloeliam, virginem nobilem, inter obsides accepit Quum 

Etruscorura castra baud procul a ripa Tiberis locr.ta essent, Cloe la 

deceptis custodibus noctu egressa, equo, quem sors dederat, arrepto, 

Tiberim trajecit. Quod ubi regi nuntiatum est, primo lUe incensus u-a 

5 Romam legates misit ad Cloeliam obsidem reposcendam. Romam 
eam ex foedere restituerunt. Turn rex virginis virtutem admiratus 
eam laudavit, ac parte obsidum donare se dixit, permisitque,ut ipsa, 
quos vellet, legeret. Productis obsidibus Cloeha virgines e egit, 
quarum aetatem injuriae obnoxiam sciebat, et cum us in patriam 

10 rediit. Romani novam in femina virtutem novo genere honoris, 
s?alua equestri, donavere. In .umma Via Sacra fuit posita virgo 
insidens equo. 

11. WAR WITH THE LATINS. 

Aulm Postumius-Battle of Lake Regaius-^.G. 496. 

Tarquinius eiectus ad Mamilium Tusculanum, generura suum, con- 

fugerat. Qui quum, concitato Latio, Romanos graviter urgeret, nova 

Rorna^ dignitas creata, ^m^ Dictaiura appellata est, major quam 

Consulatus. Tunc etiam creatus est Magister Eqmtum, qui Dicta- 

6 tori obsequeretur. A. Postumius dictator factus cum hostibas apud 

_ ... , ..__^;_:i. TTu: „,inm viffnrift nutaret. magisvof 

equitum equis fraenos detrahi jussit ut irrevocabili impetu ferren- 



PIMT LATIN RKAT>KR. 



U7 



qMni,!^? '* ^''"^ ^*^"'"™ ^"'^'"^"*' «* "^^'^ ««P«"'r.t. Tar. 

„ 10 

12. MENENIUS AGEEPPA. 
Secession to the Sacred M<mnt~In.tituiion of the Tribuni PUis- 

B.c. 494. 
Menenius A^ppa concordiam inter patres plebemque restituit 

tnbuta et mUitiam non tolciaret, Agrippa vir facundus ad plebem 

f ertur. Humana olira membra adversiis ventrem, quum otiosiim esse fi 
cernerent, d.cordarunt, conspiraruntque, ne man^ ad os dbum^ 
rent, neu os acciperet datum, neu dentes conficerent. At. dum ventrem 
domarevolunt,.psi quoque defecerunt, totumque cois ad ex"^ 
mam tabem vemt. Inde appaniit, ventris quoque baud segne mid^ 
dlZre'S '""'"' ""^'" "'" concoquere et per omn^mrb" ,0 

ironlt ^^' '^"^ ''.'' ^"'^"^ ^^^^^™"*- Sic senatuB et popu- 
lus quasi unmn corpus discordia pereunt, concordia valent. 

Hac fabula Menenius flexit hominum mentes. Plebs in urbem 
regressa est ; creavit tamen tribunos, qui libertatem suam X^u^ 
nobJi^tis superbiam defenderent. Paullo post mortuus est Men ! 15 
mus, vir per omnem vitam pariter patribus ac plebi cams Is tamen 
m tanta paupertate decessit, ut eum populusUatr^uacilS 
eepeliret, locum sepulcro senatus publice daret 1'^^^'^^'>"8 



' 13. THE DECEMVIEL 

B.C. 451-449. 
Anno trecentesimo ab urbe condita :)ro duobu,s consulibus Decem- 
^n creati sunt, qui allata. e Graecia leges populo propon el 
Hae leges duodecim tabulis sunt perscriptae P^Po^ewnt. 

quarouum'Zt"' ^r^f'"''^'"'' ^^^'^^"^ ^'^^^'^"^ ^^^--t; 

eperauB, quum ipse esset et accusator ft judex. L Virmius 
puellae pater, tunc aberat milif!«a .ono„ niL- .•_.._.. \'^f'^'^» 
enti in forum (ib; namque m tabemis ludi litterarum erant) injecit 



IT" 



148 



FIBST LATIN RRADETt 



! 



1:^ ' 




10 manura, affirnmns suam esse servam ; earn Beqm bo jubet ; m fa^iat, 

m'natu; Be cuncUntem vi abstracturum. Pavida pueUa stupente, ad 

clamorcm nutricis fit concursus. Claudius, qumu imellam uon posset 

viabduccrc,vocatinjusipsoAppiojudico. 

luterea missi nuntii ad Virgininm properaut. Is prima luce 

16 Roiuam advcnit, quum jam civitas in foro crecta expectatione staret. 
VirKiuius statim in forum lacrimabundus, et civium opem nuplorans 
filiam suam deducit. Appius obstinato animo in tribunal escend^t 
et Virginiam clienti buo addixit. Tum pater, ubi mhd usquanx 

auxUii vidit: Quaeso, m^^, ^PPh i^'^''JJ''''^\'^'^r {."^Z 7^ 

20 Jlliam vltinvuM alloqrcL Data vonia, fiham seducit, a^ue ex 

•taberna lanionis cultro arrepto, pectus puellae transfigit Turn ferro 

Bibi viam facit, et respersus cruore ad exercitum profugit Concita- 

tus exerctus montem Aventinum occupavit; decern tnbunos mdi- 

t^m crS; decemvia« magistratu se abdicare coegit ; eosquo 

25 Tnes ^morte aut exilio mulcavit. Appius Claudius m carccrem 

conjectus mortem sibi conscivit. 



U. MARCUS FUMUS CAHIllOS. 

ne &hootmmUr of Fda-ii-Rom takm by the OmO,- 

B.o. 390. 
Onum M Furius CamiUus iirbem Falerios oteidcrct, ludi magUtoi 
riSo et nobilissimos hide pueros, velut ambulandi gratia eductos 
ta ZmEomanorum perduxit; quibus Camfflo tr^. .., non en^ 
Ltarquin FalUoi dcposito bello sese Eomanis dcditun essent 
K^a clS perfidiam proditoris detestatus: Nmad nmJ^tm, 
^li?^«^ ir»«' 't lui. sicut pads, Jura: arma «««.,«» 

quam armis victi, portas Romanis aperuemnt. .^^^atus 



PIRaT LATTN RKADER. 



149 



■:il 



Romania auxilitim poticmnt. Missi sunt Roma tres legati, qui 
Gallos monerent, ut ab oppugnatione desisterent. Ex his legatia 
unus contra jus gentium in aciem proccssit, et ducem Senonura 20 
interfecit. Qua re commoti Galli, petitis in deditionem legatis nee 
impetratis, ad urbcm vencnint, et exercitum Romanuni apud AUiam 
fluvium cecidcrunt ante diem deciraum quintum Calendas Sextiles j 
qui dies inter nefastos relatus Alliensis dictus est. 

Galli victores paullo ante solis occasum ad urbera Romam per- 25 
veniunt. Postquam hostes adesse nuntiatum est juventus Romana 
duce Manlio in arcem confugit ; seniores vero domes ingressi ad- 
ventum Gallorum obstinato ad mortem animo exspectabant. Qui 
eorum curules magistratus gesserant, omati honorum insignibus in 
vestibulia aedium eburneis sellis insederunt, ut, quum venisset hostis, 30 
111 sua dignitate morerenti"-. Interim Galli, domos patentes ingressi, 
vident viros ornatu et vuuus majestate Dils simmimos. Quum Galli 
ad eos, veluti ad simulacra, conversi starent, unus ex his senibna 
dicitur Gallo barbam suam permulcenti scipionem ebumeum in caput 
mcussisse. Iratus Gallus eum occidit ; ab co caedis initio facto, ceteri Qr, 
omnes m sedibus suis trucidati sunt. 

Galli deinde impetum facere in arcem statuunt. Primo mUitcm, 
qui tentaret viam, praemiserunt. Tum nocte sublustri, sublevantes * 
invicem et trahentes alii alios, in summum saxum evaserunt, tanto 
sdentio, utnon solum custodes fallerent, sed ne canes quidem excita- 40 
rent. Anseres non fefellere, quibus in summa inopia Romani abstinu- 
want, quia aves erant Junoni sacrae ; quae res Romania saluti fuit. 
Namque clangore anserum alarumque crepitu excitus Manlius, vir 
bello egregiue, ceteros ad arma vocans Galloa ascendentea dejecit. 
_ Tunc consenau omnium placuit ab exsilio Camillura acciri; misai 46 
igitur ad eum legati, ipseque dictator absena creatus est. Interim 
fames utrumque exercitum urgebat ; sed ne Galli putarent, Romanos 
ea necessitate ad deditionem cogi, multis locis de Capitolio panis 
jactatus est m hostium stationes. Ad postremum, Galli quoque ob- 
sidione fatigati pretio mille pondo auri adducti sunt, ut obsidionem 60 
relinquerent. Nondum omni auro appenso, Camillus dictator, col- 
lectia Romani exercitus reliquiis, intervenit ; auferri aurura de medio 
jubet, denuntiatqua Gallia, ut se ad proelium expediant. Instructa 
demde acie Gallos internecione occidit. Ne nuntius quidem cladis 
rehctus est. Dictator, recuperata ex hostibus patria, triumphans 66 
urbem Uigrcssus, et ss mllitibus parens patriae conditwgue aLur 
urbis appellatufl est. 



1 1 
'if J 



APPENDIX. 



BRIEF SYNOPSIS OF THE SYNTAX OF SIMPLE 

SENTENCES. 



■n 

i 



Obs. 



I, SUBJECT AND PREDICATE. 
AGREKMKNT. 

1 Wetit -An adjective (whether pronoun, participle, or adjective 
orLrTa^ees with its own substantive in gender, number, and case: as 

'^ ott WhfraT^dSSe applies to two or more singular substahtivea 
coiSed by a co-ordinative conjunction [et, a«, atque, &c. . it la 
pufrthe plural number; as. Pater et fiUus sunt clan, Ih. 

father and son are famous. , ^ ■• e A-.r 

i When an adjective applies to two or more substantives of dif- 
ferent gender , it takes the gender of the masculme substantive 
rather than that of the feminine, and of the feminine rather than 
nf the neuter : Pater et mater pucUae sunt morttn. 
£OT<to».-But when the substantives are names of inanimate 
olTecCthe adjective is put in the neuter; as, nrtus et mHun. 
inter se contraria mnt, Virtue and vice are opposed to each other. 
3 But r adjective often agrees with the substantive nearest 
to itTas, Pater mem et mater abeunt : or it is repeated before 
pich • as. Pater mens et mater m£a abeunt. 
2 Rui^-A revh agrees with its subject in number and person : as, 

^Cl Si-e tw" nti a Pl-al, two or more singular 

BuWecteronnectedbyaco-ordinativeconjunction(e^ao,a«?«*,&c.^ 

have a veTin the plural ; as, Pater etfiUv. ambvlant vn h^to 
^Sl -But in a series of nominatives the verb of ->n agrees with 
^thTsuSect nearest to it; as, Amat te pater, et^,.^ etfratr^ 
2 If the subjects be of different persons, the verb is put i° the first 
'•person rather than in the second, and in ^^^^^^^^^t^^^^' ^^^^. 
in the third : as, Ego et tu sumus amici; Tu et Ma esUs cl^i^ 
Si tu et TuUia valetis, eyo et Cicero valemus, If you and Tuilia 
are weii, Uicero and I aio y^ e"- - 

predicates. 



Obs. 



Obs. 



THE CASES. 



157 



Ob9. 3. A collective noun, or a distributive pionoun, may have a verb 
in the plural: as, Turba ruunt, The mob rush forward : Uteraue 
^meductmt capias ex castm, Each of them {i.e., both) leads 
his forces out of the camp ; Decimtu, quisque ad supplicium lecU 
sunt, Jivery tenth man was selected for punishment. 

APP08ITI0M. 

3. Rule. -Substantives which stand in apposition* to one another 
aicree in case : as, Cicero, orator, jiusm AntonU occum est, Cicero the 

tortnthum, urbem Oraeaae nobUissimam, Mummius destroyed Corixith a 
very famous city of Greece, ' 

Oba. 1. The same rule applies when the second substantive is used as a 
predicate : as Alexander erat rex Macedonum, Alexander was 
king of the Macedonians ; Ilia incedit regina, She walks (as) a 
queen. This kind of apposition occurs with (1) Scbstantivb 
Verbs, (as, mm, existo); (2) Passive Verbs of naming and 
CHOOSING, (as, nominor, creor) ; (3) Veebs of eseming or 
BEING THOUGHT, (as, videor, existimor); (4) Verbs of gesture. 
\as, mcedo.) ' 

2. A noun in apposition to two or more nouns is usually in tLe 
plural : as, M. Antonius, C. Crassus, tyibuni pkbis, M. Antony 
and 0. Crassus, tribunes of the people ; Cn^ius et PuUius 
^ctpiones, Cueius and Publius Scipio. 

3 If the substantive in apposition have two forms (masculine and 
teminine), it generally assumes the gender of the noun explained • 
&s, Leo, rex bestiarum, Tlie lion, king of beasts ; AquUa, regim 
avium, The eagle, king of birds. * v "* 



Oba. 



Oba. 



n. THE CASEa 
NOMlnATIVE AND VOCATIVE. 

4. The nominative is used to express the subject of the sentence, or the 
substantival' predicate. (See Art. 2 and 3 above. ) 

5. The vocative is used in expressions oi address; as, Fili, son I but 
the nominative often takes the place of the vocative, even in address. 

ACCUSATIVE. 

6. The accusative expresses the direct object of the action indicated by 
a transitive verb. It answers to the questions, Whom ] What ? To what 
place ? During what time ? &c. 

7. RoLE.-Transitive verbs govemf the accusative ; as, Pater amat 
fihum sujim. The father loves his son. [But many transitive verbs govern 
19 fl"]' "' ^"^^^*'^^«' S^« ^'^- 16, (5); 17, (2), (a); 19, (2), (c); 



t Sue tiulc3 * niui t, p. ZO. 



I 



i) 



152 



APPENDIX. 



8. Any verb, whether it be transitive or intransitive, may govern in 
the accusative a substantive of kindred signification : as, Vivere beatam 
vitam, To live a happy life ; Puf/nare pugnam, To fight a battle, 

9. The accusative is used after certain prepositions ; for which see 
p. 101, 5. 

10. Many intransitive verbs of motion, when compounded with the pre- 
positions, trans, circum, per, super, praeter, ad, cum, in, subter, become 
transitive, and thus take an accusative ; as, Transire flumen, To cross a 
river. [But some of these compounds, as supervenio and subeo, occasion- 
ally take the dative.] 

11. Many verbs are followed by two accusatives, the one expressing the 
person, the other the thing. Such are verbs of asking,* entreating, teach- 
ing, concealing, &c. : as, Filius patrem nihil celavit, The son concealed 
nothing from his father ; Hoc te rogo, I beg this of you. Also transitive 
verbs compounded with trans; as, Transducere capias flumen, To lead 
forces over a river. But the preposition is often repeated before the 
accusative. 

12. An accusative is often put after intransitive verbs, passive forms, 
and adjectives, to define them and limit their application. This is called 
the accusative of reference or limitation ; it is very common in poetry, — 
less so in prose, especially in the case of intransitive verbs and adjectives : 
as, Rogor sententiam, I am asked my opinion'; Qui gentis {&cc.) estisi Who 
are you as to descent ? Saucius pedes. Maimed in the feet. 

13. After verbs expressing or implying motion, the names of towns and 
small islands, with domus, rus, and such terms, are put in the accusative, 
to indicate the point to which; as, Contendit Romam, He hastens to Rome ; 
Misit legatos Athenas, He sent ambassadors to Athens ; Rediit domum. 
He returned home. [But with the names of countries and large islands a 
preposition is used.] 

14. The accusative expresses duration of time and extent of space : as, 
Viginti annos mansit, He remained for twenty years ; Duxitfossam tri- 
ginta pedes altam, He ran a ditch of thirty feet deep. 

15. The accusative is used in exclamations, either with or without an 
interjection ; as, Me miserumi (or me miserumi) Wretched me ! lieu 

' me infelicem/ Ah, luckless me ! 



,11; 



THE GENITIVK, 

16. The genitive case answers to the questions, Whose 1 Of whom 1 Of 
what ] It is used to indicate, — 

(1.) The author or possessor : as, Ciceronis filius, Cicero's son ; Agricolae 
hortus, The farmer's garden. 

(2.) The part, duty, or characteristic, (with sum) : as. Est regii ad- 
ministrare leges, It is the king's duty to execute the laws ; Stulti 
est irae servire, It is the mark of a fool to be a slave to passion. 
But the possessive pronouns meum, tuum, &c., are used in the 
nomthative singular neuter ; as, Meum est, It is my duty. 

* Peto, poitvlo, and quaero take the ablative with a preposition, (at. de, ex.) 



THE CASES. 



153 



see 



(3.) The whole of which anything is a part {partitive genitive); as, 
Magna vis hominum, A great multitude of men ; Tria mUlia 
equitum, Three thousand cavalry ; Mvltum pecuniae, Much 
money ; Quis nostruinf Which (one) of us 1 Doctmimus iJmon- 
orum : Ubi terrarum? In what part of the earth ? 
(4.) The quality, nature, extent, &c.; but in these cases it is accom- 
panied by an adj. : as, Puer magni ingenu, A boy of great talent : 
Classis ducentarum navium, A fleet of two hundred ships 
(5.) The object of mental affectiarui, (a) after adjectives denoting' know- 
ledge, memory, certainty, inclination to, patience, and their oppo- 
Bites: as, Ignarusmali, Ignorant of misfortune ; Memor beneficii. 
Mindful of afavour ; Avidua gloriae, Desirous of fame ; Amantior 
virtuiis, A greater lover of virtue: (6) after verba signifying to 
remember,* pity, forget, &c., and certain impersonal verbs, (see 
p. 98, 9 :) as, Meminit malorum praeteritorum. He remembers 
past misfortunes ; Miserere servorum. Have pity on the slaves • 
Taedet me vitae, I am weary of life. ' 

'6.) The object after adjectives expressing plenty, f power, participation, 
Itkeness,^ and their opposites : as, Plenus sapientiae, Full of 
wisdom ; Inops rationis. Devoid of reason ; Similis patris, Like 
his father (in nature, disposition, &c.) 
(7.) The price or value (in a general way), in the ca^e of such adjectives 
as magnus, plurimus, plus, minor, &c. : as, A varus divitiat 
magm aestimat, The avaricious man seta a great value on riches- 
Pravum minimi habeo, I have the very lowest opinion of the 
wicked man. [If a substantive is used to indicate the price, it 
is put in the ablative ; and even with these adjectives the abla- 
tive is often used. See Art. 19, (5.)] 
(8.) The crime or ground of acmsation : as, Pwrum furti arguit, He 
accused the boy of theft ; Judices civem proditionis damnaverunt. 
The judges condemned the citizen of treason. 
(9.) Pla<;e where, in nouns of the First or Second Declension, and 
singular number; as, Vivebat Romae, He lived at Rome. [For 
the theory which regards this as the dative, see Schmitz's Ad- 
vanced Latin Grammar, § 268.] 

THE DATIVE. 

17. The dative case denotes, — 

(1.) The individual (person or thing) to whom anything is given or 
communicated : as, Dedit librum puero. He gave a book to the 
boy ; Lcgati nunciant Caesari, The lieutenants report to Caesar. 

(2.) The individual who is benefited or injured in any way : as, Avarm 
non sibi sed aliis divitias parat ; Pastor insidias lupo parat. 
The shepherd lays snares for the wolf; Vaco philosophiae, I have 
leisure for (the study of) philosophy ; Monstravit viam agricolae, 
He pointed out the road to the farmer. 



Ver^5 sigiiifi-hig to remmnbcr ami forget also take the accusative, 
t A(yective8 of plenty and want also take the ablative. 

See Art. 17, 2, C3i) 



U 



II 



t Adjectives of likeness and unlikeuess also take the dative. 



154 



APPENDIX. 



ia) N- B,-Th\s principle of " advantage or disadvantaRe is a very 
general one, and to it may be referred by far the greater number 
of instances in which the dative occurs. It ia more especially 
manifest in verbs which signify (1) to study, consult for, help, 
profit, favour, heal, spare, indulge: (2) to Hatter, please, displease; 
serve, obey, disobey; envy, be anirry with, upbraid ; resist, 
obstruct, hurt : (8) to meet, congratulate, trust, marry (ot the 
female, nu6cre), persuade, command/ 

(6) So adjectives such as (1) friendly, just, useful, profitable, suit- 
able,T necessary, &c. ; (2) hostile, unprofitable, unnecessary &c. ; 
(3) near to, like, (in external8,-See Art. 16, 6,) equal, related 
to, &c. , govern the dative. 

(c) Most verbs compounded with the ten prepositions, ad, ante—tn, 
inter-post, prM-sub, super-con, (i.e., cum,) and ob, (and 
many verbs compounded with other prepositions, as ab, ctrcum, 
de, ex, (re), &c.,) take the dative of the person or thing affected ; 
as. Terrorem hostibua injccit, He caused a panic among the 
enemy ; Antefert tgnotos notis, He prefers the unknown to the 

{d) Tht dative sometimes expresses the possessor ; as, Est mihi liber, 

I hive a book. v, rr is frJv*. 

(e) Two datives are sometimes used after the verbs, io oe, give, 
come, send, impute,^ &c.-the one expressing the person bene- 
fited, and the other the object, end, or result of the action : as, 
Est mihi voluptati. It is a source of pleasure to me ; Caesar tres 
cohortes mtsit auxilio novmimis, Caesar sent three cohorts to 
aid (K«era//»/, for aid to) the rear-guard. , , ,, . . , 

(3 ) The dative is often used after passive verbs to denote the principal 
agent, instead of the ablative with a or ab; as, Noii. vutelUgUur 
ulli, (= ab tUlo.) 




THE ABLATIVE. 

18. The ablative ia used in Latin to express those relations which in 
English we indicate by the prepositions, from, with, m, by, at, &c. 

19. It denotes,— -.1,1 
(1 ) The cause or reason ; as, Ardeo studio, I burn with zeal. 

(2.) The instrummt, meam, or material : as, Necat hoslem ense,Re 

slays the enemy with a sword ; Mundus sok illustratur, The 

world is illuminated by the sun ; Vivunt la^te et came, They live 

on milk and flesh. 

(a) Under this head come the adjectives, contentus, natus, ortu3, 

&c. 



• But>«w, laedo, delecto, offendo, regojnbeo, and gubemo, govern the accusati%e, 
and ewme of the above list take the accusative with the dative. 

t tiuUhoVe denoting fitness or unfitness more frequently take the accusative, with 
ad ■ as, Locus aptus ad tnsidias, A place fittea ror an ambush. 

, ^e verbs most commonly followed by a double dative arc, su.n, J.>. duco, trtbuo, 
aeno, aoctj»o, re/t««uo, deligo.mtito, vtnw, ImUco. 



\\ I 



THK CASES. 



155 



(ft) If the agent be a person, the preiosition a or ab is used : as. 
Afwndu» a Deo regitur, The world is ruled by God ; Caaar 
certior factm ett ab exploratoribus, Caesar is certified by scouts. 
Sometimes the accusative with per or propter; as, Per te liber- 
atus rum, I was freed by your means, 
(c) The deponent verbs utor, abutor, fruor, fuvgor, potior* and 
rcacor, govern the ablative: as, Utitur fraude, He employs de- 
ceit; Fwngitv.r offieiia, He performs his duties. [These are 
/o X ml"^^^ instances of the "cause, manner, or instrument "] 
(3.) The mode or manner: as. Fecit suo more, He did it in his own 

way ; Hoc modo scripsi, I wrote in this way. 
(4.) Supply, with verbs and adjectives signifying plenty, abundance, 
tiling, emptying, &c. : as, Germania fiuminibus abmdat, Ger- 
many abounds in rivers; Caret omni culpa, He is free from eveiy 
fault ; Eget pecunia, He is in need of money ; Plenut ira. Full 
of wrath ; Praeditm est virtute. He is endowed with virtue' 
(S.) Price, with verbs of buying, selling, valuing, hiring, &c. ; also'with 
the adjectives, dignus, indignus: as, Patriam auro vendidit 
He sold his country for gold ; Dig7ius laude, Worthy of praise 
But see above. Art. 16, (7.) > ^ V a'se. 

(6.) Limitation, expressed in English by as to, in regard to &c • as 
Aeger pedibus. Diseased in (as to) his feet ; Captus oadit'. 
Blind ; Gallus natione, A Gaul by birth ; Major natu, Older 
(by birth); Pietate filius. In affection a son. 
(7.) Separatism, after verbs of removing, freeing, depriving &c • as 
Caesar castra loco movit, Caesar shifted his camp from the place' 
(8.) Quality, when conjc ined with an adjective : as, Vir fuit summo in- 
ffenio. He was a min of consummate talent; Statura fwit humili 
He was of low sta'.ure. [But see 16, (4.)] ' 

(9.) Measure, with con.paratives and superlatives to express excess or 
defect ; as, Mulco major, Much greater. 
(10.) Superiority cr inferiority, with comparatives to express the ob- 
ject with which comparison is instituted : as, Major patre 
Greater than his father ; Filia ptUchrior matre, A daughter more 
beautiful than her mother. 
<11.) Tiine when : as, Trecentesimo anno, In the three hundredth year- 
Quinto die, On tlie fifth day. ' 

(12.) (a) Place whence; as, Profectus est Corintho, He set out from 
Corinth : (6) Place where, if the noun be of the Third Declen- 
Bion or plural number : as, Mortuus est Carthagine, He died 
at Carthage; Vivebat Athenis, He lived at Athens. FBut see 
16, (9.)] '• 

(13.) The ablative is used with certain prepositions; for which see 
p. 101, 5, (2.) 

(14.) The ablative is used with certain verbs compounded with the prepo- 
sitions, a, ab, de, e, kc; as, Abesse domo. To be away from home 



"i 



15G 



ArrEiTDix. 



^1 



III.-lNFINmVK MOOn, ETC. 

20. Iho infinitiva mood is a kind of verbal substantive, and is used M 
such, — 

(1.) As the tubject of a sentence ; as, Ilumanum est errare, It is natural 

to man to err, (— error.) 
(2.) As the object completing the imperfect ideas expressed by verbs 

such as to wish, to be Me, to be accustomed, to begin, cease; to 

teach, order, forbid; to hasten, &c : as, Cupio discere, I desire 

to learn, (= learning.) 

21. Observe that a purpose is not expressed in Latin by the infinitive, 
but by the subjunctive with a conjunction, ut, quo, &c.; as, Venit ut 
discat. He comes to learn, {i.e., for the purpose of learning.) 

22. The infinitive is often used in animated narrative aa an indicative. 
This is called the Historical Infinitive. 

PAUTICirLE. 

23. The participle is an adjective, and, like the adjective, agrees with its 
substantive in gender, number, and case ; as, Fuerum ludentem vtdi, I 
saw the boy playing. 

24. The perfect participle passive is, by an inversion of syntax, often 
equivalent to a substantive -. as, Aburbe condita. From the foundation of 
the city, {i.e., from the city being founded;) Post Atlunaa captas. After 
the capture of Athens. 

25. The future participle passive, or gerundive, implies that an action 
ought or must be done, or d( serves to be done. When the person is indicated, 
it is expressed in the dative ; as, Moriendum est omnibus. All must die. 

GERUND. 

26. The gerund is a regular noun, and its cases are treated accordingly ; 
as, Ars scribendi est utilis, The art of writing is useful ; Charta utUia 
scribendo, Paper useful for writing. 

SUPINES. * 

27. The supine in -um is used with verbs implying motion, to express 
the dengn of the motion ; as, Misit legatos rogatum auxaium, He sent 
ambassadors to ask help. 

28 The supine in -u is simply an ablative of limv tion, (see Art. 19, o, 
above :) as, Mirabile dictu, Wonderful to tell, {i.e., as to teUing ;) Lulce 
gustatu, Pleasant in (as to) taste. * 

29 Participles, gerunds, and supines govern tlie same case as their 
verbs: as, A mans virtutem, Loving virtue; Usus scrihendi epistolas, 
Th*- practice of writing letters ; Rogatum auxHium, To aek aid. 






NOTES ON THE EXTRACTS. 



FABLES OF PHAEDRUS. 



^^Z?^^ ff '^1 '^ ^^'^ application or "moral" of the Fable, had better ba 
omitted w the first mstance, and the substance of them imparted to the pupils bv 
the teacher, viva voce. They have therefore been enclosed in brackets In the text 



1. THE MULES AND THE ROBBERS 

Line 1. Ibant, "were journeying," imperf. indie, of eo, p. 82. 8 Sar- 
cints. See p. 154, 18 and 19, (1), (2). ■ 8 oar 

2. Unut, soil, mulua. See p. 35. § Ferebat. See p. 84. 

/ wf^w*?^®/' ^\h ^ Tumentet, from tumeng, pres. part, of tumeo. 
J<rl\ 5^?'^f o '^"'')- See p. 42. % Onere, m. of <mus. See 
p. 154, 18 and 19, (1), (2). § Cervke, from cervix. See p 165 (3) 

5. Clarum, "clear-sounding." § CoUo. See p. 154, 18 and 19, (1) (2) 

6. Comes, ''fellow-traveller;'' but «oa«a, a "partner," as in business! 
fe iiequitur, from sequor, declined like loquor, p. 74. § (Jradu. See 
p. 155, (3). 

8. Inter, "during," "in the midst of." 

10. Spoliatus, scil. mulus, "the plundered mule." 

11. iTiquit. See p. 96, 4. 

12. Amm, perf. indie, act. of amUto, § Laaius, perf. part, pass, of 
Utedo. § Vulnere, from vulnus. 

13. Hoc argummto, " by this fable," " analogy,' " iUustration." 
§ Hominum tmuitas, literally, "the littleness of men:" i.e., "humble 
men," "men of low degree." 



2. THE FROGS ASKING A KING. 

LiNB 1. For the ciraumsts^vces of Athens at the time to which this fable 
applies, see Dr. Schmitz's "Ancient History," p. 186 and p. 191 

i ;o^"?T'f*' °°"^- P^'"''- ^^ ■>'<^9ans, pres. part, of vayor. S^e pp. 72 
and 16. § Li^eris paludibus, "marshes of freedom," i.e., marshes where 
tliey enjoyed freedom ; as we say, "a free country." 

11. Pe«tcre contracted for ijcitverc, from pe<o. § Jove. See p. 34. 

12. Qwt See p. 44, 14. § Alores, from moa. § Ft. See p. 34. 

* • — »"-■ z -!-'c«tt, iuui !*y. 



twrijim 



108 



APPENDIX. 



16. //'yr, Mil. tigUlum. 

17. Una, soil. rana. So Ulae, Bcil, ranae, in line 19. 

21. Inquinassent, contracted for inquinavigterU. 

22. Roganta, plur. of rogans, pres. part, of rogo. % Mi»ere, perf. Indlc. 

of mitto. , 

23. ImUilia, scil. rex, "he was a useless kir<r. who had been given. 

24. Mitit, from mitto. § 2><n<c, from rfcn«. 

27. Mandata ad Javem, "a commission for Jupiter;" i.e., to prefer 
their request to Jupiter. 
80. Ait. See p. 96, 3. § Majua, of next line, from major. 

I. THE JACKDAW AND THE PEACOCKS. 

Lim 4. Tumms, pres. part, of <wm«). 

6. Pavoni. See p. 153, 17, (2). . 

6. Seqtie: the conjunction -que, "and," never stands alone, but n 
always attached to another word. § Contemnens, pres. part, of contemno. 
§ Suos, soil, amicot, " his own friends," or " kind." 

7. Oregi, from prea;, is the dat. depending, along with ae, on immiacuit. 
Seep. 151, 6, and 153, 17, (1). So also avi, in the next line, depends, 
along with pennat, on cripiunt. ^^ 

11. Triatem, &c., " sustained (or suffered) a sad raark-of-disgrace. 
12! Quidam: supply dixit, "said." § Deapexerat, from despich. 

13. Contentua, perf. part, of contineo. 

14. Pa<», pres. inf. of patior. 

15. iVec, " neither." § Expertus, from arpmor ; " Neither would yon 

have experienced (as you have done) nor would you in your distress 

be Tiow feeling,'*— literally, "your calamity," or distress. See line 13, 
Fable 1, (with note,) where tenuitaa hominum is used for tenuea hominea. 

4. THE WOLF AND THE LAMB. 
LinB 1. Eundem, from idem, p. 43. § Venerant. See p. 150, 2, 

2.' SUi. See p. 19, note *, 1. § Stabat, from atd. % Superior, "higher 
up" the stream. So inferior, in next line, " further down." 

8. /mprMa, literally, "not upright;" hence, " seeking more than one a 
own;'* and hence, "greedy," as here. 

4. IntuUt, from infero. 

6. Laniger, "the wool-bearer;" i.e., the lamb. § Contra, said m 

reply." 

7. The order is, Quaeso (I pray), Lupe, qui (how) poaatim facere quod 

querent f 

9. Viribua, abl. plur. of via. See p. 34. 

10. Ante hosaex mmses, i.e., " six months ago." § Male is separated 
from dixisti : it may be in one word, maledixisti, from maledico. 

18. Correptum lacerat, "tears him when seized;" i.«,, " seises and tears 
him." 



NOTES ON THE RXTRACT8. 



159 



«. THE DOO AND THE PIECE OF FLESH. 

LiWR 2. Per, "over," "across." § Carnem, from caro. 
8. In »peaUo, &c., "in the mirror of the water." 
4. Aliam. See p. 35, 8. 

6. Avidita, "his greedinesHi" i.e.. "the greeily dog :" at in 3. 16 tua 
culamttat: and tenuitat, in 1, 13. » ^ » »• *», io, iwfl 

7. Potuit, from posaum. See p. 80. 

e. THE COW. THE SHE-GOAT, THE SHEEP, AND THE LION. 

LlNTi 3. Pa^terw truuna«, "endurant of wrong," "patient under injus- 
tice. PcUteru, pres. part, of potior. 
4. Socii. See note 6, Fab. 1. 

6. Locutua cat, perf. indie, otloquor, 

7. Primam, soil, partem, "the first share." 

9 Terita, "the third (part) will follow me;" i.e., will be assigned me. 

10 5t 9M«, (see p. 44, 12, ast part of paragraph,) " whoever shall have 
touched the fourth, will be visited with evil." § Tetigerit, from tango 

11. Here again tmprobitaa, an abstract subst., is used, where we should 
expect tmprobua, a concrete. Insttad of " the greedy lion " we have " his 
greediness." § Sola, " alone," is used as equal to " for himself, " or " for 
itselx. 

7. THE FROGS AND THE SUN. 

Line 1. Cdebrea, "crowded;" i.e., with visitors 

8. Uxoremducere, "to marry;" i.e., to lead a bride to her new home. 
§ Qwndam, " once upon a time." 

L SmtvXere,ivomtoUo % Sidera, ivom aidua. So of anything high or 
loud we say, "It reached the stars." » «•«« or 

6. Convido here means "the tumultuous noise of voices." 

9. Crearit, contracted for creaverit, from creo. 



8. THE ASS AND THE LION HUNTINO. 

Line 3 Comite: at first sight, we might expect socio here: but the ass 
was hardly a aociua m the chase, since he took no part in the actual 

4. Contexit, from contego. § Frutice, froji frutex; equal to fruticeto 

6. bupply ut before exciperet. § Ipse refers to the lion. 

7. Viribus, abl. plur. of vis. See p. 34. 

9 Quae is equal to et eae: translate, " And when {dum) they seek " 

wearied"* " ^'^"^ *'' *' ""' *'*"'^**^' "^"'^ ^^^'^ (postquam) he was 

12. Prmcre rocm. " to still his voice;" i.e., to cease brayine. fi Insc 
tciis, lii a conceited way. " - - - 



160 



APPENDIX. 



8. THE 8TA0 AT THE FOUNTAIN. 

Link 8. Reatitit, from resisto. 

6. Crurum, from crus. 

7. Venantum, gen. plur. of pres. part, of venor. 
9. Elnait, from eludo. 

14. The order of the words is, Qaam utilia (ea) fwrivt mihi, quai 
lespcxeram: et quantum luctua (ea) haMierint, quae lauddram. 

10. THE FOX AND THE CROW. 

LiNH 4. Comem, inf. of comedo. § Ccha arborc, "on the top of <i 
tree;" literally, "a high tree," 

6. Qui is equal to qualii, " how great ! " " how remarkable t" 

8. Nidla ales, " no winged creature." 

12. Stupor corvi, " the stupidity of the crow;" i.e., "the stupid crow," 

11. THE ASS AND THE OLD MAN. 

LiNB 6. Suadebat asino. See p. 154, {a), (3). § Ne is equal to tit nan. 

7. Ilk, i.e., the ass. § Lcntus, "at liia ease," "taking it easy." 
§ Binas, "two pair (one) at each side." He had one pair already. 

9. RefeH. See p. 98, 9, (1), with note. 

10. Cui depends on serviam, " whom I serve." See p. 164, (a), (2). 

12. THE UNGRATEFUL DOG. 

Line 3. Parturiena, from parturio. Verbs ending in -urio signify the 
desire to do what the verb indicates. So eaurio, "to desire to eat;*' i.e., 
"to be hungry." They are called Desidbrative Verbi. 

6. Repoacenti, "to her demanding back." 

8. Hoc, soil, tempore, "this time." 

9. Mihi and turbae depend on par. See p. 154, (6), (3). 

10. 'Loco. See p. 155, (12.) (a). 

13. THE DOGS AND THE HIDE. 

Line 4. Comeaae. See comedo in Vocab. 

8. Friua is to be joined to quam of next line, "before that," "ere." 



14. THE AGED LION, THE BOAR, THE BULL, AND THE ASS. 

Link 3. Annis depends on defectua. See p. 154, 19, (1), (2). § Virihus. 
See p. 155, (4). Vinhua, from via. 
4. Trahens, "dragging out;" i.e., drawing with difficulty. 
6. Veterem, from vetus. 

8. Hoati/e corpua, " the body of his enemy." 

9. Caicious. See caix. § ixtudit, from extundo. 



NOTES ON THE EXTRACTS. 



161 



10. Iniigne tuli, " I have taken it ill (or amiss)." 

11. Mthi depends on insultare. See p. 154, (a) (2) 

12. The order is, C'erte videor mori bis, quod cog'or ferre te dederm 
naturae (a disgrace to nature). ' "'^'^ 



quai 



p of 1 



crow. 



utnon. 
easy." 



(2). 



nify the 



16. THE WEASEL AND THE MAN. 
LiNB 1. Begin with quum, whicn, nronerlv 8npaUin<r n,,„i,* * • l 
duce the clause. § //on^.V. depends ^n^aft'^LTSfii) ' ' " 

^. ATtAt depends on parce. See p. 154, (o), (1) 

p. 156 (45*an "(7).'*" ''*" ^'^^' ''' P' ^^^^ 17, (2); and on m«n6... 

6. (?ra/wm emt, " it would be a favour." 8 Suvvlici. " to vn,. * ». 
pliant;" i.e., " you entreating me." ^ '^WPCtet; to you a sui^ 

6. -R€^i?Mm depends on /r«am. See p. 165 (c) 

ml; aZnl" 't/«'r- "' ''^''- l^^^ ^^ «"PP'^ «*' " -"d that you 
may devour. § Ipsos, i.e., mum, " the mice themselves " 

thL^fl^Sr-' ;^!"."^J"°«t- impute;" t.«., "don't for a moment 
think of imputing. This is a very strong way of expressing a command 

-puttdeS/' ''^''''"''' "*'' ''^'°"^^* "^^^^•" §^"^^"'X 

IC. THE FAITHFUL DOG. 

Link 4. The order is, Tentans an posset capi cibo objecto. 

6. Ac, equal to ut mm : tranalate, "So that I may not bark for (in de- 
fence of) my master's property." ^ '®^ 

7. /8<a, " that of yours." See p. 43, 6. 

17. THE FROG AND THE OX. 
viit [''^'^'^- ^'^ '''''P^ ^ Vo«*t.. § B<yvem. See p. 33, sect. 

7 oZZT/l'"^'^ ^°'" *■•"•' *^^' ^^^ ^« "°t broader than the ox. 

7. (^uaesivit, from quaero. " 

8. Bovenk, soil. ea«c majorem, .'^ 

9. Tttft. See p. 90. ^ 



f: 



ere. 

s. 



18. THE DOG AND THE CROCODILE 

Lines. Currentes bibere, "drink as they run;" ie while niTii.Jna 
The order is, Traditumest (it is reported) cLs bibcretlJ^Z ^ '' 
7. ^o/trerm. See Fab. 16, note 8. § Me, bcU. dixit, 
o. Carnta. See caro. 



Link 6. Posuisse, "set before her, 

6. Esuriens. See Fab. 12, note 3, 

7. Vitoo depends on plenum. See p 



19. THE FOX AND THE STORK, 
"served up." 



022) 



II 



165, (4). 



-1 



^B*°" 



162 



APPENDIX. 



11. Pereffrinam voJuerem, "the foreign bird." The stork is a Hrd of 
passage, migrating from a cold to a warm climate in winter, and vice versa. 

12. The meaning is, Every person ought to submit contentedly to that 
treatment of which he himself sets the example. 

20. THE FOX AND THE EAGLE. 

LiNB 4. Nido, "in her nest;" pullis, " for her young," 

6. Mater, i.e., vulpes. 

7. Contempsit, from contemno. § Quippe, &c., "as being safe by the 
very {ipse) position;" i.e., by being high on the tree. 

10. Miscens, kc, literally, " mixing sorrow to her enemy with the loss 
of her blood" {i.e., her young); "causing sorrow to her enemy, and, at 
the same time, the loss of her young" — at least, the threatened loss. 

12. Supplex, " as a auppliaut," becoming a suppliant in her turn. 

21. THE MAN AND HIS TWO LOVERa 

Line 3. Xon rudis, " not uncomely," "not without accomplishments," 
(or attractions). 

4. Tenebat, "held e.r .laved," "possessed the affection of." ^ Ele- 
gantia means "the graces of the toilette." 

5. Observe that juvenis is fem., "a young woman," § Ceperat, ka., 
" had captivated the affections," 

7. ^omint depends, in the dat,, on legere: "they began to pluck out 
his hairs, for him." See p. 153, (2). 

8, Fingi, "to be trimmed." 

10. Canos, "the gray hairs;" nigros, "the black ones.'' 



22, THE EAGLE, THE CAT, AND THE BOAR. 

Line 1. Suhlimi quercu, " in the top of an oak," 
2. Pepererat, from pario. § In w.edia, soil, quercu, " in the middle of 
the oak." 
^. Ad imam, scil. quercum, " at the base of the oak." 

5. Sic, " in the following manner." 

6. Scandit, "she (the cat) climbs," § Volucris, i.e., the eagle. 

7. Tihi and mihi depend on paratur. See p, 153, 17, (2). § Forsan, 
&c,, "perhaps to me, too, wretched one" (that I am). 

8. Qwod "in that," "inasmuch as." 

11, Terrore, kc, refers to the eagle, which was alarmed. 

12, Derepit, "she (the cat) creeps down." 

14. Exieris, from exeo, § Simul, "as soon as." § Pastum, supine of 
pasoo. 

15. On tihi in the dat,, see Fab. 21, note 7. 
18. Suspcnso pcde, "on tiptoe," 

22. Rapinam, " the carrying off her young," 

23. Quid mulla, "why should I say many things;" i.e., "to make a 
long atory short." § Snis, "their own,'' viz., young ones. 



NOTES ON THE EXTRACTS. 



163 



23. THE STAG AND THE OXEN. 
LiNH S. Petit is contracted for petiit. 
^.Sjupply aia:U after los. § Latenti, "to hi™ (the stag) concealing 

ceeds tl ty"'" "' "^^^ ""'^ ^^^^"^ ^«^-^ '^i-* ; -•. night suc- 
18. Arrange thus, Sed si Uk ven^rit, kc. 
^V. Inter haec, "during this conversaHon •" ;« fi,« 
21. Corr^tos, << deteriLtingV^^'SriW l^e^r '' ■"^• 
ofi' /. ? ""'? '^^°"'' '^ ^* *« take away these sSs' weh«, 7" 

of Iv^^''" - ^- -. in its original an'd propert^ej^'household 

24. THE PANTHER AND THE SHEPHERDS. 

Ltne 5. Quippe veriturae, " ^s being about to neriah " p.«v 
pends on miserifi. See p. 153, (5) '^^ "" ^enturac de- 

15 ^S!?' ^T '"^"^"'"■' ' § ^'""«"»- See p. 152, 13 
15. Sih depends on timentes, " fearing for themselves-" ,• . r .u • 
safety. See p. 153. 17 (2) 8 /?w„. i\ 'f^^'^^'ves, t.c, for their 
See p. 154, (a) JV.k ^' ^ "'' '^^*" ^^P^^^ing on peperceraui. 

25. AESOP AND THE FORWARD FELLOW 

(Aesop). § .i« 1; J w^requal t:t L?™o" '.'J'" ^V*^' ^-^^^ ^^' 
our money. ^^ *° ^^^^^^^ """"e than a halfpenny of 

4. Prosecutua sic, "adding as follows." 

26. THE FLY AND THE MULE. 

5'"JlL^<ftCr'V^''' V'''' ^"*'" "*-ke care." 
o. /stum^ tuat (neighbour) of yours" 



27. THE DOG AND THE WOLF. 
4. Picstiterunt, from mw^o, "to stop " 

8. «Mrf, scil. <#„„,„, "wbatdntjt" 
J0^« ,3 placad far on fa the clause,. It eouple, the verb, H, a.,1 

il. Ifives, from nix. 



164 



APPENDIX. 



12. Trahens, pres. part, of traho, "dragging out." 

16. A catena. This is an irregularity. The preposition is generally 
expressed only before the names of persons. 

17. Unde hoc, " whence comes this ? " " how is this ? " 

20. Qua visum est, " wherever I please;" literally, " wherever it baa 
seemed good to me." 

21. UUro, "spontaneously;" i.e., without my seeking it, 

26. St est animiis, " if you wish," " if you have-a-mind to go away." 



28. THE BROTHER AND SISTER. 

Like 2. Turpissimam, "very plain-looking." 
6. Inspexcrant, from inspicio. 

8. Accipiens quippe, kc, "taking, forsooth, everything as an insult." 

9. Laesura, " with the intention of injuring him." 

11. "Because, though by birth a man, he approached the nature of 
women." 

12. On the gender of ucrumque, see p. 160, 1, obs. 2. 

14. Specuio depends on uti. See p. 155, (c), 

15. Mails, abl. plur. n. of malus, -a, -urn, " by the evil practices." 

16. Vincas, " may get the better of." 

29. THE BEES AND THE DRONES. 

Line 2. Hos, " these (combs) the lazy drones alleged to be theirs." 

3, Forum, i.e., the law-courts, 

4. Quae : resolve quae into et ea, and arrange thus : Et quum ea (vespa) 
nosset (novisset) utnimque pulcherrime, " And since she knew both kinds 
{i.e., the nature of the bee and of the drone) most thoroughly, she laid 
down the following terms to the two parties" — (at the bar), 

8. Religio mea, "my oath;" i.e., lest I, who am bound by a sacred 
obligation to act honestly, should err through want of knowledge (im- 
prudens). 

11. Auctor ho-^um de quis (i.e,, quibus), "the maker of these things 
concerning which the dispute now is." 

14. Apertum est, " it is plain who is not able (to make them), and who 
has made them." 




30, AESOP AMUSING HIMSELF, 

Line 2. The introductory word quum is thrown far forward into the 
clause ; arrange thus: Quum quidam Atticus vidisset Aesopum ludcntem 
nucibus in turba puerorum. 

3, Resolve quod into et hoc, and arrange: Et simul (as soon as) sene.T, 
devisor potiits quam deridendus, sensit hoc. 

6. Sapiens, " philosopher !"—.<?aid in irony, § Expedi, "explain what 
I have done." 



NOTES ON THE EXTRACTS. 



166 



7. Torqutt se, "tortures himself-" "rar^Uo i;= v • .» 
"puzzles himself." "^^seii, racks his brain," as we «aj; 

8. Noviasime sticcumbit, "at Ia<»f },o „.v«„ • » . 

§^At«, viz., Aesop. ^ ^'""'^ '"' »•«•' fii^es it up. 

31. THE TREES AND THEIR GUARDIAN DEITIsa 
which"theytirh7d!" &r'"''' '"'"""*'' ^°'^ "^'^ ^^^-« ^^ *^« trees 
W^^ftL^il^h^^^^^ § ^«, viz., t^e 

Btater rr^4?:Veri*!^^"y' "what each one may have wished he will 
Pleas;,"^^;ay tLty7u"L"^^ "'^'^'^^'^ -^ - t^^e^ 

11. 2>ic,re, second sing. fut. indie, pass, of dico, " thou wilt be caUed." 

82. THi. PEACOCK AND JUNO 

^itZ nigS&fc"o5^t^| J.^ ^"^^^ *^^^ ^^^ ^^'^ - ^- t. 
3. 7«t,^ " (sayixig that) he," viz./the nightingale. 

JcA li- ' TVe7c:rsit\^^^^^^^^ ^°- § ^^ ^« -. 

without any govermng vrbTprised'^ nV'"'^ *^"!- " '^^'^'''^^ ^^^"«^«' 
the appropriate word toTe supE ' "'''"''*^"'^ '^'^"^ ^"^-'^^^^ 

10. Fo6i„"toyou;"t...,toyoubirds. 

12. The raveu on the right hand was lucky, and the crow on the left. 

83. THE FOX AND THE GRAPES 
W 1. /„ o^to ri«m, "on the top of a vine." 
potuii tanJreTanc. ^ "" *^'*'^ "'° '' '*""'^' ^^^ --^"g«. ^^ «^ rum 

34. THE HORSE AND THE BOAR 

J: 2: °"^' "' ■^"'^'""' 'S" »'"•/«* *«-« '*/«,«. § Locals, 
9. a«si<, from «y„. § invUm,, sAcquum. 

35. THE BATTLE OF THE MICE AKD WEASELS. 

4. Evaacrunt, from cracio. 

6. Ligdrant contracted for ligaverant. 

7. Z^oiercnt has as its subject m7t7a. 

111 1> -?"•'?" '!UC7Cf.-. 

lu. J/crjttf, from wicryo. 



166 



APPENDIX. 



36. THE VIPEK AND THE FILE. 

Line 4. Si qua. See 8i quis in Vocab. 

6. Mnmordit, from mordeo, 

7. Quae, " who," is subject to adsuevi, and relates to mc. 

87. THE FOX AND THE HE-GOAT. 

Line 3. Liscia, "unawares;" " before s^ knew what she was about/' 
as we say. 
4. AUiore, " too high" for her to leap up. 
11. Nina, from nitoi; " J-p uing on," *• resting on." 

88. MEN'S FAULT& 

Line 2. Propriis vitiis, " with our own vices." 8 JXeplciam, soil. 
peram, " the bag filled with," &c. 
3. Alienis, scil. vitiis. § Qravem, soil, pei im. 



I 



89. THE SHE-GOATS AND THE HE-GOATS. 

Line 2. Tndignari, " to feel (or to express) their indignation, 
serve that the e of coep^runt is made short here. 

3. Aequassent is contracted for aequavissent. 

4. Gloria. See p. 155, (c). 

5. Omatum, " the badge of your office," viz., the beard. 

6. Fortitudini. See p. 154, b, (3). 



§0b- 




40. THE MAN AND THE SNAKE. 

Line 2. Oelu is the " abl. of cause." 

3. Contra se, " to his own hurt." 

6. Improbis depends on prodesse. See p. 164, a, (1). 

<. 
41. THE ANT AND THE FLY. 

Line 2. Pluris, " of greater worth," See p. 153, (7). 

4, Ubiimmolatur, literally, "when it is sacrificed;" i.e., "when sac- 
rifice is offered." § Exia deum; i.e., " the entrails presented as an offer- 
ing to the gods." 

6. Quum visum est mihi, " when I think fit." 

9. Eorum depends on simile. See p. 153, (6). § Rustica, "thciii 
clod-hopper,"— said with great contempt. 

10. Convictus, &c., "fellowship with the gods is, in truth, a prnnd 
thing— but to him who is bidden, not to him who is foi'-bidden (bated)." 
Observe the intentional similarity in sound between invitatur and int ir.«. 
These jokes on words are very common in both Latin and Greek, but it 
is seldom possible to give exact equivaleuts in English. 



..■> 



NOTES ON THE EXTRACTS. 



167 



13. Commermras, &c., "yon talk of kings, aud ladies' lins " 
17. Stercore. See stei-cus in Vocab. ^ 

21. ^<Meit, from rc^MHcio ,■ literally, "I Lave bIuntP.1-" v^ "t i 
taken the point off your UDDislines/" " T i ,T' ''■' ^ ''^^"^ 
the head " "PPisnness, I Lave knocked your conceit oa 



42. TIME, 

Of iron L^^ bTJ T4f iiKistd'"' °r:.^ r ^' ^^'"' -*^ ^ *"^t 

indicates (syn^bolij) th^ b^f t^^^^tf;^^ '''' 
right moment to do things, and L .t it soon pasles ' " '^"' " " 

ti.ne),^S Sm'flst" uliSr '"^'r'^ ^"'^^^">' *^«« ^-« ««i^ed in 



168 



APPENDIX. 



GENDER OF NOUNS. 



NoiK.— The following Rules will guide the pupil to the principal classes of words and 
of terminations belonging to tlie different Genders. The more common Excep- 
tions are also given ; but the Ii. .its of tlie book forbid an exhaustive chapter on 
this subject. For more complete lists consult the Grammar belonging to this Series 



1; 



I. GENERAL RULES.-GENDER DECIDED BY THE MEANING. 

I. The uames of male beings are mascuHne : as, — 

TUtev, father; Vir, man; CblcbUt, Caeaar; Taurus, 6ii//. 

II. The names of rivers, winds, and months are masc. (fluvius, 
veutUB, and mensis being masc.) : as, — 

Tiberia, the Tiber; Aquilo, the north wind'; Aprilis, April 

Exc. — ^The following river- names are feminine : — 
AlliS, AIbul&, Matrona, Styx, and Lethe. 

III. The names of r^.&nj mountains are masc. (mons being maac.): 

as, — 

Othrys, Mount Othrys. 

But they generally follow the gender of the termination: as,— 

Atlas, masc; Ida, fern.; SSraote, neut. 

IV. The names of female beings are /em.; as, — 

Mater, mother; Soror, sister; MlillSr, woman. 

V. Most of the names of countries, islands, towns, trees, and precious 
Etones are/em.; as, — 

Aegyptfia, Egypt; Sal&mis, Salamis; Rhodus, Rhodes; 
TyruB, Tyre; Quercua, an oak tree; Smaragdus, an 
emerald. 

Exc. 1.— Names of countries endin? in -um,or -a {j>lv.r.) are neut.. 
as, — 

Latium, Latium; Bactr&, Bactra. 

Exc. 2. — Names of towns in -i, -drum, are Tnasc: aa,- 
Philipp-i, orum, PhUippi. 



GENDER OP NOUNS. 



1C9 



Jt«c. 3. — Those in -um, -e (afn {■ . nv »« j 
WiT.). are„e„<..M,_ " ' "•"• "'' •»■ -°"™ 

Tirentnm; Caer..,.i.j in,„; lUonj Leuctr-H, ^ram. 
Xxc. 4.-Several in ^ are mate.: a«,— 

Sulmo, Vewntio, Sarto, CrSto, PrBalno, and Hippo. 

Sllar, «, o,ier; Mp»„r, «„py,. ESbnr, «„ oak. 
«l.rrj° "' °' '" ''""°'' '''°'- "* "»- » -. are 

now, Errare, <o m- (i.e., error). 



11. SPECIAL RULES-GENDER DECIDED BY THE TERMINATION. 
FIRST DECLENSION. 
I. Nouns in -5 and -e are /em.; those in -as and -gs raasc: as - 

i^^c. l.-Names of nien, and their designations, are masc.: as.- 

^xc. 2.-Names of rivers in -a are masc: as,- 
SeqTia,n^^ the Seine. 
But see above. Rule II., with Exception, p. 168. 
£u:c. 3.-Hadria, the Adriatic Sea. is rruuic. 




170 



APPENDIX. 



SECOND OECti-NSION. 



II. Nouns ending in -Gs, -ht, and -xr are masc: m, — 

HortQii, a yarden; Ager, afield ; VIr, a man. 

Exc. 1. — Nanes of towns and of trees in -us nre ^joii. lall^ fem. (see 
above, Rule V., p. 168): as, — 

CSrinthus, Corinth / P6p&lus, a poptar tree. 

Exc. 2.— TLe following words, whicii cannot be classifi' d, are /em., 
vi«. : — 

Alvfis, the belly ; ColiiB, a distaff (rarely masc.); Humus, 
the ground; Vann&s, a corn fan. 

Exc. 8. — Greek words in -us, which retain their Greek fem. gen- 
der : as, — 

MSthddilB, a method ; Carb&Biis (in the sing.), fine flax. 

Exc. 4. — Three nouns in -ua arc ^^ew<., viz.: — 

VIriiB, poison; PSl&giis, the sea; and Vulgils (also maac), 
the common people. 

III. Nouns ending in -um are neut.: as,— 

Malum, an apple. 



THIRD DECLENSION. 
A. — Words Ending in a Vowel. 

IV. Nouns in -• -8, and -i are neut.: as, — 

Foema, a poem; MS.re, the sea; Slnapi, mustard. (There 
is also a fem. form, Sinapis.) 

V. Nouns ending in -o are masc: as, — 

Sermo, conversation ; Ordo, order; Cardo, a hinge; Margo, 
a margin; Fraedo, a robber ; LIgo, a spa' '\ 

Exc. 1. — Abstract uoims ending in -do and -io are /em.; also those 
in -go : as, — 

MagnltQdo, greatness; Ciipido, desire (also masc, as a 
proper name); Largitio, 6rt6ery ; Virgo, a maic2«n. So 
also, B&tio, reason; Oratio, speech; Leglo, a legion; 



n± — . ^ 



fbcgxO, u uiaii'-iOk ; viurC, 



^«s/i. 



GENDER OF NOUNS. 



171 



VI. NouiiB ending iu y are tieut..- ns,— 

Mlsy (i/cu. mIsyiB, or mlayoa), wf rto/. 

B.— Words Ending in a Coiiaonant. 

L 1IA8C0UNK TKRMINATIOII& 

VU. ER.-Nouns ending in -er are generally ma,c.: as,- 

Venter, the belli/; C&rcSr, a prhon. 

Exc. 1.— Many ii -er are neut. : as,— 

cadaver, « cor; se; Papaver. ^oj,jt,y; Vgr. ^nny; lt&:. u 
journey. ^ ' ^*' 

^a». a.-These are /em. (see Rule IV., p. 168):— 

Linter, a ' nt; MiiUer, a i^oman; Mater, a mother. 

yill. ES.-Noun8 in -es, which have a Bvllable more in the gen than 
ui the nom., yv.e., "increasing nouns/'^ are ma,c.: as,- 

Pea, ped-Is, afoot; Parils, pariStw, a woj;. 
Exc. —The following re /em. >— 

(CompeB), compediB, a /e«.r; Sggg,, sgggtis. a cro«. 
Merces, xnercedis, a r«...ci; Qme., qLti . andll 
quies requietifl. re«^. Inquige, inquietis, ^^lle^nll 
MergSs, mergxtis. « ,Aea/ o/ c.r»; Tggg;, teggTra 

IX. OR.— Nouns in -or are generally mtwc; as,— 
H6nor, ^o ,w; L&b6r, toi^. 

Exc. l.-Several .n -or, gm. ^ris, are nmt. ; as,- 

Ador (.5ris) ,j>cU; Aequor, U^ sea-plain; MannJr 
wari^<; Cor, the heart. -^^xrinor, 

-Eo^c. 2.— These are /em. by Rules V. and IV., p. 168:— 
Arbor, a tree; 8or6r, sister; Uxor, wu/«. 
X. OS.-Nouns in -os are generally masc: as,- 

Mos, £,cn. moria, cu -am. Flos, florla, a flmer. 
Exc. 1.— These are /cm..— 

Cos. ooiis, o z.Acf*<<,„e; and Dos, dotis. a u-wy. 



1 
11 



172 



APPENDIX. 



Exe. 2.— TheB« are ixeui.:— 

Oa, 5rii, the mouth; and Ol, oiiis, a bone. 

XI. ON.— Greek words in -on are mcuc, (but a few are /cm,.) aa,~ 
Babylon, Babyl9n-li. 



II. rmrNiMK tbruinatioms. 

XII. AS.— Nouna in -as are /em.; as,— 

Aet&8, aet&tii, age; CIvItas, a state. 

Exe. 1. — Some are maac: as, — 

Ad&m&fl, diamond; Aa, aaaii, an as (a Roman coin); 

£lSph&a, an elephant; Olg&s, a giant; Mas, maris, a 

male; Via, v&dia, a surety. 
)Lnaa, a duck, is common. 

Exc. 2.— The following are neut. (see Rule VL, p. 169):— 
y&a, y&aia, a vessel; Faa, and NSf&a. 

XIII. AUS.— Nouns in -aua are fern. They are,— 

Laua, laudia, j)mt»c; and Fraus, fraudis, deceit. 

XIY. ES.— Nouns in -ea, which do not increase, are /cm.; as,— 
CaedSa, caedia, slaughter; ClidSs, clidla, defeat. 

Exc. 1. — One word is common, viz.: — 
F&lnmbea, a wood-pigeon. 

Exc. 2.— The names of rivers in -ea are masc. by Rule II., 
p. 168 ; also,— 
Verres, o boar. 

XV. IS.— Nouns in -is are /cm.; as,— * 

Hav!a, a ship; Vallla, a valley; Cuspla, cuapldia, a 
point ; Lis, litis, a law-suit. 

Exc. 1.— Many are masc. ; as, — 

Amnia, a river; Axis, an axle; C&nMia, a canal; CoUia, 
ahiU; Crinis, hair ; "EnaU, a sword; TmcIb, a bundle ; 
Finia, an end, (also fern, in sing.;) Fiinia, a rope; 
Fustia, a club; Ignia, fire; L&pia, l&pidis, a stone; 
Menaia, a Tnonth; Orbia, a circle; Panis, bread; Piaoia, 
a fijsh; Pulvia, pulvSria, dust; PoatIs, a post; Sangula, 
sanguinis, blood; Sentia, a thorn; Ungoia, a nail. 
Also a few others of rare occurrence. 






OENDKR OP NOUNS. 



178 






Kxc. 2. — Some are eommon: m, — 

CknU, a doff; Angui8,a*na*<;; CorhU,ab<uket; Clflnla. 
a buttock. ^ 

XVI. X.— Nouns in -x are generally /m. ; a«,— 

Pax, picia, peace: Nex, n8cli, death; Eidix, ridlcii. a 
root; Nox, noctis, night; Lex, ISgii, a /aw; Vox, vflcu. 
a voice; Arx, arcis, a citadel. 

Ex/:. 1.— Most of those in -ex are maiw.,: as,— 
Grex, grgglB, a flock. 

Sxc. 2.-T}.e following, with a few others, are mase..-^ 

CaiU, a cvp; Fornix, an arch; Tridux, o vine-hranch. 

Urb8,aa7y; Hiem»,mn<«-; Daps, d&pi». a /««»<; Gens, 
a race; Mens, <Ae mmd; Frons, frontis, «Ac /orc/^eorf • 
Frons, frondis, a leaf; Glans, glandis, an acorn; Ars! 
artis, art, tkill. ' 

-Ej^c.-The following, with a few others, are mate..— 

Pons, pontis, a tnVif/e,; Fons, fontis, a /o«„<am ; Mons, 
mentis, a mountain; Dens, dentis, o tooth; Orieus 
oributii, the east ;T:QtTQn&, a torrent. 



IIL KEUTKR TBRHWATIONS. 

XVIII. C— Nouns ending in -c are neut.: as,— 

Lac, lactis, milk ; Alec, alecis, pickle. 

XIX. L.— Nouns ending in -1 are neut.: as,— 

Mgl, mellis, honey; Anim&l, an animal. 
iSrc— The following are masc.:~ 

Comiil a consul; Sol, the mn; Sal. sa7/ mgil, a mul- 
let; Piigil, a boxer. 

XX. N.— Nouns in -n are neut.: as,— 

Carmen, carminis, a poem. 

JJlrc. —These are maac..-— 

Pectgnpectinis, a c«m6; Egn, renis, the kidne-,; Splen. 
solenla, /*/> .»«7^^« . ms . . . " "H'ch, 

^'a//fr; Comlcen. a hom-blower, &c 



174 



APPENDIX. 



XXI. AR.— Nouns in -ar are 7jeu<.; as,— 

Calcar, o spur, 
E'C. — One word is majw., viz.: — 

L5r, a koutdwld god. 
XXII UR,— Nouns in -ur are ncut. : as,— 

Fulgiir, lightning; Robiir, roboris, strength. 

Exc. — The following are masc.:— 

rar, faris, a thief; Vultftr, a intUure; Astiir, n hawk; 
Turtur, a turtle-dove; and Furfur, bran. 

XXIII. US.— Nouns in -us are ?ic«<.; as,— 

Vulniis, vulneris, a wound; Corpus, corporis, a body; 
Jus, juris, law. 
Exc. 1. — Two are masc: — 

Ippiis, leporis, a hare; and Mfls, muris, a mouse. 

Exc. 2. — These are com/mon : — 

Siis, a fig; and Grus, a crane. 

Exc. 3.— The following are /cm..- — 

Incus, incHdis, an anvil; Jiiventas, juventutis, youth; 
Palus, paludis, a marsh; Peciis, peciidis, cattle; Salua, 
ealutis, safety; Sgnecttis, senectutis, old age; Servitas, 
bondage; Tellus, telluris, the earth; and Virtus, 
virtiitis, virtue. 

XXIV. T. — Nouns in -t are neut.: as, — 

Capiit, capitis, the head. 



m 



FOURTH DECLENSION. 

XXV. US.— Nouns in -us are masc; as,— 

Fructiis, fruit ; Gradus, a step. 

Exc. — The following are /cm..— 

Aciis, a needle; Auiis, an old woman; DSmiis, a house; 
Idiis (pL), the ides of a month; M&nus, the hand; 
Porticiis, a porch; Tribiis, a tribe; and (by Rule IV., 
p. IGS), Niirus, a daughter-in-law; and SoovTiB, a mother- 
in-law. 

XXVI. U. — Nouns in -u are nc»'<.; as,— 

Gelii. fraai; Cornu, a fiom. 



RULES OP syntax:. 



175 



FIFTH DECLENSION. 

XXVTI. ES.— iVouns !n -fia &refcm.: a8,~ 
Bes, a matter. 

£xc.—The following are excepted, viz.:— . 

Dies (8ing.), m. or/.; Dies (plur.), m.; Merldifig, mid- 
day, masc. 



RULES OF SYNTAX. 



/ 



I. An adjective agrees with its own substantive in gender, number 
and case : as, — ' 

FabuUe longae, (pi.,) Ior>g stories; Amicus fidus, (masc.,) 
a faithful/r lend ; AmicoaMoa, (l^\.,)Jhithful/rienda. ' 

II. The prepositions in, cum, a or ah. e or ex, govern the ablative- 
as,— 

In silva, in the forest; Cum ancilla, aloriff with the maid- 
servant, 

III. A verb agrees with its subject in number and person : as,~ 

Aquila est, the eagle is; Aquilae sunt, the eagles are. 

TV. One substantive govcrna, in the genitive, another signifying a dif- 
ferent thing : as, — 

Penna aquilae, the eagle's feather. 

V. The preponitions ad and in {into) govern the accusative: as.— 

Ad portam, towards the gate; In urbem, into the city. 

VI. The conjunctions et, ac, atque, connect words and clauses co-ordi- 
natively: as, — 

Piter et mater, father and mother: pater meus est bonus, 
et mater tua est pulchra; my father is good, and your 
mother is beautiful. 

m. Since two singulars are equal to a plural, two sinj^nuar subjects 



176 



APPENDIX. 




connected by a co-ordinative conjunction (et, ac, atque, ^ne, &c.) bave 
a verb or adjective in the plural : as,— 

Pater et filiua sunt clari, the father and the son are 
famous. 

VIII. Transitive verbs govern the accusative : as,— 

Aediflcat murum, he builds a wall. 
IX„ The word that expresses the instrument by which something h 
done, is put in the ablative : as,— 

Necat ense, he kiUs with a sword. 

X. The word indicating the point of time at which anything occuni ia 
put in the ablative : as,— 

Venit postero die, he came the next day. 

XI. Verbs and adjectives which signify advantage or disadvantage, 
likeness or uulikeness, are followed by a dative : as,- 

Inimicus malia. hostUe to the wicked; SimiliB patri, like 
his father. 

XII. The comparative degree governs the ablative of the object with 
which comparison is instituted : as,— 

Dulcior melle, sweeter than honey; Filia pulchrior matre, 
« daughter more beautiful than her mother. 

XIII. The relative, qui, quae, ^iUOd, agrees with its antecedent in gen- 
der, number, and person ; as, — 

Miles, quem laudas, est fortis; the soldier, whom, you 
praise, is brave: Mulieres, quas vides, gracUes sunt; 
the women, xohom you see, are slender: Carmma, quae 
canto, sunt nova; the songs, which I sing, are new. 

XIV. Verbs of giving, declaring, and taking away, govern the dative 
with the accusative : as,— 

Poeta dftt carmina reginae, the poet gives verses to the 
queen; Tuer rem omnem patri indicavit, the hoy de- 
clared the whole matter to his father. 

XV. The word expressing the agent is, after passive verbs, usualiy put 
in the ablative with a or ab ; as,— 

Pueri laudantur a magistro, the hoys are praised by tfu 
maiter. 



RULES OF SYNTAX. 



177 



XVr. Substantives which stand in apposition to one anotiier agree ia 
Romam, urbem Italiae ; Rome, a city of Italy. 
of fpic"; ^1"°°"^^^^^° '^ -^'^ '- ^^Prcss duration of ti,nc and extension 

Dormiunt totam hiemem, they sleep the whole winter- 
Cives murum sexaginta pedes altum exstruxerunt, the 
citizens built a wall sixty feet high. 

XVIII. The ve>bs utor, abator, fruor, fungor. potior, vescor &c 
usually govern the ablative: as,- • i'""or, vescor, &c., 

Utebantur aere, they used brass; Fungitur officiis, he 
performs his duties. 

XIX. When motion towards is expressed, the names of towns and 
Kslands are put in the accusative, without a pr;position : as.-- 

Eomam accessit, he approached Rome; Reversus est 
Jinoaum, he returned to Rhodes. 

XX. Verbs signifying to persuade, command, serve resist ,««r. 
heheve, envy, &c., are followed by a dative: as,- ' ^ ' 

Persuadet amico, he prevails on his friend; Servit irae, 
nets a slave to passion. ' 

XXI. The infinite mood usually depends on another verb: as.- 

Cupio discere, / am eager to learn. 

ative"^";,- ' "''°'* '" " '''' '" *'' '"'^"^^^^ ""^'^ >•« 1-t - the accus- 

Hostes parare beUum videt, he sees that the enemy are 
preparing (for) war. ^ 

^XXm. The compounds of «xm, except possum, govern tl,e dative: 
Interfuit praeUo, he was present at the battle. 
XXIV. An impersonal verb governs the dative : as,- 

Expedit reipublicae, it is profitable for the sfat^. 



•7*41 



(122) 



12 



178 



APPENDIX. 



■iv 



CONJUGATION* OF VERBS 

MORE OR LESS IRREGULAR IN THE PERFECT AND SUPINE. 



I. THE FIRST CONJUGATION. 
The regular forms are -avi and -atu 

crepltum, 

cubitum, 

d&tum, 

domltum, 

jutum, 

<lautum, awdllavare, 

vlotum, -' 

micare, 

praestlti, praestitum, praestare 

sectum, s6care, 

sonitum, Bonare, 

statum, stare, 

tonitum, tonare, 

vetitum, vetare, 



am-ar8, 


to love. 


Crepo, 


crepui, 


Cfibo, 


cubui, 


Do, 


dSdi, 


Domo, 


ddmui. 


Jiivo, 


jUvi, 


L&vo, 


l&vi, 


i MIco, 


mtcui, 


Praesto, 


praestt 


Seco, 


secui, 


Sono, 


sonui. 


Sto, 


stSti, 


Tono, 


tonui. 


Vgto, 


vetui, 



like Amo. 


am 


i-5vi, &m&t-TiTni 


crepare, 




to creak. 


cubare, 




to lie. 


d&re, 




to give. 


dSmare, 




to tame. 


juv&re, 




to assist. 



to wash. 

to glitter, 
to perform, 
to cut. 
to tfmnd. 
to stand, 
to thunder. 
to forbid. 



II. THE SECOND CONJUGATION. 

The regular forms are -evi and -etum: as,-Fleo, flevi, fletum, flere 
to weep. Verbs of this formation are few. The following (one of wuich 
has -itum) are the most common :— 

1. Perfect in -evi; Supine in -etum 

to aholish. 
( to blot out, de- 
\ stray, 
to weep. 
nevi, netum, nere, 

complevi, completum, complete, 



Aboleo, 
Deleo, 



Fleo, 
Neo, 
Complco, 



abolevi. abolitum, abolere, 
delSvi, deletum, de.'ere 

flevi, fletum, flere, 



to spi^i. 
to, fill up. 



A fuller list is given in the Grammar bek nginst to this Series p. 250. 



i 



rRREGULAR VKRBS, 
2. Perfeei in -ui ; Supine in -turn. 



Censeo, 
DSceo, 



censni, 
docui, 



Misceo, miacui, 



TSneo, 
Torreo, 



Prandeo, 
Sedeo, 
Strldeo, 
Video, 



tSnai, 
torrui, 



censum, 
doctuin, 
( mixtum, 
\ mistum, 
tentum, 
tostum, 



censere, 
docere, 

>■ miscere, 

tln^re, 
torrere, 



3, Perfect in-iidi); Swpine in -mm. 

prandi, pransum, prandere, 

sedi, sessum, aedere, 

atridi, atridere, 

vidi, visum, videre, 



179 



to value, think, 
to teach. 

to mix. 

to hold. 
to roast. 



to breakfast 
to sit. 

to creak, whistle 
to see. 



Mordeo, 
Fendeo, 
Spondeo, 
Tondeo, 



CSveo, 
Faveo, 
Foveo, 
Moveo, 
Voveo, 



The four following reduplicate* in the Perfect Tenses:— 



momordi, morsum, 

pependi, (pensum,) 

spopondi, sponsum, 

totondi, tonsum, 



mordere, 
pendere, 
spondere, 
tondere, 



4. Pe'^'fect in -i (vi); Supine in -turn. 



cavi, 

favi, 

fovi, 

movi, 

vovi, 



cautum, 

fautum, 

fdtam, 

motum, 

votum, 



cavere, 

favere, 

lovere, 

mSvere, 

vovSre, 



to bite. 
to hang, 
to promise, 
to shew. 



to take care, 
to favour, 
to cherish, 
to move, 
to vow. 



Conniveo, { 



' connivi, 
. connizl, 

Ferveo, \^''^\ 
I ferbui, 



^0 Supine. 
J ■ connivere. 



to wink. 



) 



/ 



Paveo, pavi, 



Ardeo, 
Augeo, 
Fulgeo, 



fervere, 
pavere, 

5. Perfect .n ii; Supine in -ti.m and -sura. 
arsi, 



to boil, 
to fear. 



fuUi, 



araum, 
auctum, 



ardere, 
augere, 
fulgere, 



to blaze, 
to increase. 
tc 



.l,o^t^.:.'l\"!':S:'^'l!'";?;T- '"».,« perfect «,„. denvJte,,.. 



.x^__. 



I 



m\ 



180 




APPENDIX. 




Haereo, 


haesi, 


haesum, 


haerere, 


to stick. 


Indulge©, 


indulsi, 


indultum, 


indulgere. 


to induhje. 


Jiibeo, 


jussi, 


juBsum, 


jubere, 


to order. 


Luceo, 


laxi, 





lucere, 


to shine. 


Lugeo, 


luxi, 




lugere, 


to grieve. 


Maneo, 


mansi, 


mensum, 


manere, 


to remain 


Mulceo, 


mulsi, 


mulsum, 


mulcere, 


to stroke. 


Mulgeo, 


molsi, 


fmulsum, or 
tmulctum. 


>■ mulgere. 


to milk. 


Rideo, 


risi, 


risum, 


ridere, 


to laugh. 


Suadeo, 


suasi, 


saasum, 


Buadere, 


to advise. 


Torqueo, 


torsi, 


tortum, 


torquere, 


to twist. 


Urgeo, 


ursi, 




urgere, 


to press. 



Audeo, 

Gaudeo, 

Soleo, 



6. Semi- Deponents. 

ausus sum, audere, 

gavisus sum, ■ gaudere, 

Bolitus sum, ■ Bolere, 



to venture, 
to rejoice, 
to be wont. 



III. THE THIRD CONJUGATION. 

The regular forms are -i, -tum, or -si, -turn: as,— Scribo. scrips-i, 
script-um, scrib-ere, to write. 

A.— Labial Stems. 

1. Perfect in -si; Supine in -tnm. 

Note. ~B is changed into p before s and t. 



Carpo, 


carpsi, 


carptum, 


carpere, 


to pluck. 


Nubc, 


nupsi, 


nuptum, 


nubere, 


to marry 


Repo, 


repsi. 


reptum, 


vepere, 


to creep. 


Scribo, 


scripsi, 


scriptum, 


scribere, 


to write. 


Serpo, 


serpsi, 


serptum, 


serpere, 


to crawl. 



2. Perfect in -ni; Supine in -tum or -itum. 
rCumbo, 
1 1ncumbo. incubui, incubitum. incumbSre, to lie upon. 

Btrepere, to make a noise. 



Btrepo, 



strSpui, strepitum. 



IBREGtTLAR VERBS. 



181 



3. Perfect in ~i\ Swpine in -ivim, <yr wanting. 

8J^o> tlbi, (bibitum,) 

Lambo, Iambi, , 

Enmpo, rupi, ruptum, 



bibere, 

lambere, 

rumpere, 



to drink, 
to lick, 
to burst. 



B.— QuTTUBAL Stems. 

1. Perfect in -si ; Supine in -turn. 

NOTE.-G. and gt form x. Is changed into c before L 



Affligo,* 

Cingo, 

Coquo, 

Dico, 

Buco, 



afflizi, 

cinzi, 

cozi, 

dizi, 

duzi. 



Ezstinguo, ezstinzi, 
Pingo, finxi, 



affictum, 

cinctum, 

coctum, 

dictum, 

ductum, 



affllgere, 

cingere, 

coquere, 

dicere, 

aiicere, 



to strike down, 
to surround, 
to cook, 
to say. 
to lead. 



ezBtinctum, ezstinguere, to extinguish. 



Jungo, 

Pingo, 

Rego, 

Stringo, 

Tego, 

Tingo, 

Tinguo 

Traho, 

Uugo, 

Unguq 

Veho, 



Figo, 

Flecto, 

Mergo, 

Necto, 

Pecto, 

Plecto, 

Spargo, 

I'ergo, 



junzi, 

pinzi, 

rezi, 

strinzi, 

tezi, 

J-tinzi, 
trazi, 

^unzi, 
vezi, 



fictum, 

junctum, 

pictum, 

rectum, 

Btrictum, 

tectum, 

tinctum, 

tractum, 

unctum, 

vectum. 



fingere, 
jungere, 
pingere, 
regere, 
stringere, 
tegere, 
j'tingere, 
I linguere, 

trahere, 
fungere, 
1 unguere, 
vehere, 



to invent, 
to join, 
to paint, 
to direct, rule. 
to grasp, 
to cover. 

> to dip. 

to drag, 
yto anoint. 

to carry. 



2. Perfect in -si ; Supine in -sum or -zum. 



5zi, 

flezi, 

mersi, 

uezi, 

pezi, 

plezi, 

sparsi, 

tersi, 



fizum, 

flezum, 

mersum, 

nezum, 

pezum, 

plezum, 

sparsum, 

tersum, 



figere, 

flectere, 

mergere, 

nectere, 

pectere, 

plectere, 

spargere, 

tergere, 



to fix. 
to bend, 
to sink, 
to hind, 
to comb, 
to plait, 
to scatter, 
to wipe. 



• fityo, " iw «ru.«;," is not used in tlie simple lona. 



182 




.APPENDIX. 




3. 


Perfect in -i. 


{reduplicated;) lupine tn -sum 


and -turn. 


Disco, 

Fango, 

Farco, 

FOBCO, 

Fungo, 
Tangc, 


didici, 

pepigi, 

peperci, 

poposci, 

pupugi, 

tetigi, 


pactum, 
parsum, 

punctum, 
tactum, 


discere, 

panggre, 

parcere, 

poscere, 

pungere, 

tangere, 


to learn, 
to fix. 
to spare, 
to demand, 
to prick, 
to touch. 


4 


Perfect in ■ 


■i, {stem vowel lengthened;) Supine in -turn. 


Ago, 
I'rango, 

Ico, 


egi, 
fregi, 

ici, 


actum, 
fractum, 

ictum, 


ag§re, 
frangere, 

icere, 


to do. 

to break, 
(to strike (a 
X treaty). 


Lego, 

Linquo, 

Viuco, 


legi, 

llqui, 

vici, 


lectum, 

(lictum), 

victum, 


legSre, 

linquere, 

viucere. 


to choose, 
to leave. 
to conquer. 



Tezo, 



Fluo, 



texui, 



fluxi, 



5. Perfect in -ui ; Supine in -turn. 

textum, texere, tc weave. 



6. Guttural Stem disguised. 

rfluxum, or |^^g^^^ 
I fluctum, J 



to flow. 



Struo, 


struxi, 


Btructum, 


struere. 


to pile uf 


Vivo, 


vizi. 


victum. 


vivere, 


to live. 



C— DKHTAIi STKMS. 





1. 


Perfect in -si\ 


Supine in -sum. 




NOTJ 


[.— /) and t are either omitted before s, or are changed into* 


Cedo, 


cessi, 


cessum, 


cedere. 


to yield. 


Claudo, 


clausi, 


clausum, 


claudere, 


to shut. 


Divido, 


divisi, 


di visum, 


dividere, 


to divide. 


Laedo, 


laesi, 


laesum, 


laedere, 


to injure. 


L&do, 


lusi. 


lusum, 


ludere, 


to play. 


Kitto, 


jnjgv 


Tnissum, 


mittere. 


to sevd. 


Plaudo, 


piausi, 


plausum 


plaudSre, 


todapthehands. 



Bado, rftsi, 

Rddo, rSai, 

Trado. trflBi, 

fVado, 

<.Invado, mvaai, 



lilREOULAR VERBS, 



rasum 
rdsum. 
trfisum. 

invasum, 



radSre, 

rSdSre, 

tradgre, 

vadgre, 

invadSre, 



183 



to scrape, 
to gnaw, 
to thriist, 

to (JO. 

to yo ayainst. 



2. Perfect Reduplicated. 



cado, 

Caedo, 
Feudo, 

Tendo, 
Tundo, 



c5cldi. 
cScIdi, 
pependi, 

tgtendi, 
tiitildi, 



c§sam, 

caesum, 

pensum, 

rtensum, 

I tentum, 

/tunsum, 

Ctasutt, 



c&dSre, 

caedgre, 

pendere, 

\ tendSre, 






j- tundgre, 



to fall 

to strike, to cut 

to weigh. 

to stretch, 
to beat. 



Do in composition, to put. 



Abdo, 
Addo, 
Condo, 
Credo, 
Dedo, 
£do, 
Indo, 
Perdo, 
Prodo, 
Reddo, 
Subdo, 
Trado, 
Vendo, 
So also— 
Sisto, 



abdidi, 

addldi, 

coudldi, 

credldi, 

dedidi, 

edidi, 

indidi, 

perdldi, 

prodidi, 

reddidi, 

Bubdidi, 

tradidi, 

vendidi, 

stiti, 



abditum, 

addltum, 

condltum, 

creditum, 

deditum, 

editum, 

ind!tam, 

perditum, 

prddltum, 

redd! turn, 

subditum, 

traditum, 

venditum, 

Btatum, 



abdere, 

addere, 

coudere, 

credere, 

dedgre, 

edere, 

indgre, 

perdere, 

prodere, 

reddere, 

sabdere, 

tradere, 

vendere, 

listgre, 



to hide, 
to add. 
to found, 
to believe. 
to give vp. 
to give forth, 
to put on. 
to ruin, to lose, 
to betray, 
to restore, 
to substitute, 
to hand over, 
to sell. 

tocausetosiand. 



3. Perfect in -i; Supine in -iuxsi. 



Accendo, accendi, 
Cudo, cudi, 

Edo, edi, 

(Fendo, not used, 
Defendo, dSfendi, 
^Offondo, offeiidi, 



\ 



accensum. 

cusum, 

esum, 

dgfensam, 
oJlbaaum, 



accecdere, 

cadgre, 

gdgre, 

defendere, 
offeudere, 



to set on fire, 
to hammer, 
to eat, 
to strike. ) 
to defend, 
to assault. 



184 



APl'KNDIX 



Pindo, 
Fundo, 
Incendo, 
Mando, 

Fando, 

FrShendo, 

Scaudo, 

Sciiido, 
j Strido, 
i Strldeo, 

Verto, 



fldi, flsBnm, 

fQdi, fflsura, 

incendi, incensum, 

luandi (rare), mausuin, 
( pausum or 



pandi, 

pr8hendi, 
Bcandi, 
ecldi, 
strldi, 

verti, 



( passum, 
prSheusum, 
scansum, 
Bcissum, 



versnm, 



flndfiro, 
fundSre, 
incondSre, 
mandSre, 

\ paudSre, 

prfihendere, 
scandSre, 
scindSre, 
Btrld^re, 

vertSre, 



to cleave, 
to pi, \ir. 
to burn, 
to chew. 

to spread. 

to gnmj). 
ti) climb, 
to tear, 
to creak. 

to turn. 



4. Miscellaneous Forms. 






Fido, 


fiBUS sum, 




fidgre, 


to trust. 


MSto, 


messui, 


messum, 


mStSre, 


to mow. 


FSto, 


petivi, 


pgtitum, 


p6t6re, 


to seek. 


Sido. 


sedi; or sidi, 




sIdSre, 


to ait down 



D.— Stems ending in L, M, N. 
1. Perfect in -ui; Supine in -Itum ur -turn. 



Alo, 


Uoi, 


( ailtuin, or 
I altrnn, 


1 aiere, 


to nourish. 


C61o, 


cSloi, 


cultum, 


cdlSre, 


to till. 


ConsiUo, 


consiilui, 


consultum, 


consulgre, 


to conavlt. 


Fremo, 


frSmui, 


frSmitum, 


fremere, 


to roar. 


Gemo, 


gSmui, 


ggmitum, 


ggmSre, 


to groan. 


Gigno, 


gSnui, 


geultmn, 


gignere, 


to produce. 


Mdlo, 


uxSlui, 


mSlltam, 


molSre, 


to grind. 


Occiilo, 


occiilui, 


occultum, 


occulere, 


to conceal. 


Tr5mo, 


tremai, 




tremere, 


to tremble. 


V61o, 


volui, 




velle, 


to wish. 


Vomo, 


vomui, 


vSmltum, 


vomer e, 


to vomit. 



2. Perfect Reduplicated. 



Cano, 


cecini, 


cantum, 


canere, 


to sing. 


FaUo, 


fefelli. 


(falsam,) 


fallere, 


to deceive. 


PeUo, 


pSpiili, 


palsuiu, 


pellere, 


to drive. 




IKRKGUr,/ ft VERBS. 



180 



8. Perfect in 



JD^mo, 
Prdmo, 
Stlmo, 
Temno, 



compii, 
(iempai, 
p romps i 
Bumpsi 
temp$i, 



comptum, 

demptum, 

promptum, 

Bumptum. 

temptum, 



in -turn. 

cdmere, 

dimin, 

pr5mSre, 

idm^re, 

temnSre, 



to adorn, 
to taJce uway, 
to takefmHh. 
to take up. 
to dispiae. 



4. Various Forms. 



Cmo, 

Lino, 

Percello 

Premo, 

SIno, 

Tollo, 

Velio, 



Smi, 

levi, 

perottli, 

presBi, 

Bivi, 

sastaii, 

velli, 



emptuDi 

II turn, 

perculsum, 

pressum, 

eltum, 

sablatum, 

volsum, 



Smfire, 

llnSre, 

percellgre, 

nrgmSre, 

sindre, 

toUgro, 

vellgre, 



to buy. 
' ' smear. 
ti strike down 
topresK. 
to permit, 
to raise up. 
to pluck. 



Cerno, 

Carro, 

Fgro, 

Gere, 

Qaaero, 

Sero, 

Sero, 

Sperno, 

Sterno, 

Tero, 

Cro, 



E.— Stems Ending iw E. 

orSvi, critum, 

cucurri, curBum, 

tiili, latum, 

gesai, geatum, 

quaeaivi. quaeaitum, 

aerui, aertum, 

»evi, aatum, 

sprevi, apretum, 

stravi, atratum, 

trivi, tritum, 

uaai, uatum, 



cernSre, 


to divide. 


currere, 


to run. 


ferre, 


to bear, carry. 


gerere, 


to carry. 


quaerere, 


to seek. 


serere, 


to entwine. 


agrSre, 


to sow. 


apemere. 


to despise. 


aternere, 


to strew. 


terSre, 


tc rub. 


urere, 


to bum. 



Arceaao, 
Capesso, 
Lacesso, 
Pono, 

ViBO, 



F.— Stems Ending in S, X. 



arceaaivi, 

capessiv?. 

laceasivi, 

pSsai, 

viBi. 



arceasitum, 
capesaitum, 
l&ceaaltum, 
pSaltum, 



arcesagre, 
capeaaere, 
Uceaaere, 
ponfire. 



to send up, 
to take in hand, 
to provoke, 
to place. 
to visit. 




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186 



APPENDIX. 



6.— Stems Ending in U, V. 
Perfect in -i ; Swpine in -turn. 



f Abnao, 
i Annuo, 


abnoi, 




abnuere. 


to refuse. 


annul, 




annuere 


to assent. 


Icuo, 


&cai, 


^cfltum, 


&cuere. 


to sharpen. 


Arguo, 


argui, 


argutum, 


arguore, 


to prove. 


Congruo, 


congrui, 




congruere, 


to agree. 


Exuo, 


ezui, 


exutum, 


exuere. 


to put off. 


Imbuo, 


imbui, 


imbfltum, 


imbuere. 


to soak. 


Induo, 


indui, 


indfltum, 
/lautum. 


iuduere. 


to put ort. 


L&vo, 


lavi, 


s Idtum, 
'iSvatum, 


> lavere. 


to wash. 


Luo, 


lui. 




luSre, 


to atone. 


Metno, 


mgtui, 




metuere, 


to fear. 


MTnuo, 


minui, 


miufltum, 


mlnuere, 


to lessen. 


Pluit, 


f pluit, or 
\ plflvit, 


} - 


pluere, 


to rain. 


Riio, 


rui, 


frultum. or 
I riitum, 


j-rugre, 


to rufih. 


Solvo, 


solvi, 


solfltum. 


solvere, 


to loosen. 


St&tuo, 


st&tui, 


st&tutum. 


st&tugre, 


to set up. 


Tribuo, 


tribui. 


tributum, 


tribuere. 


to distribute 


Volvo, 


volvi, 


vSmtum, 


volvSre, 


to roll. 



H.— Verbs Endihq in -SCO. 

Verbs which end in -sco are called inceptive or inchoative; that is, they 
denote the beginning of an action. 



AbSlesco, abSlevi, 

AdSlesco, fidoievi, 

Cd&lesco, coalui, 

Conciipisco, conciipivi, 

Conv&lesco, conv&lui, 

Cresco, crevi, 

Exdlesco, exdlevi. 



Nosco, 
Pasco, 
Quiescj, 

Suesco, 



nSvi, 
P&vi, 
quievi, 

fiuSvi, 



&bolItum, 

&dultum, 

coalitum, 

conciipltum, 

conv&litum, 

crgtum, 

exSlItum^ 

nStum, 

pastum, 

quietun>, 

Buetum 



&boJescere, to grow out of v^ 
fiddlescere, to grow up. 
coalescere, to grow together. 
conoiipiscere, to desire. 
convalescgre, to grow strong. 
Crescere, to grow. 

exolescere. to grow old. 

to kiiow. 

to feed. 

to hetome quiet. 



noscere, 
pascerc, 
quiescere, 

BuescSre, 



(to grow aocua 
X turtied. 



lEREOULAB VERBS. 



187 



C&pio, 

Oilpio, 

F&cio, 

F5dio, 

Ffigio, 

Jacio, 

Pario, 

Qa&tio, 

B&pio, 



I^. THIRD AND FOURTH CONJLGATIONS COMBINED. 



cepi, 

ciipivi, 

feci, 
fodi, 

fligi, 

jeci, 

pSperi, 

(quassi,) 

r&poi, 



captam, 

ciipitam, 

factum, 

fossum, 

ftlgltam, 

jactam, 

partam, 

qaassum, 

raptum, 



cipere, 


to take. 


cupere, 
f&cire, 
f5d§re, 
fiigere. 


to desire, 
to make, 
to dig. 
to flee. 


jacere. 


to throw. 


parere, 
qu&t§re, 


to bring forth 
to shake. 


rapere, 


to seize. 



they 

fusi 
her. 
ig. 



id. 



The regular forms 
audire, to hear. 

Apgrio, 



. THE FOURTH CONJUGATION, 
are -Ivi and -itum: as, audio, 



So, 

Fulcio, 

Haurio, 

Opgrio, 

Saepio, 

Salio, 

Sancio, 

Sentio, 
Sepelio, 
Vgnio, 
Vinoio, 



&pgrui, 

ivi, 

fulsi, 

hausi, 

6perui, 

saepsi, 

sal-ui, or- 

sanzi, 

sensi, 
sepelivi, 
veni, 
viusi, 



fipertum, 
itum, 
fultum, 
haustum, 
opertum, 
saeptum, 
ii) saltum, 
f sancitum, or 
V sanctum, 
seusum, 
sep'iltum, 
ventum, 
viuctum. 



&perire, 

ire, 

fuloire, 

haurire, 

operire, 

satpire, 

salire, 

I sancire, 

sentire, 
sepelire, 
venire, 
vincire. 



andivi, audltum, 

to open. 

to go. 

to prop. 

to draw (water). 

to cover. 

to fence in. 

to leap. 

to ratify. 

to feel, to think, 
to bury, 
to come, 
to bin'i. 



VL DEPONENT VERBa 
First Conjugation. 



i 



10» 


APPENDIX. 






Second Conjugation, 




F&teor, 


fassuB Bum, 


f&teri, 


to con/eta. 


LIceor, 


IXcIcuB Bum, 


llceri, 


to bid at a sale. 


M5reor, 


mSrltus sum, 


mSreri, 


to earn, to deserve. 


MlsSreor, 


'mlsfirltas Rom, 
. mlBortuB BTun, 


^J-mlBSrSri, 


to take pity on. 


Folllceor, 


pollXcItoB sum, 


polltcSri, 


to promise. 


Reor, 


r&tas som, 


reri, 


to think. 


Tneor, 


tnltoB Bum, 


tuSri, 


to protect. 


Vfireor, 


virXtus sum, 


vgreri, 


to fear. 



Third Conjugation. 



Ampleotor, 


amplexnB Bum, 


ampleoti, 


to embrace. 


( ApiBOor, 
\ Adlpiflcor, 


aptuB Bom, 


&pisci, 


to ohtain. 


&deptns sum, 


&dlpi8ci, 


to ohtain. 


ComminiBCor, 


GommentaB sum, 


commlnisci 


, to devise. 


Compleotor, 


complexuB btuh, 


complecti, 


to embrace. 


Def6tiscor, 


defessuB Bum, 


defgtisci, 


to grow weary. 


Fruor, 


ffrulttts Bum, or 
\ fructuB Bom, 


}frui, 


to enjoy. 


Fnngor, 


fonctuB stun, 


fungi. 


to perform. 1 


Or&dior, 


grOBBUB Bum, 


gr&di. 


to step. 1 


IraBCor, 




Xrasci, 


to he angry. 1 


L&bor, 


lapBUB Bum, 


l&bi, 


to slip. 1 


LSquor, 


15cfltuB Bum, 


I5qui, 


' to speak. 1 


MSrior, 


mortuuB sum, 


mSri, 


to die. 1 


NanciBcor, 


nactUB sum. 


nancisci, 


to obtain by chance. 1 


NaBCor, 


natuB Bum, 


nasci, "- 


to be born. 1 


NItor, 


fnixuB Bum, or 
\ nlBUB Bum, 


}nlti, 


to strain. I 


ObliviBOor, 


oblituB sum. 


obllvisci, 


to forget. I 


P&tior, 


passuB sum, 


p&vi, 


to suffer. m 


FrSfloiscor, 


prSfeotus sum. 


prSflcisoi, 


to set out. I 


QnSror, 


questus sum. 


qugri, 


to complain. 


B&mlniEcor, 




remlnisci, 


to remember, 


KSvertor, 


rSversus sum. 


reverti, 


to return. 


Sgquor, 


sSofLtuB sum, 


sequi, 


to follow. 


Uloiscor, 


ultuB sum. 


nloisci, 


to avenge. 


Ctor, 


tlBUB sum, 


£ti, 


to use. 


V<»Mor, 




vesoi, 


to eat. 



hance. 



fRREOULAR VERBS. 



189 



le. 
serve. 



Assentior, 

Blandior, 

Expgrior, 

Largior, 

Mentior, 

Metior, 

Molior, 

Oppgrior, 

Ordior, 

Orior, 

Partior, 

Pdtior, 

Sortlor, 



Fourth Conjugation. 



assepsQs sum, 
blandltns sain, 
ezpertns earn, 
largitua sum, 
mentltns sum, 
mensus sum, 
molltns sum, 
/oppertus sum, 
l opperltus sum, 
orsDs sum, 
ortus sum, 
parUtus sum, 
pfifitns sum, 
sortttns sum, 



assentiri, 

blandiri, 

expgriri, 

largiri, 

mentiri, 

metiri, 

mdliri, 



ordiri, 

8rlri, 

partlri, 

pSGri, 

ar.rtiri. 



to agree to, 
to flatter, 
to try. 

to give bowitifuUy 

to lie, 

to measure. 

to labour. 



}-opp«riri, to wait /or. 



to begin, 
to rise, 
to divide. 

to obtain possession qf 
to take by lot. 



ill 



LATIN VOCABULARY. 



A., abt^eviation for proper name, Aulnn. 
A, {or ab, or aba,) prep, uith abl, from, 

by; (of time) after. 
Ab, same at a. It <3 naed before h and 

the vowels, but also before many 

words beginning with consonants. In 

lome compound words it bPcomea au; 

as, avfero tor ab-fero, 
AbdICO, abdixi, abdictum, abdlc-6re, to 

refuse approval; to deprive one of (by 

lato). (Ab, dico.) 
AbdIC-0, Svi, atum, 5re, to retire from, 

resign, abdicate. (Ab, dlco.) 
Abdlt-US, a, urn, perf. part of abdo, 

hidden, put away. 
Abdo, abdldi, abditum, abd-5re, to put 

aside, hide, remove. (Ab, do.) 
AbdiiCO, abduxl, abductum, abduc-8re, 

to lead away, remove. (Ab, duco.) 
Abeo, abli (Jor abiv'), aWtum, abi-re, to 

go away, depart; escape. (Ab, eo.) 
AblgO, abggi, abactum, abig-gre, to drive 

off. (Ab, ago.) 
Ablat-US, a, um, perf. part, of aufero, 

(which see.) 
Abla-0, 1, tum, Sre, to wash off or away ; 

to atone for. (Ab, luo.) 
Abs, prep., (see a.) It is used before the 

consonants c and t, and sometimes be- 
fore p and g. 
Absens, gen. absent-is, (part, t/absum, 

used as adj.,) absent. 
AbsistO, abstlti, (no sup.,) absist-Sre, to 

give over, cease, desist: absistite tim- 

gre, cease to fear. (Ab, sisto.) 
Abstin-eo, ui, (en)tum, ere, to hold off 

from, keep back from; to abstain. (Ab, 

teneo.) 
Abstuli, perf. o/aufera 



Abstr&ho, abstraxi, abstractum, abs- 

trah-6re, to drag off, tear away. (Ab, 

ti'aho.) 
AbBTUn, abfui (or afui), abesse, to be 

absent. (Ab, sum.) 
Abutor, abusus sura, abut-l, (dep.) to 

abuse, misuse. (Ab, utor.) 
Ac, coiy., and, and moreover. Usually 

employed only before consonants. 
Accedo, access-i, accessum, acced-6re, 

to advance (towards), approach. (Ad, 

cedo.) 
Accend-O, I, accensnm, accendSre, to set 

on fire, kindle, inflame. 
Accens-U8, a, um, perf. part of ac- 

cendo. 
Accept-ns, perf. part, of accipio. 
Accid-O, i, fire, to fall to, or to fall near: 

accidit, (impers.) it hap^^ (Ad, 

c&do.) 
Acc-10, Svl, Itum, ire, to summon, call 

(Ad, cleo, or cio, to call) 
Accipio, a£c5pi, acceptum, acclp-5re, to 

receive, get; take, accept; hear. (Ad, 

capio.) 
Accipiter, accipitr-ls, m., a hawk. 
Accit-UB, a, um, perf. part, of accio. 
Acci-UB, 1, m. Accius, a proper na^ne: 

Accius Navius, a Roman augur. 
Accurr-O, i, (seldom accucurri,) accurs- 

um, accurr-6re, to rush towards, or up 

to. (Ad, curro.) 
Acctisator, is, m., an accuser, informer. 
AccuS-0, avi, atum, are, to lay to one's 

charge, accuse, blame. (Ad, causa.) 
Acer, acr-is, acr-e, adj., sfuxrp, piercing, 

keen ; active, lively ; fierce. 
Acerb-US, a, um, sour; bitter; disagree' 

able, annoying. (Stan a"- sharp.) 



Aeerrime, (adv. tn mptri) mott lutav. 

<tc. (SeeAer.) 
Acld-UB, a, um, $<yuri bitter; punffent; 

tutrth. (Aceo, to bt tow, Ac.) 
Aci-es, ei, /, a point or edge; battle 

array, line of battle. 
Acriter, adv., (seep. lOO.) keenly, sharplv. 
ACt-U8, a, um, per/, part, of ago. 
Acu-8, us, /., a needle orpin. 
Acat-as, a, um, tharp, pointed; inUUi- 

gent; severe. (Acuo.) 
Ad, prep, uith aec, to, towards; at; 
op, near, in compound words ad is 
often written ac, qf, op, at, Ac, accord- 
ing to first letter of second part of 
compound. 
Adam-0, arl, atum, are, to lov« exceed- 
ingly. (Ad, amo.) 
Addico, addixl, addlctum, addlcgre, to 
<went to; to assign, award, tnake over 
to. (Ad, dico.) 
Ad-do, dTdl, ditum, dgre, to put to, add 
annex. (Ad, do.) ' 

Addaco, adduxl, adductum, adduc-Sre, 
to lead to; bring forward; persuade 
induce. (Ad, duco.) ' 

Adgo, fcdll (for adivi). adttum, adi-re, to 

go to, approach; visit. (Ad, eo.) 
Adeo, adv., to such a degree; so much- 
so far; so long. ' 

Adept-US, a, \xm,perfpart. o/adipiscor. 
Adlect-O, avi, fitum, are, to aim at, 
a^tre to. (Frequentative, ^om afflcio.) 
Adffiro, (or affero), adtull, (or attull), 
allatum, adferre, (or afferre), to bring 
to; carry to ; bring about, cause. 
AOlIcio, (or afflcio,) adfBcl, adfectum 
adfic-6re, to influence the mind; affect'- 
adflcietur malo, he shall be visited with 
misfortune; l.e., be punished (Ad. 
facie.) ' 

A^fl™°' ^'^ afflrmo,— wAfcA see.) 
Adflictus, a, um, perf part, o/adfligo. 
Attfligo, adflixl, adflictum, adfllg-gie, to 
dash down, strike down; weaken. (Ad 
fligo.) ' 

Adhlb-eo, ni, rtum, gre, to hold to- 
apply to; put in force; use, employ. 
(Ad, hubeo.) 

Adipiscor, adeptus sum, adiplsc-;., (dep. 

3,) to reach, overtake, gain, obtain, (Ad 

apiscor, to get.) 
Adjungo, adjunxi. adjunctum, adjung- 

6ie to Join to, bind, unite. (Ad, jungo ) 
Admlnistr-O, 9vi, atum, are, to man- 

age, guide, direct. (Ad, mlnlstro.) 



LATIV VOCABULARY. 



191 



Admiribn-H, is, e, worthy of being ad. 
jnired; wonderful (Admlror.) 

Admir-or, atus sum, art, (dtp. i,) ut 
wonder at ; admire. (Ad, mlror.) 

Admon-eo, ul, itum, Sre, to remind: 
to warn, admonish. (Ad, moneo.) 

AdmSveo, admOr-l, admStnm. admSr- 
ere, to move towards; brincf on; apply 
to. (Ad, moveo.) ' Wf 

Adn&t-o, avl, atum, are, to twim to. 
(Ad, nata) 

AdSlesceni, adolescent-ls, m. or /, a 

young man or teoman. (Adolesco.) 
AdolescO, adol-8vi (rarely -ul), adul- 
tum, adole8c.«re, to grow up, increase. 
AOer-o, avl, atum, are, to pray to, wor. 

ship, adore. (Ad, oro.) 
Adpar-eo, (or appareo,) nl, itum, ere. 

to appear clearly, to be evident 
Adpet-o, (or appeto,) Ivl, itum, 6re. 
to seek to, try to get, avn at, aspire to; 
^<^tchat; assail, attack. (Ad, peto.) 
Aascribo, (or ascribo,) adscripsi, ad- 
scriptura, adscrib-6re, to ascribe, impute 
to; apply to. (Ad. Bcribo.) 
Adspioio, (or ftsplcio.) adspexl, id- 
spectum, adsplc-6re, to look at, behold, 
o6««rre. (Ad, spgclo, to look.) 
Adsu-esco, (or assuesco,) gvl. Slum 
escgre, to be accustomed to. ' 

Adsum, adfiil, adesse, to be ai iMnd; to 

be present. (Ad, sum.) 

Adtingo, (or attingo), attTgl, attactum, 

adtmg-6re, to touch, reach. (Ad, tango.) 

AQUlt-US, a, um, per/ part. 0/ adolesco. 

Adveni-o, adven-l, tum, Ire, to come to, 

approach, arrive at. (Ad, vcnio.) 
Aavent-US, us, m., an approacl.; ar- 

nvau (Advenlo.) 
Advers-us, a, rxm, adverse, unfavourable 
to : res adversae, adversity -. ex advei-so, 
opposite, (perf part, o/adverto.) 
Adversus, prep. wUh accus., against 
Advoc-0, avi, atum, are, to call to, sum- 

won. (Ad, voce.) 
Advol-0, avi, atum, are, to fly to; dart 

forward. (Ad, v61o.) 
Aed-es, is, /, a temple: also in pi, a 
house. 

Aedif ic-0, a\1, atum, are, to build, erect 
(Aeqes, faclo.) 

Aedu-i, oi-um, m., the Aedui, a people of 
OauL ' 

Aeger, aegr-a, aegr-um, sick, diseased. 
Aegre, adv., with difficulty: aegre ferre, 
to take (something) amist. (Aeger.) 



192 



LATIN VOCABULARY. 



I 



Aegrlttld-O, Inls, /, ikkneu ; $orrou). 

(Aeger.) 
Aeqn&l-il, 1«, e, equal, limOar; of the 

tame age, (Aequuai) 
Aequitas, aequitat-is, /., fairness, jus- 
tice, equity. (Aequus.) 
Aequ-O, avl, atum, fire, to make equal 
(with), to equal; to level, put on a level 
tcith. (Aequus.) 
Aequ-US, a, um, equal: equable; smooth: 
aequus animus, composure of mind, 
equanimity; contentment. 
Aes, aer-ls, n., brass; copper. 
Aesdp-U8, 1, m., Aesop. 
AestaS, aestat-ls,/., summer; heat 
Aetas, aetat-ls, /, age; life; time (gent- 
rally). 
Aetem-tlS, a, nm, everlasting, eternal 
Affero, attuU, aUatum, affere. (fiwadfero.) 
AfficiO. (See adflcio.) 
Affirm-O, (or adflrmo,) iri. Stum, Sre, 
allege, t^irm, declare: cot\firm. (Ad, 
flrmo, to make strong.) 
Afflict-TU, petf. part, of affligo, or ad- 

fligo, (which see.) 
Age, agtte, imperat. of ago, ustd as ini r- 

jections,—Come onl Now then I Weill 
Ager, ftgr-l, m., a field; a dutrict; the 

country; land. 
Agger, aggSr Is, in., a mound, heap of 

earth, a rampxrU (Ad, gero.) 
Aglt-0, avl, atum, fire, to debate (with 
one'sse^,ponder. (Frequentative,Aom 
ago.) 
Ago, 5gl, actum, Sg-Sre, to do, act, treat 
with; lead, drive: agere gratlas, to 
give thanks: agere augurium, to take 
an augury: agere consulem, to play 
the consul : agere de pace, to treat of 
peace: agitur, it is debated. 
Agn-a, ae,/., a (she) lamb. 
AgnOSCO, agnOvi, agnltum, agnosc-6re, 
to ac'Mowledge, recognise. (Ad, nosco.) 
Agn-UB, i,m.,a lamb. 
AgpreBt-is, is, e, belonging to the country, 
rttstic: as subst, a countryman. (Ager.) 
Agric61-a, ae, m., a husbandman, far- 
mer. (Ager, colo.) 
Agripp-a, ae, m., prop, name of man. 

Agrippa Menenius, (R. II. 12.) 
Ai-0, /»ay. (S«ep.96.) 
Al-a, ae,/, otctng. 
Alb-a, ae,/, Alha, a town in Latium. 
Alban-US, a, um, belonging to Alba, Al- 
ban: in p/., Albanl, orum, the Albans. 
Alb-OB, a, um, white. 



AlSs, alTt-ls, m. or/, a winged creature 

a bird. (Ala.) 
Alexander, Alexandr-l, m., Altjcamler. 
Alias, adv., at another time, in another 

way. (Alius.) 
Alien-UB, a, um, belonging to another, 

strange: aes alienum, debt. (Alius.) 
Aliquando, adv., sometimes ; once ou a 

time. 
Aliquantum, adv., in a considerable 

degree; somewhat 
Aliqais, allqua, aliquod, or allqnld, some 

(person or thing). 
Aliquot, adv., several, some, sundry. 

(Alius, quot) 
Ali-U8, a, ud, atother, (of many). (Set 
alter.) AlU-alli, some— others. (See 
p. 35, 8.) 
Allat-UB, pw/ part, o/adfero, {whkh see.) 
Alli-a, ae, /, Allia, a tributary of the 
Tiber, on the banks of which the Oauls 
defeated the Romans, B.C. 390. 
Alllcio, allexl, allectum, alllc-Sre, to en- 
tice, allure, inveigle. (Ad, laclo, to coax.) 
AUienB-is, is, e, belonging to the Allia. 
AllIg-0, avi, atum, are, to bind to, at- 

tach. (Ad, Uga) 
AllSquor, allocatus sum, allSqul, (dep, 
8,) to speak to, address. (Ad, loquor.) 
Al-0, ui, Itum, ere, to nourish, support, 

fatten. 
Alp-es, ium, m., the Alps. 
Altar-e, is, n., an altar. (Altns.) 
Alter, altera, alteram, (gen. in lus), an- 
other of two, ttte second. (Seep. 35, 8.) 
Alt-US, a, um, htgh, taU: also detp: 

alta voce, vnih a loud voice. (Alo.) 
Alv6-UB, i, m., a hollow ; a hollowed log; 
an ark ; a hive; the channel of a river. 
Alv-US,*-i, /., the belly ; stomach; also a 

bee- hive. 
Ambag-es, um, /. pi (abl sing., am- 
bage), a roundabout way; obscurt 
hints; quibbles; circumloctUion. (Ambi, 
ago.) 
Ambo, ae, 0, both, two together. 
Ambdl-0, avi, atum, are. to wdli about. 
Anuciti-a, ae,/,/nendjAip. (Amicus.) 
AmlC-US, i, m., a friend. (Amo.) 
AmittO, amisl, amissum, amltt-ere, to 
throw away; lose; dismiss. (A, mitta) 
Amn-is, is, m., a river. 
Am-O, avi, atum, are, to love. 
Amor, amOr-is, m., love. 
AmSveo, amSvi, amOtum, amSv-iSre, to 
move away, remove. (A, mOveo.) 



LA.TIN VOOABTTLARY. 



193 



(See 



Ampleotor, ainplexns sum, amplectl, 
(rfep. 3.) to embrace. 

Ampl-ns, a, urn, Bpaeiovs, large. 

Amlili-ug, 1, m., Amulius, (proper 
name.) 

An, coty. or adv., if, whether or not. 

Ancll-e, Is, n., a sacred shield, (tchich u>as 
supposed to have fallen from heaven in 
the reiffn of Numa.) 

Ancill-a, ae, /, a maid-servant. 

Anc5r-&, ae, /, an anchor. 

Anc-U8 (Martius), 1, m., fourth king of 

Borne. 
AngU8tI-ae, arnm, /, pi, straits, a de- 
file. (Angu?tu8.) 

AngUSt-US, a, um, tMrrow, confined, 
strait. 



kr\\maAr,t,r'* « . t a ArDiwi-um, 1, «., judgment, decision, 

Ammadvert-O, !, animadversum, anim- pleasure (in the sense of uHU). (Frmk 



Apprehend-0, 1, appreliennim, appro- 
hend-«re, to seize, lay hold qf. (Ad, 
prehendo. 

Apprehens-ns, a, um, p«rf, part, q/ 
apprehendo. 

Appropinqu-0, ftrf, atum, are, to ap- 

proach, (Ad, proplnquus.) 
Apte, adv., fitly, properly, suitably. 
Apud, prep, with aecu*., mar; at; among. 
Aqu-a, ae, /, water. 
Aqull-a, ae, /, an eagle. 
Ar-a, ae,/, an altar. 
Arane-a, ae, /, (or araneum, i, n.,) a 

spider; a spider's web. 
Ar&tor, aratOr-is, to., a ploughman. 
Aratr-um, l, n., a plough. (Aro.) 
Arbitri-um, l, n., judgment, decision. 



advertfire, to perceive, observe; punish. 
(Animus, ad, verto.) 
Animal, anlmal-ls, n., a living creature, 

rn animal. (Anima, life.) 
Anim-mi, l, m., the mind, spirit, disposi- 
tion. (Anima.) 
Anniil-us, i, m., a ring. 
Ann-US, i, m., a year. 
Anser, ansCr-is, TO. or/., a goose. 
Ante, prep, governing accus., before, in 

f^ont of; adv., before, {of time and 

place.) 
Antecedo, antecessi, antecessum, ante- 

ced-6re, to go b^ore. (Ante, cedo.) 
Antiqa-US, a, um, old, ancient; former. 
Antdni-US, 1, to., Antony, 
Antr-um, i, n., a cave, grotto. 
An-US, us,/, an old woman. 
Aper, apr-i, to., a wild boar. 
ApSr-io, ui, turn, Ire, to open, uncover; 

make known. 

Aper^US.a, um, perf. part, of aperio, 

and adj., open. 
Ap-is, is,/, a bee. 
Apollo, ApoUIn-is, m., Apollo, god of 

music, &c 

App&rat-ag, U8, m., preparation. 

Appgr-eo, ui, Jtum, ere, to appear, be 
manifest. (Set adpareo.) 

Appell-0, avi, fttum, ire, to can to, call 
on, name. 

Append-0, i, appensum, append-gre, to 
hang on, weigh. (Ad, pendo.) 

Appens-UB, a, um, perf. part, of ap- 
pendo, weighed. 

Appeto. (See adpeto.) 

Appiufl (CJaudlns), i, to., one of the De- 
cemviri. 



(132) 



13 



arbiter, an umpire.) 
Arbor, (or arbos), arbSr-ls,/, a tree. 
Arc-eo,ui,[Itum,]ere, to keep off, hinder 
Arcess-O, Ivi, Itum, Sre, to tend for, 

summon, eaU. 
Arc-US, us, TO., a bow, arch. 
Arde-a, ae, /, Ardea, a town in Latium. 
Ardeo, arsl, arsum, ard-Sre, to bum, 

blaze, be dry (as with thirst or great heat). 

Argent-um, i, »., silver. 
Argument-um, l, n., an argument; 

lesson ; proof; fable. (Arguo.) 
Arid-US, a, um, dry, parched. (Areo.) 
Ariovist-US, l, m., Ariovistut, king of 

the Germans. 

Aristld-es, is, m., Aristides, a celebrated 

Athenian. 
Arm-a, orum, n. pi, armour; arms^ 

weapons. 
Annat-ns, a, nm, perf. part, j/armo. 
Armill-a, ae, /, a bracelet, armlet. 

(Armus.) 
Arm-o, avi, atum, are, to arm, put on 

armour. 
Ar-0, avi, atum, 5re, io plough, cuUivate, 

Arrept-US, a, um, perf part, o/arripla 
Arrip-io, ui, arrepium, arrip-gre, to 

seize, lay hold of. (Ad, rapio.) 
Arroganti-a, ae,/, arrogance, assump. 

tion. (Arrogo, ie. ad, rogo.) 
Ars, artis,/, en-t; skill 
Art-US, a, um, (or arctus.) tight, close, 

narrow. 
Art-US, fls, TO., aJoinL 
Aruns (Tarquinius), Anmti^ to.. Arum 
Arv-um, l, n., a Jleld; properly, a 

ploughedfield. (Arc.) 



,ir' 






104 



LATIN VOOABTniATlV. 






Arx, Arc-\n,/.,aeH<tdft,/orlreu. 

Al, i>Ml»i m., an at, a Hoinan coin ; also, 
a pound iteight. 

Ascend-O, i, nscennnm, ascend-Pre, to 
climb up, mount, cuamd. (Ai\, scttiido.) 

Asell •Ul, t. m < (diminutive qf aalnu^) u 
little ast ; a wortMeu au, 

Asi-a, ae,/., Alia. 

Asln-us, i, m., an au, donkey. 

Aspoct-O, ftvi, fituin, fti e, to look at, re- 
garii. 

Asper, a, nm, rough ; harth, tevere. 

AssSr-O, ui, turn, ere, to Join to; take 
hold of: as«erere In Bervitutem, to 
claim at a slave ; literally, to lay hold 
of for ilavery, 

ASBflmo, assumpnl, aHRumptum, as- 
ium-ere, to take to one; tak«up; re- 
ceive. (Ad, Bumo.) 

Astr-nm, i, »., « *tar. 

Asyl-um, l, «■, a place of shelter, an asy- 
lum. 

At, conj., but ; but yet ; at least. 

Athen-ae, arum,/ pi., Athens. 

Atqne, cor\)., and. (See ac.) 

Atqui, adv., but yet ; but nevertheless. 

AtroZ, get. atrOc-la, fierce, savage, cruel. 

Attlc-i, onim, m., the people of Attica. 

Attlc-US, a, um, belonging to Attica; 
Athenian, 

AttingO, atttgl, attactnm, attlnpf-gre, to 
touch, reach. (AiX, taiiKO.) 

AttonIt-U8, a, um, perf part, of attmo, 
(to thunder at,) thunderstruck; amazed; 
bewildered. 

Anctor, auctOr-ls, m., an author; found- 
er; first inventor. (Anpeo) 

Auctoritas, auctorltat-lB, /, authority ; 
influence; dignity. (Auctor.) 

Auct-US, a, um, perf. part, of augco. 

Audaci-a, ae,/, 6o?dneM, dannjr. (Au- 

•lax.) 
Audax, gen., andSc-ls, ac^., bold, daring, 

foolhardy. (Audeo.) 
AudSo, ausus sum, aud-5re, to be bold; 

to dare. 



Aud-To, Ivl, \lam. Ire, lo he/tr. lint-n. 
AufSro, abitull, ablatum, auiune, to 

carry off, bear away. (Ab, fero.) 
Auf&g-io, 1, Ituin, fire, to Jtet avafi 

(Ab, fuglo.) 
Augeo, auxi, anctnm, aug-9re, to tn- 

creau. 
Augur, augflr-K wi., an augur, a seer; 

a pi'ieH who foretold future tvents by 

ohferviiig birds and olhfr omens. (Ety- 
mology doubtful.) 
Augiiri-uin, 1, n., an augury, prop/tecy. 

(Aiigiir.) 
AugUSt-U8, a, um, venerable; august. 

(Augeo.) 
Anl-a, ae,/., a hall; court; palcu*. 
Aul-UB, i, m., Auhit, a proper name, 
Aur-a, ae, /., a breeze. 
Aure-UI, a, nm, golden, made of gold. 
Aur-is, Is, /, an ear. 
Auritiil-u8, i, n*., (dimin. o/aui itun.Awn 

aurls), a little animal with long ears, 
Aur-um, l, n., gold. 
Auspici-um, l, »., an omen (J'rotn birdt); 

an auspice. (Avis, Bpicio.) 
Aut, conj., either: aut— aut, either— or 
Autem, adv., but; but on the contrary^ 

however. 
Auxlli-um, 1, n., aid, help. (Augeo.) 
Avar-US, a, um, covetous, greedy. (Aveo, 

to desire.) 
Avert-0, l, aversum, cvert-gre, to turn 

away, avert. (A, verto.) 
Aventin-US, l, m., Aventine, one of the 

hills of Rome. 
Avide, adv., greedily; eagerly. (Avldus.) 
AvIdltaS, avlditat-ls, /., greediness; 

eagerness. (Avldus.) 
Avld-U8, a, um, desirous, eager; greedy. 

(Aveo,' to desire.) 
Av-iS, is, /., a bird. 
Av61-0, avl, atum, are, to fly away. (A, 

volo.) 
Avuncul-U8, 1, m., an uncle, (mother's 

brother.) (Avua) 
Av-U8, 1, tn., a grand{father. 



I 



B. 



B&cHl-um, i, n., and bacul-us, 1, m., a 

staff, stick. 
Barb-a, ae,/, a heard. 
Barb&r-US, a, um, <^ strange speech ; 

foreign; uncivilised: as subat, a bw- 

barian : pi. foreignert. 



Barb&t-US, a, nm, bearded: as a subst., 

the goat. 
Beat-US, a, um, blessed; happy. (Boo.) 
Belg-a, ae, f/i., a Belgian. 
Belncos-UB, a, nm, warUtt: fond c^ 

war. 



LATIN VOOAHTTLARY. 



106 



Bflll-nm. 1, n., var. 

B8n8fIoi-am, l, n., a Undterviee; /i- 
vour; btn^t. 

BSnS, adv., well. (Bonna.) 

Bendvolenti-A, ae, /., ffood-wUl; kind- 
ne.M. (Dene, volo.) 

BSnigne, adv., kindly ; generously ; boun- 
tifully, (nenlfjnus.) 

Benignltas, benlfcnltat-ls, /., bounty; 
generusity; kindness. (Uenlgnus.) 

BSnign-US, a, um, bountiful; generous; 
kind, (Hen [bene], and root of gigno.) 

Besti- a, ae, /., a beast. 

BI'j 0, i, (Ttnm,) 6rp, to drink. 

Bllingn-is, is, o, double-tongued; deceit- 
fid. (Bi [two] llnRua.) 

Bln-i, ae, a, turo each (time, individual, 
<tc) (See Distrib. Numerals, p. 39.) 

Bis, adv., twice. (Seep. 39.) 

Blandlti-a, ao, /, (more usual in pi., 
blandltl-ae, arum,) a caressing, fond- 
ling; flattery. (Blandus.) 

BSnitas, bonitat-is,/., goodness; worth. 
(Bonu!.) 

BSn-um, i, n., a good thing; blessing; 



advantage: in pi, bona, goodf, pro- 
perty. 
B6n-Ul, a, nm, good; mortd; uprig/df 

beautiful, i:. 
B68, bOv-ls, m. or /., an ox or eow: in 

pi., hovcn, cattle. (Seep.SX) 
Br&chi-um, l, n., an arm, (properly, 

from hand to elbow.) lacertub, from 

elbow to shoulder. 
Brgv-^8, Is, e, short, hritf: brevl, abl, 

in a short time, or briefly. 
Brivlter, <sdv., shortly, briefly. 
Britann-i, orum, t,\. tht Britons; sing, 

BrltannuB. 
BrUm-a, ao, /., ths winter tolstics ; icinlcr, 

(as If brevima, ^revitsima, ie., tli« 

shortest day.) 
Brat-US (L. Junius), 1, m., Brutus, (pro- 

per name:) also, com. adj., heavy; 

sluggish; stupid. 
B\ibil-e (or b6vile),l8,n.,«»»o«*toZ;. (Boi.) 
Btlbnlo-as, i, m., a hsrdsman, oxherd. 
BuU-a, ae, /., a knob ; a boss, (usually qf 

gold, worn on neck of Roman children of 

upper classes.) 



0. 



Cy an abbreviation for Caius. 

Cadaver, c&davgr-ls, «., a dead body, 
carcass. (Cado.) 

C&do, c^cldl, cfisnm, c&d-Sre, to fall; 
happen. 

Caec-US, a, nm, blind. 

Caed-es, is, /, a cutting; slaughter; 
combat; blood. (Caedo.) 

Caedo, cScIdi, caesam, caed-ere, to cut ; 
km, slay. 

Caeli-U8, l, m., CckUus, one of the hUls 
of Rome, 

Caesar, CaesSr-ls, tn., Caesar. 

Caesari-€S, el,/, a head of hair. 

Calamltas, calamltat-ls, /, a disaster, 
mitfortum, calamity, drfeat (Etymo- 
logy doubtful) 

Calcar, calcar-ls, n., a spur. (Calx.) 

G&lend-ae, arum,/., the Calends, or first 
day of the month. (From old verb calo, 
to call, proclaim; as tlie priests an- 
nounced the first day of each month.) 

CS.l-eo (and calesco), ui, 5re, to be 
warm, 

Callld-US, a, um, knowing, cunning, 
crafty, 

Cftlor, calOr-is, »K., heat, (Galea) 



Calv-us, a, um, bald. 
Calx, calc-iB, /., the heel 
Camill-US, i, m., Camilhis, (M. Furlua) 
Camp-US, 1, m., a level plain, ct field. 
Candld-UB, a, um, white; bright, shining. 

(Candeo.) 
C&n-is, is, m. or/, a dog. 
C&no, cCcIrl, cantum, can-Bra, to sing, 

to play (music) ; to prophesy. 
Cant-9, avi, atum, are, to sing. (Cano.) 
Cant-US, us, m., song, musical per/oim- 

ance. (Cano.) 
Can-US, a, um, fioary, grey, white: in 

pi., cani, grey hair. 
Capax, gen., c&pac-la, ac{;., capacious, 

spacious, roomy. 
Capell-a, ao, /., a she-goat. 
Caper, capri, m., a he-goat. 
Capess-0, Ivi, Itum, 6re, toeateh at, seite; 

take; undertake; take to: capesBere 

fupam, to take to flight, (Caplo.) 
C&pill-US, 1, m., a hair. 
Capio, cepl, captum, cap-Sre, to taikt, 

catch, capture; captivate; delight, enjoy. 
CEp!toli-TUn, i, n., the Capitol, or citadel 

of Rome, f Caput.) 
Capr-a, ae. /. Capra, (proper name.) 



" 



51 



196 



ULTIN TOCABULAIIY 



' 



I 



CaptW-*, (M^ /. (tfiitnah eaptivt, a itavt. 

(Capio.) 
Capt-0,»vl, atum, Rio, focatchattagerly: 

to alUntpt, trv. (Caplo.) 
Oapt-US, », uui, per/, part, of caplo. 
Caput, cAptt-ls, n., Vie hcaA; top; ch^f 

part 
Carcei , carc«r-l«, m., a priton. 
C&r-eO, ul, (Itum), Bre, to b€ witftout, to 

be in icant of, to need; to fail. 
Ciritas, carlUlt-ls,/., deamees, affection, 

love. 
Cannon, canntn-ls, n., a tang, poenu 
Ciro, cam-Is,/, A*'*. « P*"^' of flesh. 
Carpent-um, J, n., a clutriot, waggon. 
Carp-0, »i, turn, 6ro, to cull, gallur; 

pluck; tear; revile. 
CS,r-U8, a, um, dear, affectionate, much 

loved. 
C&B-a, ae,/, a hut, cottoije. 
CasO-US, ii n>., cheese. 
Cassi-US, 1, in., Cutsius, (proper tiame.) 
Castell-um, i, n., a fort. (Cttstra.) 
Castr-a, oran, n.pL,a camp. 
Cast-US, a, ura, chaste, pure. 
C&a-UB, us, m., an accident; mishap, mis- 
fortune, calamity. (Cado.) 
Caten-a, ae, /., a chain. 
Cathedr-a, ae,/., a seat, chair. 
Catilln-a, ae, m., CatiUne. 
C&tiil-UB, i, m., a puppy, whelp, cub. 

(Canls.) 
Caud-a, ae,/., a tail. 
CaUB-a, ae,/., a caftse, reasorn dbl. causft, 

for the sake of: mea causA, for my 

sake: dicere causam, to plead {in a 

court of law). 
Caut-UB, a, um, perf. part, of caveo, 

cautious, wary, 
C&veo, civi, cautum, cav-ere, to he on 

one's guard, take cart, 
Cavem-a, ae, /., a hole, hollow; cavern, 

den. (Cams.) 
C8.V-0, avi, atum, are, to hollow out. 
C&V-UB, a, um, hollow: m. and n. (used 

substantively), a hole, den, 
CedO, cessl, cessum, c5d-ere, to go, go 

away; to yield; retire from, 
CelSber (or Celebris), celebr-is, celebr-e, 

crowded; much frequented ; famous. 
Celer, cel6r-i8, celer-e, swift, quick, active, 
CSleriter, adv., quickly, speedily. 
Cel-0, &▼!, atum, are, to conceal, hide. 
Cels-UB, a, um, high, lofty, (all. 
CenB-eo, ui, um, ere, to be qf opinion; to 

ihittk; beHece; reckon. 



Cenior, cens«r-li, m., a emtor, (an 

ojficer at Home wfio watched over Iht 

morals of the people, and attended to the 

census-taking and other duties) ; a critte. 

(Censeo.) 
CeUB-UB, us, m., a census, or reckoning of 

the people, their property, <tc. (Censeo.) 
Centum, num. adj. (mdeclinable), ont 

hundred. 
Centfiri-a, ao, /., a century, or body of 

one hundred men; one of the sections 

into which Servius Tullius divided Ih I 

Roman people. (Centum.) 
CSr-a, ae,/, wax. 
Cerno,crevl,crClum,cern-«ro, towparart, 

distinguish; to see, perceive; determine. 
Cert&men, certamtn-ls, n., a coiUest, 

quarrel, struggle. (Certo.) 
Cert&tim, adv., emulously, with teal 

(Certo.) 
Certe, adv., really, surely, in truth, (Cer- 

tua) 
Cert-0, avl, atum, are, to strive, struggle, 

contend 
Cert-UB, a, um, sure, certain, fixed: fr- 

c6re aliquera certlorem, to certify one, to 

assure him. 
Cervix, cervlc-h, /, the neck; tfu nape o) 

the neck, 
Cerv-UB, 1, m., a stag, deer, 
Cetgr-i, ae, a, //*« rest, tlie others, (ran 

in the sing.) 
Chabri-as, ae, m., Chabrias, a famous 

Athenian general, (about B.C. 380.) 
Cih-UB, i, m.,food. 
CIcSrO, Ciceron-is, m., Cicero, a celebrated 

Roman orator and statesman. 
Cic6ni-a, ae,/, a stork. 
Circa, prep., about, around, (governs 

aceus.f Sometimes used as adv, 
Circlter, prep, and adv., about, near; 

about, nearly (in the sense of almost.) 
Circum, prep, and adv., around, about, 

(governs accus.) 

Circumar-0, avl, atum, are, to piouph 

rouncL (Circum, aro.) 
Circumdo, circumdSdi, clrcumdatnm, 

circumd-are, to put round, to surround. 

(Circum, do.) 
CircumstO, clrcumstltl, (see sto,) to 

stand round, encompass. 
Circ-US, 1, m., a hoop, ring, a ehxus. 
Cltat-US, a, um, perf. part, of clta 
CitiuB, adv., more quickly. 
CitO, adv., qmckly; compar., cltina; sup. 

citiasime. 



r^TIN VOOABirLAKY. 



197 



0!t-0, «vl, Itum, Irn, to $Hr up; liMten; 
call, tumituM. (FroqueiiUtivc, from 
cleo.) 

CIt-Ui, 8, uiti, ptrf. part, of cTflo, civl, 

citnin, ciere, to $tir up; to call, tummm. 
CIv-is, Is, m. or/., a ciluen. 
Clvltaa, clviirit-ls, /, cUUtnthip ; the 

itate; city. (CIvls.) 
Cl&d-es, Is, /, dUatttr, min,forlune ; dt- 

feat; tlaughter. 
Climlt-O, ftvl, atum, Bro, to thout out 
frtquently, or with tamettimt; to baicl. 

(Clamo.) 
Cl&m-O, ftvl, fttum, ftro, to cry aloud, call, 

thout; declare. 
Cl&mor, clain0r-l9, m., a shout, cry. 

(Clamo.) 

Clandestln-Ui, a, nm, secret, underhand, 

clandestine. (Glum, secretly.) 
Clangor, cliinKOr-ls, m., a noise, {like 
the flapping of wings ; mixed sound of 
mttsical instrutnents, Ac.) 
ClSr-US, a, urn, clear, bright; beautiful; 

famous. 
Class-ia, is, /., a division of the people; 

a fleet. 
Claudi-U8, 1, m., Claudius (Appius, one 
of the Decemviri): also, Marcus Claudius. 
Claud-O, cluus-l, claus-um, claud-6re, to 
shut, close; conclude, finish. 
■ Claus-us, a, um, perf. part, o/claudo. 
Cllens, cllent-ls, m. or /., a client; re- 
tainer, dependant. (Cluco, to hear.) 
Clltell-ae, amm, /. pi, a pack-saddle; 

panniers. 
Cloeli-a, ae,/, Cloelia. {See R. 11., 10.) 
Clusin-i, orum, m. pi, the people of 

Clusium. 
ClUsi-um, i, «., Clusium, the city qf Lars 

Porsena, on the Clanis. 
Coact-US, perf. part, of cogo, forced, 

compelled. 
Codes, coclU-ls, m., one blind of an eye: 

as proper name. Codes (Horatius.) 
Coelest-is, is, e, heavenly, divine. (Coel- 
um.) 

Coei-um,i, r.., heavtn; the sky. (Old farm 

of sing, is coehis, 1, m., with pi coeli.) 
Coen-a, ae, /, dinner, supper: a coona, 

after supper. 
Coen-0, avi, atnirij are, to dine,\sup. 
Coep-i, isse, (seep. 95,) to begiti 
Coerc-eo, ul, Itum, gre, to restrain. 

(Con, areeo.) 
CSgitatio, cojfitatlOn-is, f., a thought, 

rif.ection, deliberation. | 



C5gIt-0, ivi, lluni, tro, to Ihmi, [Hinder, 

reflect. 

Cognlt-Ut, a, um, known, (perf. part. <ff 

PfiKilOftco,) 

Cogndmen, cognomin-ls, n., a surname. 
(Con, nomen.) 

Cognoaco, cojfnOvl, coimUam, coKHOKC. 
Cro, to know thoroughl'i; perceive, un- 
derstand, recognise. (Con, nosco.) 

C5g0, coCrI, coactum, cohere, to force, 
compel; colUxl. (Con, axo.) 

Coll&ti-a, ao,/., Coltatia, name of a tmcu, 

Coliatln-ua, I, m., Collatinus, (protKr 
name.) 

Collat-aa, a, um, collected, (petfi part, 

o/c(iiifero.) 
CoUect-lls, a, um, perf. part, of co^Utfo. 
Colleg-a, ao, m. or/., a colleague. (Con, 

IfiRo, to choose.) 
Collig-o,colieK-l, colloctum, colliffSra, to 
collect, bring together; gain, f Co;), logo.) 
CoU-ia, Is, m., a hill 
CoUSquor, collocQtus sum, collOquI, to 

converse with. (Con, loquor.) 
Coll-um, I, a, the neck. 
Col-O, ul, cultum, col-Cre, to cultivate, 
worship; prartise: cOlero rem mill, 
tarem, to practise the art of war. 
Color, cOlOr-is, m., colour, aspect. 
C61ubr-a, ae, /, a snake. 
C51umb-a, ae,/, a do re, pigeon. 
Column-a, ae,/, apHlar, column. 
C6m-a, ae,/, hair; a head of hair. 
Comed-0, comCd-l, comesum, or comes- 
tum, comfidere, or comesse, to eat up, 
devour. (Con, edo.) 
CSmSa, comlt-Is, m. or /., a companion. 

(Con and stem o/eo, to go.) 
C5mlti-ain, i, n., the Comitium, or place 
where the assemblies of the Roman 
people met. (Con and stem of eo.) 

ComSmm5r-o, avi, .turn, fire, to call to 

mind, remtmber; relate, mention. (Con, 

mcmoro.) 
Commigr-0, avi, atum, are, to remove 

in a body, migrate. (Con, mlgro.) 
Committ-O, commia-i, connnissum, 

committCre, to join together, unite; 

commit, intrust, cause: committere 

praeUum, to join battle. (Con, mitto.) 
Commi-U8,i, m., Commius (proper name.) 
Commoveo, commovl, comu:6tum, cora- 

mSv-ere, to move with violence ; to sluxkt. 

(Con, raoveo.) 
Commlln-ia, is, e. common, public 

(Con, nittnus, or mania.) 



it ; I* 



li 

ill 



198 



LATIN VOCABULAllY. 



Commftniter, mie., in common; com- 
monly. (CoinmuniB.) 

Commtit-O, ftvi, atum, are, to change; 
exc/ianye; alter. (Con, iDutu.) 

C5m5B-V.3, a, urn, hairy. (Coma.) 

Compar, comp^r-ij, adj., eqital; a 
match; Me. (Con, par.) 

Compir-O, avi, atum, are, 'o put to- 
gether; compare; provid'^; procure. 
(Con, paro.) 

Compello, compttll, compulsum, com- 
yell-6re, to dri''e together; compel; press. 
(Cou pello.) 

Conipesc-O, jH, 6re, to check, restrain, 
control 

Complector, complexus sum, com- 
plect), (ttep..'* to embrace, encompass, 
(Con, and ro ,c plec , ic/old.) 

Compl-eo, Svi, gtum, 5ie, to fill up; 
finish. (Con, pleo.) 

Complez-US, a, um, per/, part, of com- 
plector. 

ComplfLr-es, es, a, adj.pl., several; very 
many. (Con, plus.) 

CompositO, adv., designedly: ex com- 
poaito, as agreed ot^ (Compositus.) 

Comprehend-O, i, (n)8um, 6re. to seize, 
catch; apprehend. (Cou, prehen'lo.) 

Coxaprena-US, a, ura, (/w comprehens- 
U8,) per/, part, o/comprehendo to catch. 

Com'^uls-US, a, um, per/, part. 0/ com- 
pello. 

CompungO, compunxi, compunctum, 
compung-6re, to sting, prick, (Con, 
pungo.) 

Con, used in compoutid words /or cum. 

Couoieo, conc'vi, concltum, conci-ere, 
to urge, rouse, exdtt, quicken. (Cou, 
cieo.) 

Concili-O, avi, atum, are, to unite; con- 
ciliate, reconcile; secure. (Concilium.) 

ConcillTl-O, avi, atum, are, to Join to- 
gether; ac^tiist ; devise, contrive. (Con- 
cinnus.) 

Con^.io, conciOn-is, /., an assembly. 

Concipio, concSpi, conceptum, concip- 
6re, iO tuKC up, co;;rr:vc, think 0/; under- 
stand. (Con, capio.) 

Conclt-O, avi, atuii, fire, to stir up, 

excite, rouse, hasten or.. (Con, cieo.) 
ConcIt-US, «^ um, per/, part. 6/ con- 

cieo, roused, quickened, <tc 
Conclam-O, avi, atum, are, '0 shout out 
together; encourage; cali on. (Con, 
clAimi.) 
C0UC04,U0, coucuxi, cuucoctum, cuu- 



c8qu-6re, to boil togeiher; to digat 
(Con, coquo.) 
Concordi-a, ae, /., harmony, concord. 

(Con, and cor, the heart.) 

Concurr-O, i, concur-sum, concurr-Cre, 

to run together; to fight. (Con, curro.) 

ConCUrs-US, ns, m., a running together; 

a concourse, assembly ; encounter. (Cou- 

curro.) 
Condicio, (or conditio,) condiciCn-ls, /., 

a condition, state, agreement; terms. 

(Condo.) 
Condltor, condltOr-is, m., a /ourukr, 

builder. (Condo.) 
Condlt-US, a, um, per/, part. 0/ condo 
Cond-O, Idi, itum, {re, to put together, 

/ound, build; hide. (Con, do.) 
Confect-US, a, um, pet/, part. 0/ con- 

flcio, toasted, worn out, itc 
Conf 8r-0, contill-i, collat-um, confer-re, 

to bring together, collect; compare: con- 
feree se, to betake one's set/. (Con, fero.) 
Confert-UJ, a, um, par\,. and adj., 

closely packed together, crowded. (Cor.- 

feieio.) 
Conficio, confeci, confectum, confic- 

gre, to put an end to, finish; slay. 

(Con, facio.) 
Conflagr-0, avi, atum, are, to biate u^ 

bum up ; set fire to. (Con, flagro.) 
ConflIg-0, coiifllx-i, eonflict-um, con- 

flig-6re, to dcuh together; Jighi. (Con, 

fligo.) _ 
Confod-io, confod-i, confos!)-um, con- 

fod-6re, to dig into ; stab, kilL (Coii, 

fodio.) 
Confug-io, confug-I, confQgit-nm, con- 

fug-Cre, toflee/orre/uge; have recourse 

to. (Con, fugio.) 
Congerrh, congess-i, congest-um, con- 

g6r-6re, to carry together, heap up, col- 
lect, amass. (Con, gero.) 
Conjicio, conjgc-i, conject-um, conjic- 

Sre, to throm together; Iturl, dash. 

(Con, jacio.) 
Conjung-0, conjunx-i, conjunct-um, 

conjung-6re, to join together, unite. 

(Con, jungo.) 
Conjur-O, avi, atum, are, to swear toge- 
ther, conspire, join by oath. (Con, juro.) 
Conjuz, conjflg-is, m. or/., spouse, yoke- 

/ellow; husband, w\fe. (Conjungo.) 
Connubi-um, i, »., mamage. (Con, 

nCibo.) 
Conor, cdnatus sum, cOnaii, (dep. I,) to 

try, ef»itav<jur. 



LATIN VOCABULAKY. 



199 



ConquiSror, conquestiu sum, conqui<r-t, 

(dtp. 3,) to eotnpkiin qfi lament. (Con, 

qu6ror.) 
Consciso-0, consciv-l, consclt-utn, con- 

Bclsc-fire, to vote together with; approve; 

decree: hence the phrase, Consclvlt 

mortem «lbi, he killed hinuelf. (Con, 

scisco, to vule.) 
Gonsci-ns, a, am, '..onsciouB, privy to. 
Conscrlb-O, conscrlps-i, conscript-uin, 

conscrtb-Sre, to enroll, levy; to compose. 

(Cor, scribo.) 
C ^naecr-O, avl, atut , are, to consecrate, 

devote. (Con, sacro.) 
Consens-US, us, m., unanimity, agree- 
ment, (Consentlo.) 
ConsSquor, consecutus sum, consequ-i, 

(dep. 3,) to come up with, overtake, gain. 

(Con, sequor.) 
Consero, consem-l, consert-um, con- 

sfir-fire, to tie iigether, bind: conserere 

msnum. io fight hand to hand: con- 
serere pugnam, to fight. 
ConsideO, consSdl, conscssum, con- 

8ld-8re to sit together; tit down, (Cou, 

sideo.) 
Consider-0, avi, atum, are, to consider; 

examine. 
CocsUi-um, !, n., counsel, advice. 
Consisto, constiti, constitum, conststere, 

to halt, settle, stand still. (Con, sisto.) 
Consol-or, fitus sum, &ri, (c/e/). 1,) to 

console, cony^'t. 
Conspect-US, us, m., a sight, view. 

(Conspicio.) 
Consplcio, conspex-l, conspect-Um, 

conspic-fire, to behold, see. (Con, 

specie. ) 
Consplo-Or, fttus sum, SrI, {dep. 1,) to 

observe, behold. (Conspicia) 
COUSp&U-aS, a, urn, evident, conspicu- 
ous. (Consplcio.) 
Conspir-O, flvl, atum, (Ire, to conspire. 

(Con, spiro.) 
Constanti-a, ae, /., firmness, endurance; 

steat^astnets (of purpose, Ac.) (Con- 

stans.) 
Constern-O, avi, atum, are, to terrify. 
Constiti, per/, of consisto. 
ConstltU-O, 1, turn, ere, to let up, estab- 

lish, arrange. (Con, statue.) 
Const-O, Itl, atum (or Itum), are, to 
stand fimi, be established; to last. (Con, 
sto.) 
Consuetflido, consuetudln-is, /., custom, 
habit, (Coit&Us.MXx'' 



Consul, consfil-ls, m., a con^tiL 
Consulat-ns, us, m., the consulship. 
Cousul-0, ui, tum, ere, to advise or con- 
sult (for the good of anotfier), with dsit; 
to ask advice (of another), with tlie 
accus. 
Consumo, consumpsi, consuinptum, 
consum-6re, to waste, consume, spend, 
(Con, sumo.) 
Consumpt-US, a, um, perf, part oj 

consum-o. 

Conteg-0, contex-i, contec-tum, conteg- 

6re, to cover up, cor.ceal. (Con, tego.) 

Contemn-O, contemps-i, conteiupt-uin, 

contemn-fire, to despise, scorn. (Con, 

tern no.) 

Contempt-US, a, um, perf. part, o/con- 

tenino, despised, 
Contend-O, i, content-um, contend-5re, 
to strive for, fight; to liasten toward ; to 
assert. (Con, tendo.) 
Contentio, contentiOn-is, /., exertion, 

effor*; strife. (Contendo.) 
Content-US, a, um, perf. part, of con- 
tendo, and adj., strained, stretclied. 
Contcnt-US, a, um, perf. part, of con- 
tineo, held in, checked, restrained; satis- 
fied, 
Conterr-eo, u^ Itum, ere, to terrify, 

affright. (Con, terreo.) 
Contin-eo, ui, content-nm, coutin-5re, 
to hold in, check, restrain, (Cou, 
teneo.) 
Contingit, impers., (3d sing, of con- 
tin go,) it happens, falls to one's lot, 
ContingO, conttg-i, contact-um, con- 
ting-fire, to totu^, . «ucA; happen, (Con, 
tango.) 
ContlnuO, adv., immediately, forthwith. 
Control pi'ep. with accus., against ; over 
against: adv., opposite, on the ot/ier 
hand ; in reply. 
Contract-US, a, um, perf. part, of con- 

tralin. 
Contr&h-O, contrax-i, contrac-tuni,- 
contrah-fire, to draw together, contract; 
assemble. (Con, traho.) 
ConttibeFni-um, i, n., residence to- 
gether in a tent ; companionship ; so- 
ciety; neighbourfiood. (Con, taberna.) 
ContiimaZ, gen., contumSc^is, adj., 
puffed up; haughty, insolent. (Con, 
tumeo. 
ContHmeli-a, ae, /., an insult, haugMf, 
treatment, an affront, disifrace. (Cun, 

tlUUttOv) 



200 



LATIN VOCABULAKV. 



Conv&lesoo, conval-ul, conralesc-Sre, 

to regain strength, grmo tceU. (Con, 

valeo.) 
Conven-io, i, turn, ire, to come together, 

assemble ; agree ; suit. (Con, venio.) 
Convert-O, l, convers-um, convert-6re, 

to turn round, change, alter. 
Convioi-um, i, n., a brawling noise; 

a reproach, abuse. 
Convict-US, us, m., a living with, con- 
sorting with; intercourse. (Con, vivo. ) 
Ccnviv-a, ae, m. or/., a gu^st. 
Convivi-um, i, n., a feast, banquet. 

(Con, vivo.) 
ConvSc-O, avi, fitum, &re, to call toge- 
ther, convoke, assemble. (Con, voce.) 
Coorior, cooitus sum, cooilri, (rfep.,) to 

rise up, arise. (Con, orior.) 
C5pi-a, ae, /, plenty, abundance: in pi, 

copiae, /orcM, troops. 
C5pi0S-US, a, um, plentiful, abundant, 

well supplied. (Copia.) 
C5r, cord-is, n., the heart 
CSram, prep, tdth cU>l., b^ore, in presence 

of. 
C5rinth-as, i, /, Corinth, (a city of 

Oreece.) 
CSri-um, i, n., a hide, skin ; leather. 
Comeli-a, ae, /, Cornelia, (a female 

name.) 
Comix, cornlc-is, /, a crow. 
Comu, corn- us, n., a horn. 
Cordn-a, ae, /, a crown, chaplet, wreath. 
Corpus, corpOr-is, a, a body, corpse: 

vasti coi-poris, qf huge size. 
Corrept-US, a, um, perf. part. <tf cor- 

ripio. 
Corrip-io, ul, correptum, corrlp-gre, to 

seize hastily, lay hold, snatch, carry off. 

(Con, rapio.) 
Corrod-O, eorrOs-i, con-6s-um, corrdd- 
• ere. to gnaw in pieces, devour. (Con, 

rodo.) 
Corrump-O, con-up-i, comip-tum, cor- 

rump-fire, to break up, spoil, deitroy. 

(Con, rumpo.) 
Corrupt-US, a, um, perf. part, qf cor- 

rnmpo. 
Corv-US, }, m., a raven, 
Cos, c5t-is,/., a Khetslone. 
Cr&B, adv., to-morrow; in time to come. 
Crass-US, i, m., Crassus, (a Roman 

name.) 
Cred-0, Idl, Ttum, ere, to believe, trust to. 
Crediintas, creduUt&t-is, /., readiness to 

belicix, crtdwiiy. (Credulu^; 



Cre-0, ftvi, atum, are, to create ; beget ; 
make; elect. 

CrSpit-US, us, m., a crash ; harsh noise. 
(Crepo.) 

CrSpusC^l-um, i, n., evening twilight: 
(the morning twiliglU, diluculum.) 

Cresco, crgvl, cretum, cresc-ere, to grow, 
increase. (Creo.) 

Crimen, crimln-ls, n., a charge, accusa- 
tion; fault. 

Crlmic-or, atus sum, ari, {dep.,) to lay 
charges against, accuse. (Crimen.) 

Crin-is, is, m., Jiair. 

Cr5c5dIl-US, i, m., a crocodile, (some- 
times written corcodilus.) 

Crudel-is, is, e, savage, cruel, Itarsfi. 
(Crudus.) , 

Cruor, cruOr-is, m., blood, gore. 

Crus, crur-ls, n., a leg. 

Crux, cruc-is, /., a cross. 

Cubicul-um, i, n., a bed-chamber. 
(Cubo, to lie down.) 

Ctlbll-e, is, n., a bed; den; kennel; stye 
(Cubo.) 

Culp-a, ae, /., a fault, blame. 

Culter, cultr-i, 7ft., a knife. 

Cult-US, a, um, perf part, o/colo, culti- 
vated, worshipped, &c. 

Cult-US, us, m., culture, cultivation; 
treatment ; mode of life. (Colo.) 

Cum, prep, with abl, along witit, with; 
also as conj., when. (See quum.) 

Cum-ae, arum, /. pi., Cumae, a town in 
Campania, Italy. 

Cunct-or, atus, ari, (dep. l,) to delay, 
hesitate. 

Cunct-US, a, um, all, whole usually in 
pi., all. (Conjunctus.) 

Ciipidltas, cupldltat-is, /, desire, pas- 
sion, eagerness; appetite; greed. (Cu- 
pidus.) \ 

Cup!d-US, a, um, eager, desirmu, greedy. 
(Cupio.) 

Cup-io, ivi, itum, 6re, to covet, desire, 
wis?t. 

Cur, adv., why. 

Cur-a, ae, /., care, anxiety. 

Ciir-es, lum, /, Cures, a Sabine totcn. 

CHri-a, ae, /., a curia (a division of Jio- 
man people) ; senate house. 

Ctiriati-US, i, »»., Curiatius, (proper 
name.) 

Cur-O, avi, atum, are, to care for, taAc 
care of, see to, tend (Cura.) 

Curr-0, cucurr-i, cura-um, curr-ere, to 
rutt, ftwiieti. 



LATIxV VOCABULARY. 



201 



Carr<-Tll, ns, m., a carnage, vthicle, 
vxtggon, ear. (Cuno.) 

Cors-US, us, m., a running, race; course. 
(Curro.) 

Cfirul-is, Is, e, curtt^e ; lella curulis, the 
curule chair, on which chi^ magis- 
trates at Rome sat ; hence curulis ttas 
applied to thb higher ojfices. (Currus, 
or cuivus.) 

Curv-US, a, um, bent, crooked, curved. 



CastOS, cu8t8d-lg, m. or /, a guardian, 

keeper, guard. 
Ciit-is, ia,/., the skin. 
Cybeb-a, ao, /., Cybebe, a goddess, wife 

of Saturn. The name is also written, 

Cybibe, or Cybeia, or Cybile, or Cybile. 
Cycn-US, 1, m., a s\Dan: also proper 

name. 

Cypri-us, a, um, Cyprian; (Cyprlua 
vlcufl, the Cyprian street, in Rome.) 



D. 



Bamn-O, avi, atum, are, to condemn. 

(Damnum.) 
Damu-mn, l, n., loss, damage. 
Sap-B, or dap-ls, is, /, a banquet, feast. 

Often in pL, dapes, (but genitive not 

found.) 
De, prep, with abl, dou)nfirom;from; out 

of; concerning. 
De-a, ae, /., a goddess. 
Deb-eo, ui, Itum, Sre, to owe, be under 

an obligation. In the 3d pers. sint,'. It 

Is uspd impersonaUy,— cfe5e<, it ought, 

must, &c. 
Debll-is, is, e, weak, feeble, exhausted. 
Seced-O, decess-l, decess-um, deced-gre, 

to go away, depart; die. (De, cedo.) 
Dgcem, num. adj., (,indeelinable,) ten. 
Decept-US, a, um, deceived, outwitted; 

jperf.part. o/decipio.) 
Dec-et, decebat, decuit, &c., impers. 

verb, it becomes, it behoves, it is proper. 

(Seep. 97.) 

Dec!d-0, I, 6re, to /all down, drop; die. 

(De, cado.) 
D^cim-us, a, um, tenth. 
Declpi»0, dScSp-i, decept-um, decip-5re, 

to deceive, outmit, over-reach. (De, 

capio.) 

Decor, decSr-ls, m., beauty, grace, ele- 
gance. 

Dec5r-0, avi, atum, are, to beautify, 
adorn, set off. (Decus.) 

Dec6r-US, a, um, seemly, beautiful, fit- 
ting. (Decor.) 

Decurr-O, l, (or decucurrl,) dec;irsnm, 
decurr-ere, to run down; to have re- 
course to, (i.e., to run to.) (De, curro.) 

Decus, di^c6r-ls, n., beauty, grace, orna- 
ment, glory. 

Decut-io, decuss-i, decns8-um, decut- 
(Jre, to shake down; strikt (De, quji- 
Uo.) 



Dedgcus, d5d5c5r-l8, «., a disgrace, stain. 
DedltlO, deditlon-is,/, a giving up, sur- 
render. (D5do.) 
Ded-0, Idl, Itum. 6re, to giveup, surrender, 

abandon. (De, do.) 
Deduc-0, dedux-i, deduct-nm, deduc- 
ere, to lead down; conduct; bring; had 
off, withdraw. (De, duco.) 
Defect-US, a, um, worn out, exhausted; 
deprived of; deficient in; (per/, part. 
o/deflcio.) 
Defend-0, i, defensum, defend-6re, to 

keep off, repel, d^end; forbid. 
Deflr-0, detul-i, delat-um, defer-re, to 
carry down or off; conduct; report, 
accuse; intrust to. (De fero.) 
Defess~US, a, um, wearied; worn out; 

(perf. part, of defe.Kscor.) 

Defetiscor, (or delaiiscor), defessussum, 

defetisci, to grow wearied, be exhausted. 

(De, fatiscor.) 

DefXci-0, defec-i, defect-um, deflc-Sre, 

to faU; forsake, leave; revolt. (Defacio.) 

Deg-0, 1, gre, to spend time; live. (De, 

ago.) 
Dein, adv., then; next in order; after- 
wards. 

DeincepB, adv., then, in the next place, ' 

thereafter. 
Delude, adv., thereafter, next in order, 

then. (De, inde.) 
Dejici-0, dejec-l, dSject-um, d5jTc-6re, 

to throw down; cast out of (De, jacio.) 
Delect-0, avi, atum, are, to deliaht, give 

pleasure: delectat, impers., it dilighU. 
Delet-UB, a, um, perf part. o/*del-eo, 

obliterated, annihilated, destroyed. 
Del-eo, evl, stum, ere, to blot out, de 

stray. 
DeIlb-0, 5vi, Ac, to taste, enjoy. 

■nil*— - . . .. - " .' 

i;ciijj-a, avi, acum, are, to bind down, 
make firm, fasten. (De, llgo ) 



202 



LATIN VOCABULAKY. 




'jL)61Ig-0, del6g-l, deicct-um, dei1g-6re, 

to chooM out. uUct. (De, ICgo.) 
Delin.qu-0, deliqu-1, deilct-nm, dCllnqu- 
6ie, to fail, fall short; sin. (De, linqun.) 
Delir-U8 a, um, tUly, doting, half-wilted. 

(l)ClIro, and that from de, lira.) 
Delph-i, orum, m. pi., Delphi, a town of 
Phocis in Greece, with famous temple 
and orach. 
Delud-0, dsms-i, dSlfls-um, dCind-?re, 
to mock, laugh to scorn; disappoint. 
(De, ludo.) 
SelUB-US, a, uni, perf. part, of delude, 

bailed. 
Demens. ?«». dement-ls, a(y., mad, 

frantic! foolish. (De, mens.) 
Demigr-O, avi, atum, are, to wamler 
away ; to migrate, einujrate. (De, 
migro.) 
Sfimuin, adv., at length, at last. 
Dens, dent-is, «i., a tnuth. 
])eu8-l»S, a, um, close, crowded, dense, 

thick. 
Denild-0, avl, atum, are, tolaybare, make 
naked; expose; plunder. (Do, nudo.) 
Denunti-O, avl, atum, 5ie, to denounce; 
give fair warning ; declare, (De, nun- 
tio.) 
Dep5n-0, dSpSsu-l, depSslt-um, depon- 
6re, to lay down; nnburden one's self; 
bring forth. (De, pono.) 
Deprehend-O, (or deprendo), i, depre- 
hens-um, deprehend-6re, to catch in the 
act; surprise, detect; arrest. (De, pro- 
hendo.) 
DepresS-US, a, um, perf part, of deprl- 

mo, sunk. 
Deprimo, depress!, depressum, depilm- 
6re, to press down, lower, sink, (De, 
premo.) 
Derepo, derepsi, dereptum, d5r5p-gre, 

to creep down. (De, repo.) 
Derldeo, deris-l, derls-um, d5rld-5re, 
to laugh at, deride, mock. (De, rideo.) 
DerlSOr, derlsor-is, m,, a mocker, a scoffer. 

(Derideo.) 
I)§ris-U8, us, m., mockery, laughter, 

scoffing. (Derideo.) 
Sescend-O, i, descens-um, descend-Cre, 

to go down, descend. (De, scaiido ) 
Describ-O, descrips-l, descript-um, de- 
BcribCre, to write down; assign; describe. 
(De, scribo.) 
Dessr-O, ui, tum, ere. to de.'^ert, abandon. 
JjiiUvit-'Ha, a, um, per/, pari, ii,' dSscro, 
abcmdonid. 



Bfisldeo, desBd-i, destd-Cre, to lU dovnt 

sit idly ; loiter, lounge. (De, sCdea) 
DeSldSri-Um, l, «., « kinging detire; 
regret (for want of) ; neecL (Desidero.) 
DSsU-io, ul, desult-um, desil-Ire, to leap 

down. (De, salio.) 
Dgsin-0, desivi (desih, desit-nm, desin- 
6re, to leave off, cease, desist. (Do, 
sine.) 
DesistO, destlti, destltum, desist-Cre, 
to stand off; leave off, desist. (De, 
sisto.) 
Despect-ns, a, um, being despised, (perf. 

part, o/despicio.) 
Desp!ci-0, despex-l, despect-um, d5- 
8plc-6re, to look down on, despise. (De, 
spgcio.) 
Desum., deful, deesse, to be away; to 

be wanting, or deficient. (De, sum.) 
DetSr-0, deti1v-i, detiit-um, dCter-fire, 

to rub off, wear away. (De, tero.) 
Deterr-eo, ui, Itum, ere, to frighten 
away; deter; dishearten. (De, terreo.) 
Detest-or, atussmp, ari, (rfep. l,) to hate, 

abominate, 
Detrah-O, detrax-l, detract-um, detrah- 
6re, to drag or pull off; take away. 
(De, tralio.) 
Detrit-US, a, um, rubbed bare, (perf. 

part o/det6ro.) 
De-US, I, m., a god. (Seep. 15, note.) 
Deven-io, i, tum, ire, to come down; 

arrive; reach. (De, venio.) 
Dev6c-0, avi, atum, are, to call down; 

lead on, entice. (De, vOco.) 
Dev6r-0, avi, atum, are, to swallow 

greedily, devour, bolt. (De, voro.) 
DeXtr-a, ae, /., the right hand: fern, of 

adj. dexter, era (-ra), erum (-rum). 
Diall-a,'^ae, /, Diana, the goddess, sister 

of Apollo. 
DiC-0, dixi, dict-um, dlc-6r9^ to say, 

speak, tell, declare ; plead. 
Dictator, dictatOr-is, m., dictator, (a 
magistrate occasionally elected at Rome, 
luxving supreme power.y (Dicto.) 
Dictatflr-a, ae, /., the office of dictator, 

dictatorship. (Dictator.) 
Dict-um, i, n., a saying, report, ,word, 

command. (Dico.) 
Dict-US, a, um, per/, part. ()fdico. 
Dldici, perf. ind. act. 0/ disco, to learn. 
Dies, diei, m. or/, a day, time: in pi 
masc., days, $easons. 

T*:«'T-ri ia I. /. ,i,.Kj..,U /Wnrnnmniirl. 

X?iili\.Ji--ot ''^^ • 1 ••V"-'"'- \ r 

sun. Bee p. 37.) 



LATIN VOOABULAEY. 



203 



BigSr-O, dipcss-l, dl|re»t-nm, dlger-gro, 
to carry in difftrent dtrecttona; t/i(/«(. 
(Di, gero.) 
Dlglt-U8, 1, m., a finger. 
Dignitas, digmtat-is,/, worth; dignity, 

honour. (Dlgnus.) 
Dign-us, a, um, worthy, deterred, meet. 
DiUgens, gen. diligent-is, loving (one's 
work); diligent; cartful (Dillgo, to 
love.) 
Dillgenter, adv., car^ully; with dili- 
gence. (Dlligens.) 
Dimicatio, dimicatlOn-is, /., a contest, 

struggle, fight. (Dlmico.) 
Dimico, fivl, or ul, atum, 5re, to fight, 

struggle, contend. (Di, mico.) 
Dimitt-0, dimis-i, dimiss-um, dimltt- 
6re, to send awa^^ dismiss; let go; drop 
(Di, mitto.) 
Dionysi-US, 1, in., Bionysius, (proper 

name.) 
Cirigo, direx-I, dlrect-um, dirlg-6re, to 
set right; make straight ; arrange; di- 
rect, guide. (Di, rego.) 
Dirlp-io, ui, dlrept-utn, dirlp-Bre, to 
carry off, plunder, destroy. (Di, rap- 
_io.) 
Siru-0, 1, dirii-tuni, 6re, to pull down, 

destroy. (Di, ruo.) 
Disced-0, discess-i, discess-um, discSd- 
Sre, to go away, depart; separate. 
_(Dl,«do.) 
Liscera-O, dlscrSv-i, discretum, dis- 
cei-n-gro, to separate between, distiih- 
guish, point out. (Di, cerno.) 
Discipiil-U8, i, m., a learner, pupil, 

disciple. (Disco.) 
Disb-0, didlc-i, disc-6re, to learn. 
Discordi-a, ae, /., alienation of heart; 

discord, disagreement. (Discordo.) 
DisCOrd-0, avl, atum, are, to disagree. 

(Di, cor.) 
Dispar, gen. dispSr-is, not a match, un- 
equal, unlike. (Di, par.) 
Dissimil-is, is, e, WilUe, dissimilar. 

(Di, similis.) 
Dissimul-0, ari, atutn, are. to conceal 

thejruth, dissemble. (Di, « ', .-o.) 
Diss61ut-US, ?., um, per/, par., of dis- 
Bolvoj as a^., abandoned, dissolute, 
licentious. 
Dissolv-O, 1, diisdlQtum, dissolv-5re, to 

break up, dissolve (Di, solvo.) 
Distr&h-O, distrax-i, dlatract-um, dls- 
iraii-ere, to tear asunder, separate; dis- 
tract, perplez. (Di, tralio.) 



Dl8trIbu-0, I, turn, ere, to divide, dii- 

tribute. (Di, tribuo.) 
Diu, adv., for a long time. 
Diutius, adv., (compar. of dlu), longtri 

(superL diutissime.) 
DiQtum-UB, a, um, of long continuance, 

protracted, tasting. (Diu.) 
Divers-US, a, um, different, vaHed, 

Jfjif- part, o/dlverto.) 
Dives, gen. divlt-is, a<^., rich ; compar 
divitior, or ditior; superl. divitissiums, 
or ditissimus. 
Divid-0, divis-l, divis-um, divld-ere, to 

divide, separate. (Di, video ) 
Divinit-U8, adv., divinely, by divine di- 
rection. (Divinus.) 
Divin-US, a, um, belonging to a god; 

divine, heavenly. (Divus.) 
Divitiac-US, i, m., DivUiacus, a chief of 

the j£dui, a Gallic tribe. 
Diviti-ae, arum, /. pi., riches, wealth, 

resources. (Dives.) 
DiV-U8, i, m., a god, a deity. 
Do, dedi, datum, dare, to give, bestoic: 
dare poenas, to suffer punishment: 
dare loto, to put to death. 
D6c-eo, ui, turn, gre, to teach, show, 

inform, tell. 
DScil-is, is, e, easily taught, quick in 

perception, docile, (Doceo.) 
D0Ct-U8, a, um, taught, learned; (perf 

part, o/ doceo.) 
D6cument-um, 1, n., lesson, example; 
proof illustration; warning. (Doceo.) 
D61-eo, ui, Itum, 6re, to feel pain; to 

grieve, lament. (Dolor.) 
D61o, 0- dolon, dolOn-is, m., a staff uith 

sharp iron point; a sting. 
D61-0, avi, atum, are, to hew ; to bela- 
bour, cudgel. 
DSlor, dolor-is, m., pain, grief, sorrow. 
Dolose, adv., crqftily, slyly, deceitfully, 

(DolOsus.) 
Ddlos-US, a, um, crqfly. (Dolus.) 
Dol-US,i, m., adevice, trick; guile, fraud, 

deceit. 
Domi, gen. of domus, (wed adverbially,) 

at liome. 
Domicili-um, i, n., a house, abode, 

lodging, domicile. (Domus.) 
DSmin-a, ae, /., « mistress, owner, 
Domin-UB, i, m., a master, owner, lord 
JDomus.) (<Se«! magister.) 

-7 — . — 1 — *^ -.* ..»«"*(-c.j Cvn*lttztf 

tame. 
Dom-US, Qs, /., ahouse, home, (Stip. 3G.; 




304 



LATIN VOCABULARY. 



DSneo, adv. or cot\f., until. 

D5ll-0, &vi, atuin, ire, to ffive a gift; to 

bestow. (Donuir ) 
Don-um, i, n., a g\fX, present. 
Dorm-io, ivi, Uum, ire, to sleep. 
Oors-um, i, n., a back; ridge (of a hill, 

road, <bc.) 
I)5s, dSt-ls, /, a gift, dowry ; a gift of 

nature, an endowment. (Do.) 
Dubit-0, avi, atum, are, to doubt, heii- 
. tati. (Dubius.) 
Dubi-UB, a, um, doubfful, not ea*ily 

settled; undecided. (Duo, two, and old 

verb, blto, to go.) 
Dficent-i, ao, a, two hundred. (Duo, 

centum.) 



DflO-O, dux-i, duct-uni, dflcere, to lead, 
guide; think, suppose: dunere uxorem, 
to marry a wife, (Dux.) 

Dulc-is, is, e, sweet, pleasant, agreeable. 

Dunfi', cor0. or adv., fohilst. 

Dumnorix, Dumn6rlg-is, m., Dumnorix, 
an Jiduan chief. 

Duo, ao, 0, {.card, num.,) two. (iSee 
p. 39.) 

DuodScim, (card, num.,) twelve. 

Dupllo-O, avi, atum, are, to make two- 
fold, double; enlarge. (Duplex.) 

Dtir-US, a, um, hard, harsh 

Dux, dQc-is, m. or /., a leader, guiJi, 
commander. 



E, or ex, prep, with abl, out of, from, E is 

used before consonants, and ex before 

vowels. 
£blb-0, 1, Uum, 6re, to drink up, drain, 

(E, bibo.) 
EbUT, fibOr-is, n., ivory, 
Eburne-US, a, um, made of ivory. 

(Ebur.) 
Ecce, intetj., lol behold! look here I 
£d-0, 5di, 6sum, 6d6re, to eat, consume, 
£d-0, idi, Uum, 6re, to give forth, utter, 

publish, proclaim, (E, do.) 
Educ-0, Sduxi, educt-um, 6duc-6ra to 

lead forth, (E, duco.) 
EduC-0, avi, atum, are. to bring up, edu- 
cate, train, 
Effect-US, us, m., result, effect, issue: 

s'Mcess, (Efflcio.) 
Effiro, extttl-i, elatum, efferre, to carry 

forth; to bring out, publish; save, (E, 

fero.) 
Effigi-es, 6i, /•, an image, likeness. (E, 

fingo.) 
Eifug-io, i, Uum, 6re, to escape, avoid. 

(E, fugio.) 
£ffugi-um, i, n., escape, rescue, (EfFu- 

pio.) 
Effund-O, etfudi, effflsum, effundfire, to 

pour forth, gush out; lavish. (E, fuiido.) 
£ffuB-US, a, um, perf. part, of effundo. 

spread abroad. 
Egens, gen, ggent-is, acif,, poor, needy , 

(part.pret. w/egeo.) 
Eg-vO, 3i, Sre, to bi m need, to want, to 

be poor. 



Ego, niel, /, (first pers. pron.,—on which 
see p. 41.) 

EgrSdior, egressus sum, egrgdl, (dtp, 
3,) to go forth, depart, (E, gradior.) 

EgrSgi-US, a, um, extraordinary; ex- 
cellent; conspicuous. (E, grex.) 

Ejici-0, ejgc-i, eject-um, ejlcSre, to cast 
out, throw forth, banish. (E, jacio.) 

Elabor, elapsns sura, elabi, (dep, 3,) ta 
glide forth, slip away, escape, (E, labor.) 

£lapS-US, a, \xm, petf, part. o/5)ubor. 

Elat-US, a, um, perf. part, of effero. 

Eleganti-a, ae,/, neatness qf dress, ele- 
gance, grace. (Elegans.) 

Ellv-0, avi, atum, are, to lift up, raise; 
make light; make light qf, disparage. 
(E, 16vo.) 

ElIg-0, §16gi, electum, ellggre, to choose, 
select, elect. (E, 16go.) 

Eloquens, gen. eloquent-is, part, o/elo- 
quor; also, a^j., eloqueht, speaking well 
(out.) 

Elud-0, elfis-i, elusum, 61ud-6re, to es- 
cape from ; mock ; elude, baffle. (E, 
ludo.) 

Emin-eo, ul, ere, to tower upward, bt. 
raised high, be conspicuous. (E, niineo; 
see immineo.) 

Emitt-0, emis-i, emiss-um, emitt-Cre, 
to send forth ; let fall, drop. (E, mitto.) 

EmSrior, Bmortuussum, emOri, (dep. 3,) 
to die outright, to die. (E, morior.) 

Eu, intetyec., lot behold I 

Sullil, 'OTfj., for, = ort4 thi reoscfi if 

Ens-is, is, m., a sword. 



LATIN VOCABULARY. 



Eo, Ivl, ttum, Ire, to go. (See p. 82.) 
Eo, adv., to that place, thither: also, 
there. 

Ephgsi-U8, a, urn, of Ephem; (applied 
to Diana.) 

Epi8t61-a, ae, /, a Utter, epistle, dj- 
tpatch. 

EquSs, equTt-is, m., a horseman; a knight. 

(Eqiius.) 
Equester, (or equestr-i8,)i9, e, equestrian, 

belonging to a horseman, or to cavalry. 

(Eques.) 
Equidem, adv., indeed, I for my part. 

(Ejfo, quidera.) 

Equitat-U8, as, m., cavalry, fu>rse sol- 
diers. (Equito.) 
Equ!t-0, avi, atum, are, to ride. (Eques.) 
Erect-US, a, um, raised up, erect: erecta 
expectatione, expectation being on tip. 
toe, (per/, part, of erigo.) 
Erga, prep, with accus., towards. 
Er^O, adv., thertfore, accordingly. 
Erig-0, erex-i, erect-um, Srlg-6re, to set 

up, raise ; encourage. (E, rego.) 
Erip-io, ul, erept-um, mp-Sre, to snatch 

away; drag from, rescue. (E, rapio.) 
Eriid-io, Ivl, Itum, ire, to cultivate, poU 

ish; educate, instruct. (E, rudis.) 
Erumpo, Srtipi, eruptum, 6rump-6re, 

to burst forth, sally forth. (E, rumpo.) j 
Esc-a, ae, /., food; a bait. (Mo, 

gs-um.) 
Escend-0, l, escens-um, escend-6re, to 

climb up, mount. (E, scando.) 
Esquilin-US, i, m., the EsquiUne hill at 

Rome. 
Esur-io, M, itum, ire, to desire to eat; 

be hungry. ( Edo, es-um.) 
Et, co>y., and: et— et, both— and: adv., 

also. 
Etiam, conj., also, and also ; adv., also, 

even. 
Etruri-a, ae,/., Etruria, part of Italy. 
Etrusc-i, orum, m., the Etrurians. 
Evad-0, ovas-i, evas-um, evad-6re, to go 

forth, escape. (E, vado.) 
Evagat-US, petf. part. o/evSgor. 
Evagor, evagStus sum, evagari, to wan- 
der forth. (E, vagor.) 
Evell-0, evelli (or evalsi), evuls-um, 
evell-gre, to pluck out, pull out. (E, 
vello.) 

Event-US, us, m., an event, issue, result. 
(Evenio.) 

Ev8rt-0, i, evers-um, 6vert-ere, to over- 
turn. (E, verto.) 



205 



Ev5c-o, avI, atum, are, to call otit, mm. 

mon. (E, TOCO.) 
Ex, prep, with abl, out of. (Set E.) 
Exactor, exactOr-ls, m., on overseer; 

collector; exactor. (ExTgo.) 
Excell-0, ui, excels-um, excell-gre, to bt 

eminent; to surpass, exceed, excel. (Ex, 

cello.) 
Excio, exclvl (excil), excitnm, excire, 

(part., excltus, or excltus), to call forth, 

rouse, excite. (Ex, clo, or cleo.) 
Excipi-o, except, except-um, exclp-Cre, 

to take in suceesswn, to follow, succeed; 

catch. (Ex, capio.) 

ExcItat-US, a, um, perf. part, of ex- 
cTto. 

ExcIt-0, avi, atum, are, to rouse hastily; 

caU forth; e.xcite. (Ex, clto.) 
Excitus, (or excitus), perf part, of 

excio. 

Exempl-um, I, n., an example, an illus- 
tration, instance; fable. 

Exeo, exli, exitura, exire, to go forth, 
depart (Ex, eo.) 

Exerc-eo, ui, itum, gre, to exercise, prac. 
tise, employ. (Ex, arceo.) 

ExercIt-US, as m., an army. (Ex- 
erceo.) 

Exhib-eo, ui, itum, gre, to hold forth, 
exhibit, show; make proof of. (Ex, 
habeo.) 

ExigO, exegl, exactum. exig-Sre, to 
drive out; tc spend; pass time; to ex- 
act. (Ex, ago.) 

Exili-um, (or exsiUum), I n., exile, 
banishment. (Exul.) 

Existim-O, avi, atum, ars, to esteem, 
value ; consider. (Ex, aestimo.) 

Exiti-um, i, n., destruction. (Exeo.) 

Exit-US, us, m., departure; issue, end. 
(Exeo.) 

Exorior, exortus sum, exoriri, (dep. 3,\ 
to rise out of, to arise; begin. (Ex, 
orior.) 

Exorn-0, ari, atum, are, to adorn, equip, 
ornament. (Ex, orno.) 

Exor-0, avi, atum, are, to obtain by en- 
treaty ; to beg earnestly. (Ex, oro.) 

Expectatio, (or exspectatio), expecta- 
ti5n-i8,/, expectation. (Expecto.^ 

Expect-0, avi, atum, are, to wait for, 
expect. 

Expgd-io, Ivi, Itum, ire, to set _free, re- 
move obstructions, extricate: get ready i 
•explain: expgdit, impers., it is profit- 
able. CEx, a«<f pes, pedis.) 



206 



LATIN VOCABULAEY. 



Ezpello, expHll, expnl»-um, expell-Bre, 
to drive out, expel, banith. (Ex, pello.) 
ExpJIriinen-tum, 1. n , a trial, tat, ex- 
periment, (Experior.) 
ExpSrior, cxpertas sum, exper-lrl, (dt-p. 
4.) *) try, experience. (From root perl-, 
totrv, a* found in perl-tua, peri-culum, 
Ac.) 
Expera, ««»•, expert.i», a(l}., without 
a share of, devoid of, dettituU of. (Ex, 
pars.) 
Expllc-O, avl or ul, atnin, or Itum, Rre, 
to unravel, unfold; nui.ie plain; expand. 
(Ex, pUco.) 
Expl5rat-US, a, um, perf part, qf ex- 
plore. 
Ezpl5r-0, avl, stum, are, {to cry aloud,) 
to search out, examine, reconnoitre, ex- 
plore. (Ex, ploro.) 
Expdno, exp68U-i, expestt-uni, expfin- 
6re, to set forth, put forth, expose, nutke 
known, display. (Ex, pono.) 
ExpOSCO, expOposcl, exposc-Sre, to de- 
mand eagerly, implore, entreat. (Ex, 
posco.) 
ExpSsit-US, «, um, perf. part, of ex- 

pOno. 
Expugn-O, avl, atum, are, to take by 

storm, storm, capture. (Ex, pugno.) 
ExpulB-UB, a, um, perf. part, qf ex- 

pello. 
Exsgr-O, ui, turn, 6re, to thrust forth ; set 
forth plainly; show; prove. (Ex, sero.) 
Exsili-um. (See Exlllum.) 
Exspect-0, avl, atum, are, to look for, 
expect, await. (Ex, specto.) 



Exiplr-O, avl, Rtnm, Rr«, to IrtatW^tf*: 

expire, die. (Ex, splro.) 
EzBtinot-UB, a, um, (orextlnctut,) per/ 

part, of exillnguo. 
ExstingUO, (or extlncno,) exstlnxl, ex- 
Btlnctum, exstlngu-Sre, to blot out, put 
out, extinguish, destroy: exstlnctuB mor- 
bo, having died of disease. (Ex, tlnguo.) 
Exsul. (SeeExul.) 
ExBul-0. (See Exulo.) 
EXBUlt-0, avl, atum, are, to bound forth, 

leapvp; exult; rejoice. (Ex»lllo.) 
Ext-a, orum, a pi, the entrails, (heart, 

lungs, liver.) 
Exterr-eo, ul, ttum, ere, to terrify, «/• 

fright. (Ex, te.rreo.) 
Extra, adv., outside, beyond: prep, with 

acctu., beyond, wilhotii. 
Extraot-UB, a, um, perf. part, of ex- 

traho. 
ExtrahO, extrax-l, extractum, extrah- 
6re, to draw forth, pull out, extract. 
(Ex, traho.) 
Extrem-U3, a, um, tuperl. o/exterus, or 

exter, (seep. 87, 6), the last; highest. 
Extundo, cxtfidl, extasum, extund-Sre, 

to beat out, kick out. (Ex, tundo.) 
Exul, exul-ls, m. or/., an exile. 
Exulo, avl, atum, are, (or oxsulo,) to be 

an exile ; to go into exile. (Exul.) 
Exu-0, i, (ri)tum, 6re, to strip off, plunder, 
despoil, divest of : exuere patrem, to di- 
vest [one's self) of a father's feelings. (Eo 
[ex] duo.) 
Exlir-0, exu88-l, exust-um, exur-Sre, to 
bum up, parch, dry. (Ex, Qi'o.) 



r&Tjell-a, ae, /, « little fable, a fable, 
story. (Fabula.) 

F8.ber, fabri, m., a workman, mechanic. 

Tabul-a, ae,/, a fable. (For, fS-tus.) 

X'aci-eB, 6i, /, make, form, appearance; 
fiue, countenance. (Faclo.) 

raclle, adv., easily; (rarely, /octZt/er.) 

racU-iB, is, e, easy ; affable. (For com- 
pariton, see p. 37.) (Facio.) 

PaoilidB, adv., more easily. 

TacinUB, faclnSr-ls, n., a deed; (gener- 
ally) a bad action, a crime. (Facio.) 

F&cio, feci, factum, fac-ere, to do, make : 
passive, flo, p. 82. 

Faotib. factlbn-is, /., a party, clique, 
faction (Facio.) 



Fact-U8, a, um, perf. p -t. of flo, p. 82. 

{See Facio.) 
Eacund-UB, a, um, eloquent, fluent; I.e., 

composing readily. (For, fatus, to 

speak.) 
Pallax, gen., liallac-ls, «<&'., deceitful, 

treacherous. (Fallo.) 
Fallo, fefelU, falsum, fall-Sre, io deceive, 
1 cheat; to escape rwtice: fallere fidem, 

to break faith. 
Faleri4, Orum, m., Falerii, a town o 

Etruria, in Italy. 
F&lisc-i, orum, m., the Falitci, inhabi- 

tants of Falerii. 
Fal8-US, a, Uiii, faUe, deceKfd, ffeset'^r- 
oui, (Fallo.) 



LATIN VOCABULARY. 



207 



Flm-a, ae, /, rtport. rumour; tht teak 

of the country ; famt. (For, fa-tiis.) 
vx r?'' '*'"^' *""!'<»'.•/«»«•>»«; poverty. 
f amill-a, ae,/, a houie/wld (of tlavet) ; 

domesties; a family. (Famulus.) 
Famlliaritai, famlllarltat-i«, /., inti- 
macy, jriendsMp. (Famllla.) 
r&n-um, I, n., a thrine, temple. (For, 

fa-tu&) 
Fas, n., {indeclinable,) right, (according 

to law of Heaven.) 
FaBtld-io, Ivl, Itum, Tre, to loathe, dis- 

dain, scorn. (Faatuii, haughtinest.) 
Fast-UB, a, um, lauful: fastus dies, a 
day on which common busineu might be 
rfow; (opposed to n<AM<iM.) (Fas.) 
Fiteor, fassus sum, fat-5rl, to coi\feu, 

acknowledge. (For, fa-tus.) 
Fatig^-atus, a, um, perfparU o/fatlg-o, 

avi, &c, to weary, tire; annoy, vex. 
FatisCO, (more rarely fati»cor, dep.), 
fatisc-6re, to go into clefts, to crack, 
open ; be wearied. 
Fftt-um, 1, n.,fate, destiny. (For, fS-tus.) 
FaUStiil-US, 1, m., Fauttulus. 
Fauc-es, ium, / pi., the throat, gullet; 
mouth; a narrow pau, strait, defile. 
(Fauce, abl. sing, of obsolete faux, some- 
times used.) 
(Faux.) See faucei 
F&V-U8, i, TO., a honey-comb. 
Fax, fSc-is,/., a torch, firebrand. 
FecXai-is, (or fetlalis,) is, m., a priest: 
pi., fecial-es, Ium, m., a brotherhood of 
priests at Rome, under whose charge were 
the demanding of sati^action from ene- 
mies who had injured the slate, the declar- 
ation of war, and the making oftreatifs. 
Fel-es, (or fgl-is,) Is,/, a cat. 
Felix, gen., f51ic-la, adj.,fruUful; favovr- 
able, lucky, fortunate, happy. (Fe, root 
of old verb, feo, which is seen in fe-tus, 
_fe-cundu8, fe-mlna, &c) 
Femin-a, ae, /, a female (of any ani- 
mal); a woman. (See ur^r Fe\lx.) 
Fenestr-a, ae, /, an opening in the wall 

of a house (to admit light) ; a window. 
Fer-a, ae, /, a wild beast 
Fere, adv., almost, commonly. 
Fer-io, fer-Ire, to strike; kill. 
Fer-O, tuli, latum, ferre, to carry, bear; 
say; to suffer: aegre ferre, to take 
amiss, take to hearL 
F8rox, ferOc-is, adj., self-confident, prmd; 
vrud, fieice, iuvoge^ cruoi ,- A* <.\ 
(Fenw.) [ 



Ferr-um, !, «., iron ; a sword. 
F8r-U8, a, um, mill, savage, fierce. 
FSr-US, 1, TO., a wild beast. 
FeS8-U8, a, um, wearied, worn out, er- 

hantted. (Fatlsco.) 
Festin-O, avl, atum, are, to mate haste, 

has^ 
Fet-a8, us, m., offspring, young, a brood. 

(See Felix.) 
Fict-U8, a, um, per/ part qf flnpo, 

made-up, feigned, groundless. 
FIdel-is, i», e, faitiiful, trustworthy, re. 

liable. (FideM.) 
Fid-es, f\,f., faith; truthfulness, sincerity; 
honesty; credit; a vow; promise: ser- 
vare fldem, to keep a promise: viol ,ie 
fldem, to break a promise. 
FldHci-a, ae, /, confidence ; hence, pre. 

sumption, assurance. ;Fidu«.) 
Fid-U8, a, um, trusty, faitl\ful, to be re- 
lied on. (Fldo.) 
Figur-a, ae, /, figure, shape; make. 

(Kingo, root qf which is flg-.) 
Fili-a, ae,/, a daughter; dot and abl 

pi., fllils, or flllabus. 
Fili-us, i,m.,a son: vac sing., flll, for 
fllie. 

Fing-0, flnx-1, flct-nm, flng-ere, to make 
up, fashion, form ; invent; devise ; feign. 

F!n-io, Ivl, Itum, Ire, to finish, put an 
end to. (Finis.) 

Fin-is, Is, m. or /, an end, limit, fron- 
tier: in pi., territory. 

Finltlm-as, a, um, bordering on, neigfi- 
bouring: as subst, q neighbour, inti- 
maUfriend. (Finis.) 

Fio, factnssum, fieri, (pass, o/facio,) to 
be made; become; happen. (Seep. 82.) 

Firm-US, a, nm, firm, strong, well-knit 

Fisc-US, i, m., a money bag, pwtse. 

Fligell-um, i, n., alash, whi^;' (dimin. 
q^flagrum, a whip.) 

Flagit-0, avl,, atum, are, to demand 
(imperiously), insist on. (Frequentative, 
verb from root flag-, which occurs in 
flagro, to bum, be in a passion.) 

Flamen, flamln-ls, m., a priest (of some 
particular deity). (Said to be from 
filum, a fillet, which was worn on the 
head. Old form of spelling, ^amen.) 

Flamm-a, ae, /, a flame, blaze, torch, 
(From root flag-, (see Flagito,) cu if 
flagma.) 

Flav-US, a, um, yellow, golden. 

FlectO, flexl, flexum, fiect-ere, to btndt 
change; turn. 



208 



LATIN VOCABTJLARY. 



Fl-eO, «tI, Btum, ere, to tetep, lament^ 

uaiL 
Flet-U8, u% m., weeping, lamentation, 
wailing, 

F15r-eo, ul, ere, to Jlov>tr, /lourith ; be 
prosperout; be/amom. (Flos.) 

F168, tiOr-ls, m-, a blossom, ftovtr. 

Fluct-U8, u^ m., a wave, billow. 
(Fluo.) 

Flumen, flQmln-is, «., a stream, river ; 
food. (Fluo.) 

Fluvi-ua, 1, m., a stream, river. (Fluo.) 

F6cfil-US, i, TO., a little hearth, bratier, 
chafing dish ; (dimin. from f5cu^ a 
hearth.) 

F8d-io, fO<ll, fossum, fBd-ere, to dig, 
delve, penetrate. 

Foed'US, a, uni, /out; disgrac^l. 

Foedus, foed6r-l8, n., a league, treaty: 
icero foedu^ to make a treaty. 

FSli-um, 1, n., a leaf. 

Fons, font-is, TO., a fountain, spring. 

For, fStus sum, fori, (dep.,) to speak, de- 
clare, itc, 

F5ras, adv., to the doors, outward, out of 
doors; abroad. It is an old accus. 
pi., ■whose dat and abl. appear In the 
ttAy.foris, out of doors, abroad. 

FSre, and fBrem, to be about to be ; (de- 
fective verb, for which see p. 78, 
note t-) 

Form-a, *e, /., sltape, form; beauty; 
general appearance, carriage, bearing. 
(Said to be derived from firo, or from 
Gr. fiop*/)^, by transposition of letters.) 

FormiC-a, ae,/, an ant. 

Form58-UB, a, vxa, finely formed, beauti- 
ful (Forma.) 

Forsan, (Jor fors sit an,) adv., perhaps, 
''chance so." {Yor% chance.) 

Forte, adv., by chance, perhaps. (Fors.) 

Fort-lB, is, e, strong ; brave. 

Fortissime, adv., (superl,) very bravely. 

Fortitude, fortltadm-is, /., bravery; 
fortitude; endurance. (Fortls.) 

Fortuit-US, a, um, accidental, chance, 
casual. (Fors.) 

Fortun-a, ae, /., fortune: as proper 
name, the goddess Fortune. (Fors.) 

For-uni, i, «., a market-place; the For- 
um {(it Rome.) 

Fove-a, ae,/.,a;)rt; weU. 

Foveo, fBvl, fBtum, fSv-Bre, to warm; 
cherish; caress, fondle 

If act-US, a,xuii, broken; {perf.puri. if 
fraagu.) 



Fradn-um, (or frinnm,) 1, «., a Mi 
bridle; pi fTaena, n., or fraenl, m. 
(See FrCnum.) 

Fr&gor, frag^r-ls, to., a crash, noise, 
din. (Franpo.) 

Frang-0, trPg-l, fract-um, frang-6re, to 
break, shatter ; overcome, subdue. 

Fr&ter, frfttr-is, m., a brother. 

Fraud-0, &vi, atum, are, to cheat, de- 
ceive, overreach, outwit. (Frans.) 

Fraufl, fraud-is, /, deceit, guile, fraud, 
trick. 

Fren-um, l, n. (See fraenum.) 

FrequentiuB, adv., more thickly (peo- 
pled), more crowded; more frequently. 
(Frcqucns.) 

Fr8quent-0, avl, atum, are, to visit fre- 
quently; fiequent. (Frequens.) 

FrigUS. friB6r-is, n., cold: in pi, cold 
days, cold weather, 

Friv61-US, a, um, silly; trifling, petty, 
frivolous; worthless. 

Frons, ft-ont-is, /., the forehead, brow; 
front. 

Frons, frond-l»,/., a leaf; foliage. 

Fruct-U8, us, TO., enjoyment; fruity 
produce; income; consequence, result. 
(Fruor.) 

Frtiment-um, (».«., ftflgimentum,) i, n., 
com, grain. (Fruges.) 

Fruor, fructus, or fruitns sum, frul, 
(dep. 3,) to etyoy, delight in. 

FrUStra, adv., in vain ; uselessly. 

Frust-um, l, «., a bit, crumb, broken 
piece, scrap. 

Frutex, frutlc-ls, to., a shrub, bush; 
shrubbery. 

FruX, frug-ls, (usually in pi, fiHg-es,) 
um, f. I fruits of the earth, produce, yield. 

Fuc-US, i, TO., a drone bee, 

Fuifeti-US, l, to., Fuffetius. 

Fug-a, ae,/.,/«j7A<. 

Fug-io, fug-i, fQgltum, fQg-ere, to flee, 
runaway; try to escape; avoid. (Ffiga.) 

Fugit-O, avi. Stum, are, to run away 
hastily, Si^amper off, (Frequentative, 
from fugio.) 

Fiig-O, avl, atum, are, to put to flight, 
hunt away, beat off. (Fugo.) 

Fulg-eo, fuls-i, fulg-5re, to shine, 
ghtter. 

Fulgur, fulgiir-is, n., lightning. (From. 
Fulgeo.) 

Fuliaen, folmln-ls, »., (te., fulgimen,) 
^ du..*^j]j.-.h^u , jt ccdam^y. (FiUfceo-) 

Falmiae-US, a, um, belongtng to light. 



LATIN VOCABULARY. 



ning:lioMn%ng.Hkt; thumiering ; de- 
ttruetive. (Fulmen.) 

Pund-a, ae, /, a iling; easting-net. 

FundltUS, adv., ffoin the very founda- 
tion; by the root; entirely, completely. 
(Fundus.) " J V 

Pund-0, avi, fttum, are, to lay the bate- 
ment of, fouml; fatten, fecure. (Fundus.) 

rundO, mdl. rasum, ftind-Crc, to pour 
o..t; thed; product abundantly; put to 
rout, defeat. 



209 



Fund-ua, I, m., the hoUom or base qf 

anything; a farm, estate. 
Fflnus, funCr-ls, n., a burial, fUneral; 

death. 
Fflr, fflr-ls, m. or/, a thi/f. 
Furi-U8, 1, m., Furiut (Af. Camillut). 
FurtXm, adv., by itealth; tecrttlv. 

tFuj.) 

F«H4», In, m., a club, cudgel 
rutflr-u>, a, um, about to be; (A.t 
part, qr ■um, p. 78.) ^ ' 



G. 



Gabi-i, orum, m. pi, Oabii, a town of 

Latium, in Italy. 
Oabln-i, orum, m., the people of Oabii; 

(nom. pi. tnase. of following.) 
Gabln-US, a, um, belonging to Oabii 
Gall-i, orum, m., the Oauls; sing 

Callus, a Gaul. 
Galli-a, ae, /, Oaul, (France.) 
Gall-US, 1, m., a Oaul: proper name, 

Gallui : oj common noun, a cock. 
Gaudeo, gSvisus sum, gaud-iSre, to re- 
joice, to be glad; to delight in. 
Gaudi-um, l, n.,Joy, gladness. (Gaudeo.) 
uelu, geias, »., (also in nom., pelus, m., 

and pel um, n.,) cold, _frosty chill. 
GemIn-0, avi, atum, are, to double. 
Gemin-U3, a, um, twin; twofold: gem- 
in!, twins. 

Gemme-U8, a, um. set with gems, pearly • 
spangled; variegated. (Gcmmfi, a gem.) 
Gen-a, ae,/, a cheek: usually in pi. geiiue 
Gener, gener-i, m., a son-in-law. 
Genitor, gemtOr-ls, m., a father; parent, 

((Jignoj gen-ul.) 
Gens, geht-ls,/, a nation, tribe. 
Genu, gen-fls, n., the knee: pi. ggnna 
Genus, gSnCr-is, n., li„d, race; origin. 

(Gen-, roo< o/gigno.) 
German-i, omm, m., the Germans. 
Ger-0, gessl, gestum, gcr-Cre, to wear; 
bear, carry: gerere se, to conduct one's 
self, behave as. 
Gign-0, g6n-ui, g5nit-um, gtgn-5re, 
beget, bring forth, 

61aci-es, Gl, /, ice. 
Gladi-us, i, m., a sword, 
Glans, gland-is,/, an acorn. 
Gleb-a, ae, /, a clod, the soil 
Glon-a, ae,/, glory, renown. 



pl, Graeci, 



to 



G15ri5s.us, a. nm, glorious, fameat 

boastful, (Gloria.) 
Gricll-is, is, e, slender, delicate, thin: 

graceful {See p. 'ST.) 

gr|cfiI-U8. «. WJ., a jackdaw, njay. 
Orad-US, as, »«., « step, pace, degree, 
Oraeci-a,ae,/, Oreece, 
Graec-US, l, m., a Greek-. 

the Greeks. 
Grimen, gramln-is, «., a blade of grass 

grass, pasture. ' 

Gran-um, 1, n., a pile, ptekle, grain; 
corn. 

Grass-or, atus sum, an, (dep. i,) to ad. 

vance; proc' Id against; attack. (Grad- 
lor.) 

Grati-a, ae, /, favour, grace; beauty; 

gratitude: agero gratlas, to thank- 

habere grntlas, to be grai^ul: gratia! 

I abl., for the sake of: redire in grutiam 

to be reconciled. ' 

6rati-ae, arum, / pi, thanks. (See 
Grntla.) 

Gratiil-or, atus sum, ari, to wish joy. 

congratulate. (Gratus.) 

Grat-US, a, um, agreeable, pleasant- 
grateful ' 

Gravat-us, a, um, oppressed, weighed 
down, overburdened; (perf part, of 
pravo, to oppress.) 

Gr&V-is, is, e, heavy, weighty; impor. 

tant. ' 

Gravlter, adv., (compar. gravius, superl 
gravlssime.) heavily, severely, greatly; 
sorely. (Gravis.) 

Grav-O, avi, stum, Sre, to render heavy 
burden, load, oppress. (Gravis ) 

Grex, grSg-i.s, m., a flock, herd. 



_.„..-„, „^,^., y,^ry, renown. Grns- «^ "rnia — .... ~ - ~ 

wiun-or, atuo sum, ari, (dep 1 ) tonhirti hrtaV ^ x\~'-Z '■'""' "'■ "' •^•' ' 

• boast. (Gloria.) ^^' X^f^°' ^'''' '*'""'• ^'"'^ "> ''■"^ 

' ' 'Gatt.a,ae,/, arfroi,. 

(122) -^^ 



/ 



210 



LATIN VOCAnULART. 



Hib-eo, ul, num. era, to havt; hold; 
foruider, 

H&blt-O, avi. Ht»"i. 'H'e, to dwtll in, in- 
hahit. (lliibuo.) 

H&blt-U», OS, m., habit; external drtu 
or appearance ; manner, way. (Ilabuo.) 

Haer-«0, lm»'»l, Imcs-um, hiier-Bro, to 
ttick to, »tickfa*t, cltng, otlhere. 

Hast-a, a(i,/.,aipear. 

Haud, ado., not; by no mean*. 

Haust-U8, as, m., « draught. (Ilanrio, 
liuust-um.) 

Helvlti-i.onifn. m., the Ilehetii, (Steiu.) 

Herotll-eS, is, m., llereules: Herciile, 
adv., wed as an oath,- By Hercules I 

HSri, adv., yesterday. 

BQVLi, inteij; ho / hark I holla I 

Hibern-a, omm, «. pi, winhr qwirtert; 
(n. pi. of aiij., liiborn-ufl, a, uin.) 
(llleins.) 

Hie, hacc, hoc, Uiis, (tee p. -42) : abl, hoc, 
on this account. 

Hio, adv., in this place, here ; on this, 
hereupon. (Hie.) 

HI8m-0, Svl, atum, are, to pass the win- 
ler; toieinter. (Hienis.) 

HIem-8, hiiSm-is, /, winter. 

Hinc, adv., from this place (or lime); 
hence; herenfter; from this cause. 
(Hie) 

Hirc-ua, 1, m., ahegoat. 

Hi8t6ri-a, ae,/, a history, story, record. 

Homo, hSmln-is, m. or /., a human 
being, a uMn or woman, a child; man- 
kind. 

Honest-US, a, um, respected; honour- 
able; honest, upright. (Honor.) 



HSnor, or honoi, honoru, m., honour, 

gliru; preferment; qfice (of trust.) 
H5nfir-0, &vl, atum, are, to Uunour, 

esteem, res}>ect. (Honor.) 
Hfira, lie,/, an hour; time, 
H6riti-i, orum, ««., the (brothers) Ilor- 

alii. 
H6riti-tH, 1, m., noratiut, Horace i 

lloralius Codes. 
Horde-um, l, n., barley. 
Horrond-US, a, um, to be dreaded; 
dreadful; (fut. part. pau. {gerundice] 
of hoiieo.) 
Horr-eo, ul, Bro, to shudder; be(0-aid 

of, dread. (Horror.) 
Horre-um, i, ♦»., a bam, grain-store. 
Horror, horrOr-l», m., horror, dreaiL 
Hort-or, a(u» sum, ail, to exhort; en- 

conrwje. 
Hort-U8, 1, m., an enclosed place; garden. 
Hospfis, hospTt-li, »»»., o stranger, gue.it; 

host. 
Hosplti-um, >, n-i hospitality ; a place Mf 

entertainment, lodging. (Hospes.) 
Hostil-is, is, e, of or belonging to an 

enemy; hostile, inimical. (HosMs.) 
H08tili-UB, 1, m., Uostilius ; TuUut Ifos- 

tilius. 
Host-is, Is, m. or/, an enemy. 
Hflmau-UB, a, um, belonging to man- 

kind,' human; kind. (H6mo.) 
Hum§r-U8, l, m., the upper bone or part 

of the arm ; the shoulder. 
Hiimll-is, l», e, lote-lying; lowly, 

humble. (Humus) 
Hiim-U8,l,/, theeurlK t/ie (round. 
Hydr-U3, i, m., avi:>et- '-I )".<'.. 



I. 



icere foedus, 

(Ico.) 

of 



Ibi, adv., there, 
lc~0, i. Sun, 6re, to strike 
Ic wjo « leagic 

It;''- :i'i ">.•*, f»., 'I ..iroke, blow. 
Ict-iU«^ ^. '1 , -itruck; (perf part 

Idesli, eftdem, Idem, gen. cjusdem, the 

same. (See p. 43.) 
Ideo, adv., therefore, accordingly, on that 

account, f^-r Utat ressr-n, 
Tgltar, adv., thertfOre, then. 



Ignavl-a, ae, /., want of activity; idle- 
ness; cowardice. (Ignavus.) 

Ignav-U8, a, um, inactive; idle, lazy; 
cowardly. (In, gnavui.) 

Ign-is, i.\ W-, fi>'«- 

Ignor-O, oj^ atum, are, to he ignoran 
ofnottoWow. (Igiiarus.) [pctrdon. 

Ig-nosco, novi, Jiotum, noscfire, to 

Ignot-US, a, um, unknown: unacquainted 
i.r!ih stranoe. (IP; notns.) 

nie, ilia, lllud, that. (See p. 42, 6.) 



LATIX VOCARTTLARY. 



TmlgO, lml((tn.|i,/, an tmofft, Mentu. 
{""bgcill-m, •, urn, mak,/t€bU. 
imbell-is, li, e, i<iiirar/ii;« ,• couxtrUly 

(In, bcllum.) 
Imber, Imbr-U, ,.., rain, a ihowtr. 

imit-or, itui iuin, an, <o ,„„/a<«, 

copy. 

Immitflr-UB, a, um. «»n>)^ premature. 

(Iri [ho/], inaturua.) 
Imraln-eo, ul, Cre, to overhang (in a 
ttue<itenmgway),impeml, b« imminent. 
Immisc-eo, ui, iinml»t-um (or Immlxt- 
uiii), linnilHC-Bre, to mingle vitK, mix 
(In, inlsceo.) 
Immitt-0, Immlvl, Iminlss-um, Immitt- 
t\ a, to, end into; let loose. (In, inltto.) 
lmmol-0, fivl, atum. are, to iocri/ke, 

mmolate. (In, mflla.) 
Impar, gen., Inipai'.ls, aiff., unequal to, 

not a match/or. (In, not, and par.) 
impediment-um, l, «., an obstruction, 
himtrance: in pi. Impedimenta, bag. 
cage. (Impedlo.) 
Impgd-io, Ivl, itum, ire, to obstruct, 
entangle, hinder. (In, and pes, pedis.) 
impJdlt-us, % um, per/, part, of Im- 
pCdio. 

Impend-eo, Cre, to overftang, impend, 

threaten. (In, peiideo.) 
Impgrator, iinpCrfitOr-ls, m., a military 

commamter, general. (Impero.) 
Imperi-um, l, n., military command; 

power, authority ; empire. (Impero.) 
impgr-0, avl, atum, are, to command, 

govern, rule, give orders. (In, and paro ; 

Itterallp, to put upon: to compare, to 

put together; separo, to put asunder.) 
Impetr-0, fivl, atum, are, to obtain, pro- 

cure. (In, patro, to bring to pass.) 
lmpet-U8, Qs, m., an attack, assault; 

tmpetuosity : violent motion; impulse 

(Impeto.) 

Impiger, impi«r-,n, impigr-um, not slow; 
not Idle ; not lazy ; active, energetic. (In, 
piRt'i.) 
Impinge, ImpSjc-I.lmpact-um, Imping- 
Cie, to dash against; drive into ; fling. 
(In, piingo.) 
Impi-us, a, um, unduti/ul; unholy; im- 

pious, profane. (In, plus.) 
Impl-eo, 6vi, etum, eie, to Jill up, fill. 
impUc-o,avi(o»- ui), atum (or Icltum), 
iire, to entwine, entangle: impllcatus 
morbo, attacked with disease 
Implor-O. avi. iltum, are, v, a, i to 
implore, entreat. 



211 



Imp8n-o, ImpOiu-l, Impfltlt-um, lmpa». 

flro, to put upon, lay upon. (In, pOno) 
Import-0, »vl, itum, ire, to carry into, 

import, introduce; bring upon, caio* 

(In. porto.) 

Imp8iit-ai, a, nm, per/, part, of Im- 
pono. 

ImprJbitai, Improbltat-la, /., wmt V 
uprightness; wickedness; violenet. (Im- 

prfibui.) 

Impr6b-US, a, um, not upright; regard- 

less; tricked (In, probus.) 
Impradena, gen., Imprudent-i*, <k^„ 

not foreseeing; thoughtless, inconsideraU, 
T ""^'*?'^^"'" ""««'<»'•«. (In, prudens.) 
Impadem, gen. Impddent-ls, «<#, 

Without shame, shameless, bar^aeed, 

impudent. (In, pudcna.) 
Impflne, adv., without punishment, with 

impunity, sq/ely. (In poena. See Pu. 

nio.) 

ImpiSt-0, avl, atum, are, toattributt to, 

impute, reckon against. (In, puto.) 
Im-US. a, um, inmost, lowest: used as/orm 
0/ superl. 0/ InfervM. (Seep. 87.) (By 
»<}me said to be contracted for inimut 
[siiperL of in]; by others from ifyJmtM.) 
In, prep. Bith abl, in, on, at, among, 
near; with accus., into, toward, to, 
against. Used as a prefix, in, into, 4c ; 
as, importo, influo. (For change qf final 
letter, see nejct word.) 
In, used as a pr^, = un, or '«•<' »» Eng. 
hsh. Before b and p it becomes im; 
before/, to, r, it is a-sslmilated : as, 0- 
labor for inlabor, imbellis for inbellis, 
irrideo for inrideo. 
Inambul-0, avl, atum, are, to walk up 

and down. (In, ambulo.) 
Inan-is, is, e, empty, void; useless; vain. 
Incedo, incessl, incessum, Inced-gre, to 
go into; advance, march /orward; 
itrut, stalk. (In, c5do.) 
Incend-0, l, Incens-um, lncend-6re, to 
set on fire, burn. (Root can-, as in 
candeo.) 
Inoens-us, a, um, influmed; enraged; 

{per/, part, o/lncendo.) 
Incid-0, i, Incas-um, i:icld-gve, to /all 
upon, attack; /aU in with; occur, hap. 
pen. (In cfido.) 
Incipi-o, incep-1, incept-um, inclp-fire, 
to begin; take up; undertake. (In, 
capio.) 

xnciiat-us, a, um, urged on, Btimtuatcd, 
prompted; (f,er/ part, of incito.) 



212 



LATIN VOOABULAKY. 



Inoit-0, Rvl, Rtnm, Rro, to urge on, in- 

ctVc, stimiiiate. (In clto.) 
Inclam-O, avi, iltuui, h\i.\tothoiit(ihmil; 
thout to; call oiU wjuiiut, rej>roadi. 
(In, clanio.) 
Inclfld-0, liiclQ»-l, Ini'ins-um, Incind- 
5io, to shut ill, incluik; coi^ne; Ain- 
</(•»•. (In, clau'lo.^ 
Inclyt-119, (or iiii'Utus, or Incintiis,) a, 
uni, much hi'tird o/, famed, cvkbratcd. 
(In, clueo, to be esteemed.) 
Inc51-a, ao, r.u 01/., an inlMhitant. (In- 

fCilo.) 
Ilic51uin-is, is, e, unhurt, $({fe; entire. 

(I'.tyniolo);}' doubtful.) 
InCOnvSniens, gen. Inconvcnli-nt-ls, 
«({;'., not ayreeinij vilh; not .<ii/ital>le ; 
di.<.<timilur, iiiconijnwut. (In. cou- 
venio.) 
Increp-0, ui, Uum, iiru, to make a fi<irsh 
noise; to ujibraitl, rtproacft, revile. 
(In, cTcpo.) 
Incresc-0, IncrCv-l, Incrosc-Crc, to grow 

on, increase. (In, crosco.) 
Incursio, incursion-ls,/., arunfifn(7/or- 
nard; incursion, inroail, invasioti, 
(In, curro.) 
Inctlti-O, incusa-i, Incnss-viin, Inout-fre, 
to strike into or against; hurl; inspire 
irith. (In, qimtlo.) 
Inde, «<'•'•, ffom that place, thence; there; 

thii-ent'ter. 
'Index, ind1c-i3, til. or /., something that 
foints: hence, an informer; a mark, 
sign; means of information. (In, and 
die-, to point out. S(e l^ieo.) 
Ind!c-0, flvi, utuni, rue, to point out, 

indicate, show. (Index.) 

IndiCO, indix-l, indict-um, lndlc-6re, to 

sai/alomi, proclaim, declare, (In.dieo.) 

Indignat-U3, n, um, p. part. of imnnnoi: 

Indigne, adv., in an iinwortlii/ manner, 

iinirorthilij , shavicfuUij. (lndi(;nus.) 
Indign-Or, runs sum, fu-i, (dep. 1,) to 
consider nmcorthy ; be angry at; to be 
indignant. (Indij^Tius.) 
Industri-a, ae, /., diligence, activity, in- 
dustry. (Industiins.) 
Industri-US, a, um, diligent, active, in- 

di:slnoii3. 
Inedi-a, ao, /., abstaining from food; 

tninty hunger; starvation. (In, edo.) 
Inepti-a, ae, /., sUly conduct, folly : in 
pi, ineptiae, trifles; absurdities, fooler- 
ies. (Ineptus.) 
IneiB, ^'» i>'crt-i% a(t , devoid of skill ; 



vanting energy ; irilhoul rewuree, help- 
less; lazy, indolent. (In, uix) 
Inami-a, ao, /., bad report; illreput.': 

di.ti/racc (Iiifii/niii.) 
Infana, gen. Intunt-ls, adj., unable to 
speak, mute; young: Iieiiee, (U lubst., 
an infant, child. (In, and for, fatus.) 
Infelix, gen. Inrelic-ls, a<(;., unty-ui{/ul; 

unhappy; miserable. (In, fcllx.) 
Inferior, m. and /., Infcrlu.i, n., farther 
down, Uwer; inferiiir; conipar. of iu- 
ferns. (See p. ;)7.) 
Infer-0, imul-i, lllatnm, Infeire, to bring 
in, introduce; trage {war). (In, fero.) 
Infest-O, avl, utuni, are, to attack; an- 
noy; injure. (Infest us.) 
Infest-U8, a, \\n\, carried against, (old 
particip. qf Infcio;) hostile; trouble- 
some. 
Inflammat-US, a, um, set on fire ; in- 
flamed; roused, enraged; (pcrf. part. 
o/inttammo.) 
Infl-0, avl, atuni, arc, to blow into ; blow 

up, puff up, inflate. (In, tio.) 
Infund-0, iufiiil-l, Inmn-um, Infund-Cro, 
to pour into; to pour out for ; to infuse. 
(In, fundo.) 
Ingem-0, ul, Itum, Bro, to groan over ; 

bewail, lament. (In, gemo.) 
Ingeni-um, l, «., natural (juality, tem- 
per, dL<:position ; talent. (In, and ^'en-, 
stem of gljcno.) 
Ingens, gen. indent-is, <«(/., not natural, 
monstrous; immense, huge, (In, nut; 
and gen-, stem uf gigno.) 
Ingenu-U8, a, um, free-fm-n, noble; 

ingenuous. (In, and root of gigno.) 
Ingrat-US, a, um, disagreeable; un- 

grdtiful. (In, gratus.) 
Ingre^ior, Ingressus sum, IngvCd-i, 
((/('/). 3,) to go forward; enter; advance, 
(In, gradior.) 
IntmiC-US, a, um, unfriendly; hostile: 

as subst., an ctieiny. (In, amiens.) 
Initi-um, i, «., an entering upon; a be- 
ginning, (Into.) 
Injicio, injoei, injectum, injic-6rc, to 
throw or fling in; thrust; inspire 
(In, Jacio.) 
Injuri-a, ae,/., injustice; injury, wrong; 

oppression; insult. (In, jus.) 
Injuste, adv., unjustly, wrongfully; in- 
juriously. (Injuitus.) 
InjUSt-US, a, um, tiiyust, wrongful 

(In, juatus.) 
Innbcens. aen. Innocent-ls, acfr., fi'ce 



LATIN VOOAnULAIlY. 



21.} 



from guilt, intiocent, unoffending; 
harmle.il. (In, nocciis.) 
Innoxi-US, a, um, ./V/« from hurl; not 

hurtful, harmltsa; innocent. 
In5pi-a, ao, /, tcnrcity, want, roverty. 

(In()])s,) 
Inops, gm. lnrtp-i», atd, mthout re- 
lourres, poor, needy, helplens, destitute 
of. (In, opis.) 
Inquam, I my. (Seep. 9fi.) 
InquIn-0, flvl, atmn, are, to bedaub; 

»/(tit! ; defilf, pollute. 
Inrit-US, U>r Initim,) (V, um, vnin, un- 

availing, uselets. (I„, „yd. mm) 
Insan-US, a, um, vnmuud in tniiid, in- 

mne, mad. (In, siiiius.) 
Insci-US, a, um, not knowing, ignorant; 

VTiconncioiis. (In, scio.) ' [ 

Insequor, insccntus simi, Insnqu-I, to foU 
l<><^ after, punm; to en»u». (In.sequor.) 
Inser-O, ul, turn, ere, v. a. ;i, to thmy 

in, in^nrt. 
Insldeo, InsCdl, Insessum, Insld-Crc, to 

fit upon. (In, sedeo.) 
tnsidi-ae, arum, / pi., an ambush, 

snare; treachery. 
Insldids-us, a, nm, treacherous, dtceit- 

fvl crafty. (Imldlao.) 
Insidi-or, atus sum, arl, {dtp. l,) to lay 
snares for; lie in ambush ; plot against. 
(Insidlae.) 
Insigne, (n. of InslRnis, vsed as subst.,) 

a badge, viark, token. 
Insign-is, is, c, remarkable, notable, 

famous. (In, and slgnum.) 
Insil-io, uf, (or 11,) Insultmn, InslMre, 

iojeap upon ; attack. (In sailo.) 
Insolens, gen. insolent-is, a(^., insolent, 
overbearing, haughty; impudent. (In, 

SOlfiO.) 

Ins61enti-a, ae, /, insolence; haughti- 
ness^; impudence. (InsSlens.) 

Inspicio, Ingpexi, Inspectum, Inspic- 
ere, to look into, examine. (In, speclo.) 

Instans, gen. ln»tant-is, adj., (also par- 
ticip. of Insto,) present; instant, imme- 
diate; impending. 

InstItU-0, i, turn, 6re, to set up, estab- 
lish; resolve. (In, statao.) 

Inst-0, Itl, itum, or atum, are, to stand 
upon, press m; to be near, close at 
hand. (In, sto.) 

Instru-0, xl, ctum, gre, to draw up in 
order. (In, struo.) 

lasuet-UB, a, um. unaccustomed; inex- 
perienced; unusual (Insucsco.) 



Insiil-a, ao, /, an islanrl 
Insult-O, ftvl, fttum, are, to tramjilc on. 
leap upon; insult. (ludlllo.) 



lun, untouched; sound 



Intact-US, a, 

(In, tanffo.) 
IntSger, intonfr-a, Intojfr-um. un- 
touched; undiminished; unscathed ; 
ichi'le. entire. (In, tariKo.) 
Intelllgo, IntulNixl, liitcllcctiim, Intel- 
IIk f!i(!, to understand, comjn-ehend. 
(Inter, lopo.) 
Intend-0, l, inten-num, or tu?n. Intend- 
fire, to stretch, strain; strive; direct, 
(III, tendo.) 
Intent-U8, a, um, bent on, earnest, eager 

for; (pcrf. part. ofU\U',m\(>.) 
Inter, prep, with accus., between, among; 

during. 
Inter-clpio, enpl, ceptum, clpCre, to 

intercept, hinder; steal; anticipate. 
Interdiu, adv., by day. 
IntSrea, adv., ih the meantime. 
Interest, impers.verb, it concerns; itis the 
i7,te.re.H of (Seep. 98, S>, (1), aid note.) 
Interflcio, IntevfCcl, Interfeetum, in- 
tcrflc-6re, tofiniih, put an end to; slay, 
kill. (Inter, facio.) 
Inlerim, ctdv., in the meantime. 
Interimo, interCml, interemptum, in- 
terlm-Crc, to take out of the midst of; 
destroy ; kill. (Inter, and drno, to take.) 
IntSrIt-US, us, nu, destruction, death. 

(Intert'o, to perish.) 
Interject-us, a, um, (rerf. part, of in- 

terJTelo,) having intervened. 
Interjicio, interJCci, Interjectum, Inter- 
Jlc-5re, to throw in between, insert, 
(Inter, Jacio.) 
Internecio, intemeclOn-Ia, /, slauyh- 

ter, massacre. (Inter, nex ) 
Intgro, intrivl, Intrltum, int?r-6re, to 

rub in ; crumble ; mince. (In, tero.) 
Interpono, interposal, lnteip6sifum, 
interpon-gre, to put in between, insert, 
interpose. (Inter, pono.) 
Interposit-US, a, um, {perf. part, of 
InterpOno,) having intervened^ or been 
inserted- or alleged. 
Interrogat-US, a, um, perf part, of 

Intenofjo. 
Interrog-O, avi, atum, are, to ask, in- 
quire. (Inter, rojfo.) 
Interrumpo, Intcnupl, Interruptum, 
Interrump Sr!>, .ii h.,(rst in upon, inla-- 
rupt. (Inter, nimpo.) 
Intersum, interftil, lutoresn*, to be 



2U 



LATIN VOCABULARY, 




praenl at or among ; to he of impor- 
tance. (Inter, Bum.) 
IntervSn-io, l, tum, ire, {see Venlo,) to 

come in between, intervene, interrupt; 

put on end to. (Inter, venio.) 
Intrit-US, a, um, (per/, part. o/lnt6ro,) 

crumbled; minced, 
Intr-O, avi, atum, are, to enter 
Intromitto, Intromisi, fic, (see Mitto,) 

to send into; introduce. (Intro, niitto.) 
Intulit, per/, ind. 0/ infero. 
Inutll-is, is, e, useless; vcithout advan- 
tage. (In, utilis.) 
Invad-O, Invasl, invasum, invad-Cre, to 

go agaimt; come on; attack; trJer. 

(In, vado.) 
Inveho, invcxl, Invectum, invCli-Cie, to 

carry in or on: passive, to ride. (In, 

vcho.) 
InvSn-io, <fcc., («« Venio,) to come upon, 

find (In, venio.) 
Invid-eo, invldl, invisum, invld-Cre, to 

look on (tcilh malice); to envy; hate. 

(In, Tidco.) 
Invidi-a, ae, /., envy; hatred; malice. 

(Invideo.) 
luvicem, adv., in tum; time about. 

(In, vicis.) 
Invigll-O, avl, atum, are, to lie awake; 

to keep watch on\ to be earnest on, (In, 

vigUo.) 



InviS-US, a, um, (per/ part, o/lnyldeo,) 

liated; hatful 
Invit-0, avi, atum, are, to invite ; suiiir 

man. (Invitus.) 
Invit-U8, a, um, unwilling, reluctant. 
Invoc-O, avi, atum, are, to call upon^ 

invoke. (In, voce ) 
Ips-e, a, um, self; very. (Seep. 42.) 
Ir-a, ae, /, anger', wrath. 
IraCUndi-a, ae, /., irascibility, rage; 

/relfulncss. (Irficundus.) 
Iracund-US, a, um, passionate, irascible, 

(Ira.) 
Irascor, Iratus sum, irasc-i, (dep. 3,) to 

heanjry. (Ira.) 
Irat-U3, a, um, (pet/, part. 0/ ira>cor,) 

enraged ; angry. 
Irrev6cabil-is, is, e, that cannot he re- 
called, iiTevocable. (In, re, back, and 

voce.) 
Irrit-U8, a, um, same as inrltus, (which 

see.) 
Is, ea, id, <;iw. (See p. 43.) 
Ist-e, a, ud, that (0/ yours). (See 2'- ^3, 

7.) 
Ita, adv., thus, so, yes. 
Itali-a, ae, /, Italy. 
Itaque, adv., there/ore, accordingly. 
Iter, Itiu6r-i8, n., a Jourtmy; road; 

march. 



J. 



J&C-eo, ul, ttnm, 5re, to lie, 

JaciO, j5ci, jactum, jac-Cre, to throw, cast. 

Jact-0, avi, atum, are, to throw often, or 

with vigour; to toss; boast. (Jacio.) 
Jam, adv., already, now. 
Jaulcul-um, i, »»., Janiculum, one 0/ the 

hills 0/ Rome. 
Janu-a, ae, /., a gate, door. 
Jan-US, i, m., Janus, one 0/ the Roman gods. 
J6c-U8, 1, m., [pi. i, m., or a, «.,) a joke, 

jest; story; rnirth. 
Jiibeo, jussi, jussum, jub-5re, to order, 

bid, comtnancL 
Judex, judlc-is, m. or /., a judge. (Jus, 

dice.) 
Judici-um, i, «., a judgment, decision. 

(Judex.) 
JudIC-0, avi, atum, Sre, to judge, decide; 

catyecture. (Judex.) 
Jug-um, i, n., a yoke; a ridge (of a hill, 

dx,) (Junga) 



Juli-US, i, tn., Julius, a Roman name; 

(Julius Proculus.) 
Juni-US, i, m., Junius, a Roman name; 

(L. Ji^nius Brutus.) 
Juno, Junon-is, /, the goddess Juno, wife 

0/ Jupiter. 
Jupiter, JQv-is, m., Jupiter. (Seep. Si.) 
Jurgi-um, i, »., a quarrel, stri/e. (Jur- 

B0-) 
JuS3-US, us, m., an vrder. (Jubeo.) 
JU3, jur-is, «., right, justice, law. 
Justiti-a, ae,/, justice. (Jus.) 
Just-U3, a, um, right, true, just, proper, 

/air. (Jus.) 
Juven-is, is, m. and /, adj., young: aa 

subst., a young man or woman. 
Juvent-U3, juventat-is, /., the season of 

youth; youth; young people. (Juvenis.) 
JUVO, jQvi, jatum,juv-are, to help, assist. 
Juxta, prep, with accus., ana adv.. rwar 

to, near; alike. 



LATIN VOCABULAEY. 



215 



L., an abbreviation /br Luclua 

Labien-US, l, m., Labienua, one of Cae- 
»ar'$ lieutenants. 

Labor, labOr-is, m., labour, toil. 

labor-O, avl, ntum, niR, to Ui'mur, toil, 
strive; be in difficulty; be opin-esscd. 
(Labor.) 

Lac, lact-is, n., milk. 

Lacer-0, avl, atum, aro, to tear, mangle, 
mutilate. (Lacer, mangled.) 

Lacess-0, ivi, itum, 6ie, to irritate, pro- 
voke; vex. (Lacio.) 

L&crim-a, ae, /., a tear. 

Lacrimabund-U8, a, um, tear/ul, sor- 
rowful. (Lacrima.) 

Lac-U3, US, m., a lake. 

Laedo, laesi, lacsum, laed-6re, to injure, 
hurt. 

Laesur-US, a, nm, fut.part. art. 0/ laedo. 
Laes-US, a, um, per/, part. 0/ laedo. 
Laet-or, fitussum, ari, to rejoice, be glad. 
Laet-US, a, um,jopful, glad; fertile, rirh. 
Laev-US, a, um, left, on the left hand; 

lucky: also ill-omened, unlucky, 
Lagon-a, ae,/, ajlagon. 
Lamb-0, i, gre, to lick, to lap. 
Lan-a, ae, /., wool 

Languid-US, a, um, languid,faint,U!eak. 

(Langueo.) 
Lanifici-um, i, «., the working of wool; 

spinning, weaving. (Lana, facio.) 
Laniger, IfinlgCr-a, lanlg6r-um, wool- 
bearing, woolly; as subs t., a sheep, lamb. 

(Lana, gero.) 
Lani-0, avi, stum, are, to tear. 
Lanio, lanlon-is {or lani-us, i), m., a 

butcher. 
Lapide-US, n, um, of or belonging to 

stone, made of stone, stone. (Lapis.) 
L&pis, lapld-ls, ?»., a stone. 
Late, adv., widely, extemively. (Latus.) 
Lat-eo, ui, ere, to lie hid, be concealed; 

to lurk ; to escape notice. 

Latibul-um, i, a, a iurUng-place, den. 
(Lateo.) 

Latin-US, 1, m., a Latin: pi, the latins. 
Lati-um, i, n., Latium, a division of Italy. 
Latro, latron-js, m., a robber. 
Latr-0,-ayi, tttum, are, to bark. 
Lat-us, a, um, broad, wide, spacious. 
wit-UB, a, urn, Kptrf.part. eftwo,) car- ' 
ried, brought, dx. I 



L&tus, lflt?r-ls, n., aside, fiank. 
Laudat-US, a, um, praised; (perfpart 

of laudo.) 
Laud-0, avl, atum, Bro, to praise, com- 
mend, express adm i ■ uion of. (Laus.) 
Laure-a, ae,/, a bmj tree, laurel 
Laurenti-a, ae,/, Laurentia. 
Laus, laud- is,/, praise, glory. 
Lav-0, lavi {or lavavi), lautum, lOtum 
{or lavatum), lavgro {or lav4re), to 
bathe, wash, cleanse. 
Lax-0, avi, atum, fire, to make loose, 

loosen; unbend; set free. (Laxiis.) 
Lax-us, a, um, loose; wide, open. 
Legatio, logatiOn-is, /., an embassy. 

(Lctjatus.) 
Legat-US, 1, m., an ambassador ; a lieu- 
tenant-general; a deputy. (Logo.) 
Legio, iCgion-is, /, a legion, a divmon 
of the Roman army, containing from 
4000 to COCO men. 
Leg-0, avi, atum, are, to send us umbos- 

sudor ; intrust to ; bequeath. 
Leg-0, legi, ledum, liig-ere, to luy iti 

order; choose; read. 
Len-is, is, e, smooth, gentle. 
Lent-US, a, um, tough; pliant; slow, 
tardy. 
j Leo, leOn-is, m., a lion. 
Lepus, Iep6r-i9, m., a hare. 
Letal-is, is, e, deadly, fatal (Lgtum.) 
Let-um, i, «., death. 
Lev-is, is, e, light. 
Lev-is, is, e, smooth, polished. 
Lev-0, avi, atum, fire, to lift up, raise; 

lighten. (Lfivis.) 
Lex, leg-is,/, law. 
Llbenter, adv., wUUngly. 
Liber, llibr-l, m., a book. 
Liber, liber-a, llber-um, free. 
Liberal-is, is, e, noble, generous, liberal 

(I.Iber.) 
Liber-i, omm, m. pi, children. 
Liber-0, avi, atum, are, to set free, liber- 
ate. (Liber.) 
Libertas, llbertat-ls,/, liberty. 
Libet, impers. verb, it pleases. {See p. 
97, 6.) 

Libido, {or lUbido), llbldln-is, /, plea- 
sure, desire, lust (Llhet,) 

LIcenti-a, ae,/, leave, permission ; bold- 
ness,' licentioumess. (Ucbt) 



216 



LATIN VOCABULARY. 



I 



' 




Licet, impers. verb, it is permitted; it it 

lawful. (See p. 97.) 
LictOT, Ilct5r-i8, m., a lictor, an officer 

H-ho accompanied certain Roman magis- 
trates. (Lljifi), to hiniL) 
Lign-lim, i, n., wood, timber. 
Llg-0, iivi, utum, arc, to bind, tie. 
XigO, llgoii-ifi, m., a mattock, spade, hoe. 
lim-a, ais /, a file. 

Limcn, liiuln-is, n., a threshold, entrance. 
Lim-US, I, m., mml, slime. 
LingU-a, ae, /., a tongue ; language. 
Liliq.UO, llqui, [lictum,] linquere, to 

leave, abandon, desert. 
Liquid-U8, a, um, dear; bright, limpid. 
Liquor, llquOr-is, m., liquor; water; 

char surface. 
Lir-a, ae, /, a furrow: hence, dcliro (dc- 

lirus), to be silly. 
Lis, lit-ls,/., stiife, a quarrel; law-snit. 
Liter-a, ae, /., a letter of alphabet, chm-ac- 

ter.' in pi., letters ; literature; an epistle. 
Lit-US, oris, n., the shore. 
Livi-V\S, i, m., Livius, (proper name.) 
LoC-O, avi, atum, ave, to place, set in 

position; let out for hire. (Locus.) 
Loc-US, i, a place, region: pi., loci (m.), 

or loca (n.) 
Longe, «(/»■, far, afar ; for a long time; 

very much. (Loii^us.) 
Long-US, a, um, long, tall; tediotts. 
Xdc[UOr, lOcQtus sum, loqu-i, to speak, say. 
Lubet, i>r libet, (wltich see.) 



Ltlci-US, 1, m., Lucius, (proper name.) 

Lucreti-a, ae, /., Lucretia, (proper 
name.) 

Lucr-um, l, n., gain, profit. 

Luct-US, us, m., griff, sorrow. (Lngeo.) 

Luc-US, i, m., a grove, wood. 

Ludibri-um, i, «., « mockery; jesti 
sport; scoff. (Ludu.s.) 

Ludicer, v., luUlcr-us, a, um, sportive: 
pi, ludicni, games. (Ludus.) 

Ludo, lusi, lUsum, lud-eie, to play, sport. 
(Ludus.) 

Lud-US, i, m., a play, sport, game; a 
school: ludus liteiaruni (or literarius), 
an elementary school. 

Lugeo,lQxi, [luctum,] lug-5rc, to lament, 
bewail, mourn. 

Lumen, lumtn-is, n., light. 

Lun-a, ae, /, the moon. 

Lup-a, ae, /., a she-wolf. 

Lup-U i, i, m., a wolf. 

Luscini-US, i, m., (or lusclnl-a, ae, /,) 
a nightingale. 

Lustr-O, avi, fitum, are, to examine, sur- 
vey, review; search; traverse. (Lust- 
rum.) 

Lux, luc-is,/., light: j>\ima,\uvv, at dawn, 

Luxuri-a, ae,/, (luxuri-es, el,/.,) lux- 
ury, voluptuousness. 

Lux-US, u.s, m., extravagance (in mndt 
of life) ; luxury ; effeminacy ; splmdoar, 
pomp. 

Lymph-a, ue, /., dear water. 



M. 



M., abbreviation fof' Marcus. 

Macedo, Mac6d6n-is, m., a Macedonian. 

Maci-es, ei, /., wasting, consumption; 
leanness. (Maceo, to be lean.) 

Ilaer-eo, (or moerco,) ere, to be sorrow- 
ful, to grieve. 

Maest-US, a, uin, sotTowful, mournful, 
grieved; (perf. part, o/maereo.) 

SIa>3^is, adv., more, rather. 

Magister, m5gisti-i, m., a master; chief 
man; ati instructor. 

Magistrat-US, us, m., a magistrate, 
chi^ officer; also, magistracy. (Magis- 
ter.) 

Magnifice, adv., splendidly, magnifi- 
cently. (.Magniflcus ) 

Hagnitudo, magnltudln-is, /., great- 

neii, Trmgiliiiide, size. (sla^U'dS.) 

ALagU-U6, a, um, great, large. 



Majestas, majestat-is, /, mc\jesty, dig- 
nity ; grandeur, (Magnus.) 
Major, major, majus, (compar. of mag- 

luis,) greater. (See p. 37, 5.) 
Male, adv., badly; severely. 
Maledlc-O, maledixi, &c., (,«e Dlco,) to 

speak ill of, slander, abuse. (Male, 

dico.) 
Mallti-a, ao, /., badness, wickedness; 

ill-will, malice. (Mains.) 
Malo, malui, malle, (see p. 92,) to be 

more willing; prefer. (Magis, volo.) 
Mal-um, i, «., an evil, an ill, a mi^or- 

tune; plague; wickedness. 
Mal-um, i, n., an apple. 
Mal-US, a, um, bad, wicked; wretdicd, 
Mal-US, i, /., an apple-tree. 

Mamiii-US, 1, »<■, JJamUius (Tusfulcn'jLt,) 



L-iTlN VOCABULARY. 



217 



Urandat-um, 1, n., a commission, eom- 

mandf ordtr. (Mando, to intrust.) 
M^neo. miinsi, mansum, man-ci'c, to re- 

'yiain, utai). 
Manifest-US, a, um, evident, plain, 

man if I'M, 
Manli-US, i, m., Mnnllus. 
M8.n-US, us, /, a hand; a band of sol- 
diers. 
Marci-US, 1, m., Marciiu (_Anciis). 
Marc-US, i, wu, Marciu. 
Mar-e, is, n., t/ie sea. 
MargO, inarjclii-is, m. or /, an edge., 

viarc/iii, brink, 
Maritim-US, a, um, belonging to the sea, 

maritime. (Maic.) 
Marit-US, 1, m., a married man, a hus- 
band. (Mas.) 
Mars, Mart-is, m., Mars, god of tear 
Mas, mar-is, m., a male; mate. 
M&ter, matr-is, /., a mother. 
Materi-a, ae, /., or materl-cs, 5i, /., 

matter, material; source. 
Matron-a, ae, /., a married woman, 

matron, wife. (Mater.) 
Matur-0, avl, atum, are, to hasten. 
M5,tQr-US, a,um, ripe, insea.ion, mature. 
Maxime, adv., most especially, chiefly; 

very highly. (Maximus.) 
Maxim-US, a, um, (superl. of magnus,) 

greatest, very great. 
Medicin-a, ae, /, tfie physician's art; 
medicine ; surgery ; a remedy, or cure. 
(Medicus.) 
Medic-US, i, m., a physician, doctor. 

(Medcor, to heal.) 
Medi-US, a, um, middle; middling. 
Mehercule, or Mehercules, By Jlcrcales ! 
Mel, iimll-is, «., honey 
Mel-OS, i, w., a song. 
Melior, melior, melius, better; {compar. 

0/ bonus.) {Seep. 37, 5.) 
Membr-um, l, n., a limb, member. 
Memini, meminlsse, preteritive verb, 

(sec p. 95,) I remember. 
Memor-0, avi, atum, are, to call to mind; 

relate, tell. (Memor.) 
Menenl-US, i, m., Menenius (Agrippa.) 
Mens,ment-is,/, the mind, the intellectual 

faculty. 
Mens-a, uc,/, a table. 
Mens-is, is, m., a month. 
Mentio, mentiOn-is, /, a calling to mind; 
mention, notice^ 

Mentior, mentltus sum, menfiri, to 
prove one's self false; deceive, lie. 



Merc3,tOi*, mercatOr-ls, m, a mcrclumt 

(Meiicor, to trade; from merx.) 
Merces, merceU-is, /, a reward; wages 

(MCTX.) 

Mercuri-U8, i, m., Mercury, messcn<;er 

of the gods. 
Mer-eo, ui, Itum, Src, (or dep. mcreor,) 

to earn, gain, descne. 
Merg-0, mersi, meii<um, merp-Cre, to 
plunge into, dip, sink, submerge; drown. 
Meridi-es, ei, m., mWay, noon. (Muv- 

us, pure; dies.) 
MeritO, adv., deservedly. (Meritus.) 
Merit-um, i, n., a deserving action, goml 

deed, a benefit, service. (Mereo.) 
Mers-US, a, um, .wnk; drowne<l, Jkc; 

(perf. part. o/merRo.) 
Merx, mcrc-is, /., merchandise, wares. 
Metior, mensus sum, metiri, to measure, 

mete. 
Metu-0, 1, (a)tum, gro, to fear, dread. 

(Metus.) 
Met-US, us, m.,fenr, 
Me-US, a, um, my, mine. 
Mi, contracted for milii, d<it. o/cgo. 
Mi, voc sing. masc. o/meus. 
Mic-0, ui, are, to move qutcnly, dart; 

quiver; flash, glitter. 
Miles, millt-Ls, m., a soldier. 
Militar-is, is, e, belonging to a soldier, 
or to war; warlike, militJiry. (.Miles.) 
Militi-a, ae, /, military service, war: 
domi militiaeque, at peace and at war; 
at home and abroad. (.Miles.) 
Mille, card, num., indecl. in sing., a thou- 
sand: pi. mllli-a, (or milia,) um, bus, itc. 
Min-ae, arum,/, threats. 
Minerv-a, ae, /, Minerva, goddess of 

wisdom, etc. 
Minime, adv., the very least ; by no 

means, not at all. (Jllnlmus.) 
Ministeri-Um, i, n,, attendance, service. 

(.Minister.) 
Mlnistr-O, avi, atum, are, to serve, 

attend, wait upon. (Sliuister.) 
Min-or, atus sum, ari, to threaten. 

(Minae.) 
Minor, minor, minus, (compar. of itarv' 

us,) less, smaller. (See p. 37.) 
Minus, neut. o/ minor, and adv., less. 
Mirabil-is, is, e, worthy of adinimluin; 

wonderfuL (Mhor.) 
Miracul-um, i, «., a wonderful thing, 

t-n.-aisr ; m.irach. (.Miru-.) 
Mir-or, atus sum, arl, to wonder at: ad 
mire. 



218 



LATIN VOCABULARY. 



Imir-TIB, a, um, wonderful, extraordi iry. 
Misceo, mJscui, mistum, (or mixtani), 

mlsc-ere, to mix, mingle; confuse. 
Miser, mlsei-ii, um, teretcheJ, mmrable; 

pitiable; pitiful 
MIser-eo, ui, uum, gre, (same as mlser- 

eor,) to pit}/, f el sorrow for. (Miser.) 
Misereor, miscM itus (or misertus) sum, 

misCr-eri, to pity. 
Miseret, impers. verb, it pities. (Miser.) 

(See p. 97, 4.) 
Misericors, gen. miserlcord-ls, a(lj., 

tender-hearted, compassionate, merciful. 

(Jliser, cor.) 
Miserit-U3, a, um, having pitied, (perf 

pari, o/ misereor.) 
Miss-US, a, um, sent; (perf. part, of 

mitto.) 
Mitig-0, avi, atum, are, to make mild, 

mitiijale, assuage. (Mitis, iiko.) 
Mlt-is, is, e, mild, mellow, gentle. 
Mitto, misi, missum, mitt-fire, to throw, 

cast ; send ; utter. 
ModO, culv., only ; just now; lately. 
Mod-US, i, "i-i measure, limit; tnanner, 

way, mode. 
Uoeni-a, um, n. pi, ramparts, fortifica- 
tions, walls. (Munio.) 
Moereo. (-See Maereo.) 
Moest-US. {See Maestus.) 
Molest-ua, a, um, trottblesome ; burden^ 

some, oppressive; annoinng. (Moles.) 
Molior, molitus, mOl-iri, to prepare 

(with labour); strive; throw; build; 

contrive. (Moles.) 
MoU-io, ivi, Uum, Ire, to soften, miti- 
gate; tame. (Mollis.) 
Moll-is, Is, e, aoj?'., soft, tender; weak. 
Mon-eo, ul, Uum, ere, to warn, advise; 

instruct. 
Monil-e, is, n., a necklace, collar. 
Mona, mont-is, m., a mountain. 
Monstr-O, avl, atum, are, to point out, 

show. 
M6r-a, ae, /, delay. 
Morb-U8, i, WJ., disease, sickness. 
Mordax, gen. mordac-is, adj., biting, 

cutting. (Mordeo.) 
Mordeo, mfimordl, morsum, mord-ere, 
to bile, nij>, sting ; backbite ; pain. 



MSrior, mortuns sum, m5ri, to die. 
M6r-or, fitus sum, ari, to delay, linger, 

trifle. (MOra.) 
Mors, m.)rt-ls,/, death. (Morior.) 
Mors-US, us, m., a bite, sting, ice. 

(Mordeo.) 
Mortal-is, is e, svl^eet to death, mortal: 

as siibst., 7nan. (M(irs.) 
MortU-US,' a, um, dead; (perf part, rj 

morior.) 
M6s, mor-is, m., custom, habit, manner: 

pi, mores, conduct, character. 
M6t-US, us, vu, movement, motion. 

(Moveo.) 
Moveo, m5vi, m5tum, m5v-5re, to put 

in motion, move ; excite, stir up. 
MOX, adv., by-and-by, soon ; immediately ; 

at an after-time. 
Muci-U8, i, in., MuciuM (Scaevola). 
Mul-a, ae, /., a she-mule. 
Mulcat-U8, a, um, maltreated, mauled; 

(perf. part, o/mulco.) 
MulC-O, (or muleto, or multo), uvi, 
atum, are, to punish, fine; maul, mal- 
treat. (Multa, or mulcta, a fine.) 
Mulier, mulier-is, /., o woman, wife. 
Multitude, multitudln-l8, /, a multU 
tude, a great number, a mob, crowd, 
(Multua) 
Mult-0, (or mulot-o,) see Mulco. 
Multo, adv., by much; much, far; long 

(of time.) (Multus.) 
Mult-um, adv., much, greatly. 
Mult-U8, a, um, much, great: in pi, 

many. 
Mul-U8, i, m., a mule. 
Mund-U8, i, m., the world. 
Mun-io, ivi, itum, ire, to fortify, defend. 

strengthen, 
Munit-US, a, um, perf part, of munlo. 
Munus, mungr-is, n., an office, dignity; 

duty; favour; gift. 
Mur-US, i, m., a wall 
Mus, mflr-is, m., a mouse. 
Mu8C-a, ae,f.,afly. 
Mustel-a, ae, /, a weasel 
Mut-0, avi, atum, are, to change, alter. 
Mut-US, a, um, dumb, speechless. 
Myrt-U8,i,/, a myrJ^ 



LATIN VOCABULATIY. 



219 



N. 



I 



Nact-UB, a, nm, having procured; {per/. 

part. 0/ uanciscor.) 
Nam, rory'., for. 
NaUKJue, conj.,for. 
Nanciscor, nactua sum, nanclsci, to get, 

procure, obtairu 
Kar-is, is,/., a nostril: pi, rares, t?ic 

nostirs; the no.^e. 
Narratio, naiTatiOn-ls, /., a narrative, 

story, tale. (Narro.) 
Narr-O, uvi, atum, are, to tell, relate. 

(From (f-narus, knowing.) 
IfaSCOr, iiatus sum, niiscl, {dep. 3,) to 

spring from ; to be burn. 
Uat-a, ae, /, a daughter ; (/em. 0/ par- 

ticip. imtus, a, uin.) 
Nat-0, avl, atum, are, to swim. (No) 
Natu^ abl. 0/ nat-us, us, ?«., bp birth; 
(used in the phrases, major or fliiuor 

natu, ttc., older, younger.) 
Natur-a, ae, /., nature ; disposition. 

• Nascor.) 
Nat-US, i, m., a son; (masc, 0/ nat-us, 11, 

um.) 
Nat-U8, a, um, bom; (per/, part. 0/ 

nascor.) 
Naut-a, ae, m., a sailor ; (contracted /or 

iiavita, /rom navis.) 
Navig-0, avi, atum, Sre, to manage a 

ship; sail, navigate. (Navis, ago.) 
Nav-is, is, /., (accus., em or im; abl., e 

or i), <mship. 
Navi-UB, (Acci-us), i, vu, Navius. (See 

Accius.) 
Ne, coi\j., (= ut, non), that not, lest. 
Ne, adv., not. In prohibitions, with im- 
perative or subjunctive, 
"^Q^'interrog. adv., whether or no? It is 

always attached to some word, as, 

Amasne, do you love? Nonne, is it 

not? 
Nec, '^ T neque,)— et non, and not, nei- 
ther ; nec — nec, neither— nor. 
Necessitas, necessitat-is, /., necessity, 

need. 
NeC-0, avi (or ul). atum, are, to put to 

a violent death, till, slay. (Nex.) 
Nefast-US, a, um, not holy; pro/ane; 

wicked; unlucky. (See F&stna.) 
Negligo, neglexi, negjectum, negllg- 

6re, to disregard; neglect. (Nec, 

Idgo.) 



Neg-0, Rvi, atum, are, to say no, deny 

(Xn, aio.) 
NegOti-um, i, n., bimness, employment, 

labour; an a fair; thing. (Nec, oti- 

um.) 
Nemo, (nemln-is), m. or/, no one. (Ne, 

liomn.) 
Nemoricultrix, nem6rlcultric-is, /, 

an inhabitant c/ the woods. (Nemus, 

Colo.; 
Nem6r6s-U8, a, um, /ull 0/ troodt or 

thicket.f, woody. (Nemus.) 
'Nem'pe, adv., /orsoolh; certainly, truly. 
Nemus, nOmOr-is, n., a grove, wood. 
NepOS, nCjiOt-is, m., a grandson. 
Neptun-US, i, m., Neptune, god 0/ t/te 

sea. 
Nequam, a<y. (indeclinable), good /o/ no- 
thing, worthless; duisolute. 
Neque, and - not, neither. (See Nec.) 
Nequ-eo, ivi, Itum, ire, to be unable. 

(Ne, queo.) 
Nequidquam, or ngqulcquam, adv., in 

vain, /ruitlessly. 
Nequis, ncqua, uCquod, w nequid, lest 

any. 

Nequiti-a, !;e, /., badness; worthless- 

ness ; profligacy. (Nequam.) 
Nesc-io, ivi, itum, ire, not to know, be 

ignorant. (Ne, sclo.) 
Nesci-UB, a, um, not knowing, ignorant. 

(Ne, scio.) 
Neu, adv. and conj., = et, ut, non, and 

that not, and lest. (Same as Neve.) 
Neuter, neutr-a, neutr-um, ndtlu^ (0/ 

two.) See p. 35, 8. (Ne, uter.) 
Neve. (See Neu.) 
Nex, ngc-is./, violent death; death. 
Ni, co7\j., i/not, unless. 
Nld-us, i, m., a nest, 
Kiger, nlgr-a, nigr-um, black, swarthy. 
Nihil, or nil, indecl. subst., n., nothmg. 

Full/ortn, nihilum. 
Nil, or nihil. (See Nihil.) 
Ifil-US, i, m., the Nile. 
iNImi-US, a, nm, too much, excessive. 

(Nimis.) 
Nisi, coTy'., 1/ not, unless, except. (Ni, 

si.) 
Nis-US, us, m., an exertion, effort, at- 
tempt. (Nitor.) 
Nit-eO, ui, e;e, to shine, glitter; be neat. 



220 



LATIN VOCABULARY. 



Nltld-US, a, nm, shiny, bright, glossy, 

sleek. (Nlteo.) 
NItor, nltOr-ls, m., brightness, splendour, 

glossiness. (Niteo.) 
in tor, nlsus, (,or nixus suiti,) nltl, to lean 

upon, press upon ; strive, exert one's self. 
Nix, ntv-ls, /., snow. 
Nix-U9, a, uiTi, per/, part, o/nltor. 
No, iiavi, natum, nitre, to swim. 
N6bil-is, is, e, well-known, (iio-tus,) fa- 

iiioiis; of high birth, noble. 
Nobilltas, noWlnat-is,/., celebrity, fame; 

high birth, nobility; the nobles (<« a body); 

generosity. (Nobilis.) 
N6c-eo, ui, Ituni, ere, to hurt, injure, 

damage; (governs dative.) • 
Nocturn-US, a, um, belonging to the 

night, nightly, nocturnal. (Nox.) 
NoctU, abl. {of old subst. noctus,) used as 

an adverb, by night. 
Nol-0, ui, nolle, to be unwUling. Tlio 

imper. noli is used with inf. of anotlier 

verb, to express a strong proliibition ; 

as, Noli putare, don't (for a moment) 

ImaRine. (Non, vole.) 
Nomen, nomm-is, n.. a name. 
Nomin-O, avi, atum, are, to name, call; 

appoint. (Nomen.) 
N6n, adv., not. 

Nondum, adv., not yet. (Non, dum.) 
Noune, adv., is tt not T (the answer 

' Yes" is expected.) (Non, ne.) 
NOSCO, novi, nOtum, nose- ere, to know. 
Noster, nostr-a, nostr-um, our, ours. 

(Nos.) 
N6t-a, ae, /., a mark (by which to know 

something), sigiu (Nosco.) 
N6t-US, a, um, well-knotm; (per/, part. 

0/ nosco.) 
Novaciil-a, ae, /., a razor. 
Novi, / knoi/}; (per/. 0/ nosco, used as 

pres.) 
Novist'iiiie, adv., most recently, very re- 

ceniiy, lastly, last 0/ all, at last. (Novis- 

simus, superl, o/uovus.) 



N8v-tl9, a. um, new, recent, frtslu 
Nox, noct-ls, /., nighL 
Nub-es, is,/., a cloud; covering. 
Nubo,nupsi, nuptum, nub-Cre, to marry; 

to be married to; (said of tlie female.) 

Governs dative. 
Nud-0, avi, atum, are, to make naked; 

strip; expose. 
Nud-U8, a, um, naked, bare; exposed. 
Null-US, a, um, (gin., nuUius,) not any, 

none. i>ee p. Sr,. (Ne, uUus.) 
Num, adv. interrog., whether or nol (the 

answer "No" expected.) 
Num-a, ae, m., A'wwto, second king of 

Rome. 
Numen, numtn-is, n., divinity, godhead; 

a deity. (Nuo.) 
Numer-US, i, m., number. 
Niiiuitor, Numltor-is, m., Numitor, 

grand/ather 0/ Ronmlm. 
Numm-U8, 1, m., (or nflmus, 1), money; 

a coin. 
Nunc, adv., noiv, already; as it is. 
Nunquam, adv., never: non-nunquam, 

sometimes. 
Nunti-0, (or nunci-o,) avi, atum, arc, to 

tell, report. (Nuntius.) 
Nunti-US, i, m., a messenger; a message; 

news. (Said to be contracted for novi- 

ventius, newly come.) 
Nuper, adv., lately; (contracted /or mvl' 

per, /rom novus.) 
Nupti-ae, arum, /., a marriage, vied' 

ding, nuptials. (Nubo.) 
Nur-US, us,/., a daughter-in-law. 
Nusquam, adv., nowhere. (Ne, us- 

quum.) f 

Nut-0, avi, iitum, are, to nod, waver.- 

(Nuo, to vod, as in abnno, renuo.) 
Niltrix,''nutric-is, /., a nu7-se, wet-nurse, 

(Said to be conlnicted from nutri-trix, 

from nutrio, to nourish.) 
Nux, nuc-is, /., a nut. 
Nyinph.-a, ae,/., a nymph. 



0, intetjeclion, 0! oh! 

Ob, v^ep. with accus., towards, against; 

on account 0/, /or. 
Obed-io, ivi, (or a,) Uum, ire, to obey; 

serve. (Ob, audio.) 
Ob-vO, ii, ttwr,, :re, to go towards, meet ; 

oppo*e; to die. (Ob, eo.) 



Object-US, a, um, opposed to; (per/. part. 

o/objiclo.) 
Objicio, obj5ci, objecfcum, ob]ic-6re, to 

throw to or be/ore ; expose. (Ob, jacio.) 
Obnoxi-US, a, um, liable to (puntsli^ 

tiient) : exposed to, subject to; pr'jin fo. 

(Ob, noxiuB.) 



\ 



lATIN VOCABULARY. 






221 



Obrft-0, I, (B^him, Sre, to cover over, 

burp; overwhelm. (Ob, ruo.) 
Obsecr-0, avl, atum, are, to beseech, 

entreat. (Ob. sacro.) 
ObsSquor, obsucOtus sum, obsj^qul, to 
follow after; attend on; comply mth, 
yield to, be obtdie^it. (Ob, sequor.) 

ObsSs, obsld-is, ?»i. or/., n hostage. 

ObsideOjObsCiU, obsessum, obsId-Ore, to 
invest, blockade, besiege. lOb, sedeo. ) 

Obsidi-0, obsidionis, /., a siege, block- 
ade. 

Obstlnat-US, a,iim. stubborn, obstinate 

unjlinrhing, difrrm uird. 
Obstrep-0, ul, Itum, gre, to make a 
noise against, dro'en with noise. (Ob, 
strcpo.) 

Obstupefacio, (*<•« Faclo), to bewilder, 
astonish, amaze. (Ob, stupco.) 

Obtemper-O, avl, atum, are, to comply 
u-ith, obey. (Ob, tempero.) 

Obtin-eo, ui, obtentuin, obtin-ere, to 
hold, possess 1 get, obtain. (Ob, teneo.) 

Obviam, adv., against; in the way of. 
(Ob, via.) 

Occasio, occasiOn-is, /, opportunity, oc- 
casion; crisis. (Occido.) 

OccaS-US, us, m., a falling down; setting 
(of sun, iScc); the west; death. (Oc- 
cido, to fall, set.) 

Occid-0, i, occisum, occid-(5rei to kill, 
slay. (Ob, caedo.) 

Occupat-U3, a, uin, petf. part, of oc- 
cupo. 

Occup-0, avi, atum, are, to anticipate; 
seize, take possession of, occupy. (Ob, 
capio.) 

OccuT-0, 1, occursum, occurr-2re, to run 
towards, to meet. (Ob, curro.) 

Ocior, 5cior, ocius, swifter, quicker. 

Octavi-a, ae,/., Octavia. 

Octavian-US, i, m., Octavianus (Au- 
gustus.) 

Ociil-US, i, m., an eye. 

Odi, odisse, (preteritive verb,) to hate. 
(Seep. 95.) 

Odios-US, a, um, hateful, odious. (Odi- 
um.) 

Odi-um, i, n., hatred, grudge. (Odi.) 

OfFero, obtnii, obiatum, oflferre, to pre- 
sent, offer. (Ob, fero.) 

OfFicin-a, ae, /., a workshop. 

Offici-um, i, «., duty, service. (Said to 
be contracted from opiftctum, from 
opitex, a worltman.) 

Offundo, oflfQdl. offQsum, offund-5re. to 



pour upon; spread over; overwhtlm. 
(Ob, fundo.) 
0fFu8-U8, a, um, perf. part, o/offunda 
Olim, adi\, at some time, (past or future;) 
formerly, once upon a time ; hereujter. 
Oliv-a, ae, /., an olive. 
Omen, Omin-is, n., a token, lign, indica- 
tion, omen. 
Omn-is, is, e, ailj., every, all. 
On8r-0, ilvl, atum, are, to toad. 
Onus, onOr-is, n., a load, burden. 
Opes, opum, / pi., resources; wealth. 

(See Opis.) 
Oper-a, ae,/., work, labour, service: dare 

operam, to exert one's self. 
Opis, gen. ; dat., 6pi, (very rare ;) accus., 
opem; abl., »^Q\— power, might; 
wealth; help. 
Oportet, impers. verb, it is necessary, it 
behoves, must, ought. See p. 97. (Opus, 
necessity.) 
Oppidan-US, i, m., a townsman. (Op- 

piduin.) 
Oppid-um, I, n., a town. 
Opporttin-US, a, um, convenient, suit- 
able, opportune. (Oh, opposite; portus, 
the haven.) 
Opprimo, oppressi, oppressum, opprlm- 
6re, to overpower; crush; kill; catch, 
surprise. (Ob, premo.) 
Oppugnatio, oppugnation-is, /, an as- 
sault, siege, storming (of a town.) (Op- 
puiriio.) 
Oppugn-0, avi, atum, are, to fight 

against, assault, storm. (Ob, pugno.j 
Optim-US, a, um, best, (superl. of bonus.) 

(Seep. 87.) 
Optio, option-is, /, choice: dare option 

em, to give a choice. (Opto.) 
Opus, op6r-is, n., a work, labour. 
Opus, indecL, n., need: opus est, it is- ne- 
cessary. 
Oratio, oration-is, /., speech ; power of 

speech ; an oration. (Ofo.) 
Orator, orator-is, m., a pleader, a public 

speaker, orator. (Oro.) 
Ordin-0, avi, atum, are, to put in order, 

aiTange. (Ordo.) 
Ordior, orsus sum, ord-iri, (dep.,) to 

begin, wukrtake. 
Orgetorix, Org6t6rtg-is, m.. Orge- 

tortx. 
Orior, ortus sum, <5r-iri, (dep.,) to arise, 

begin; spring from^ 
Omat-US, us, m., ornament: a l>adge; 
equipment. (Omo.) 



if 


I 


1 


■ 




■ 


1- 


m 


1 


m 



222 



LATIN VOCABtTLAnV. 



Om-0, Sri, fttum, ire, to adi>m, deck, 
ornament ; equip. 

Or-0, ivl, Atum, ftre, to beg, pray, en- 
treat. 

Ort-US, a, um, per/, part, of orlor. 

Ort-U8, us, in., the ruing (of the sun); 
east, (Orlor.) 

6s, Or-is, n., the mouth; a bill, beak; the 
face. 

Os, OSS-id, n., a hone. 

Os-culor, at us sum, arl, (dep. 1,) to kiss. 
(Osculum.) 

Oscul-um, i, a, a kiss. (Os.) 



Oltend-0, l, nstensum, (orostentam,) o» 

tend-6re, stretch forth ; show, exhibit 

(Ob, tondo.) 
Osti-a, lie,/, Ostia, the sea-port of Rum*., 

at the mouth of the Tiber, 
Otids-U.>, a, um, having abundance oj 

leisure ; .quiet ; idle. (Otium.) 
Oti-am, V "., ease; leisure; idleness; 

peace. 
Ovil-e, is, n., a sheep-fold. (Ovis.) 
Ov-is, Is, /., a sheep. 
Ov-0, avl, atum, iirc, to triumph. (Ovbi.) 
Ov-um, i, n., an egg. 



P. 



Pabul-um, i, n., fodder. (Pnsco, pS-vl.) 
P&C&t-US, a, um, perf. part, qf paco, 

and adj., pacified, subdued. 
Pac-0, Svl, iitura, are, to render peaceful, 

pactfy; subdue, (Pax.) 
Pact-US, a, um, having agreed; (perf. 

part, of paciscor, to agree.) 
Paene, culv., almost, nearlg. 
Pallid-US, a, um, pale, wan. fPolleo.) 
PS,lus, palQd-la,/., a mar«A,/ea 
P&l-US, i, m., a stake, pole, pale. 
Pan, Pan-Is, or Pi-n-os, m., Pan, god of 

shepherds; (accus., Pana.) 
Pand-O, i, pansum, and passum, pand- 

6 re, to lay open, expose to view. 
Pang-0, p6pTgi, pactum, pang-Cre, to 

establish, fix ; to bargain; agree. 
Pan-is, is, m., bread, a loqf. 
Par.ther-a, ao, /, a panther. 
Papaver, papavgr-is, n., a poppy. 
Par, gen. parls, a^j., (see p. 31,) equal to, 

on an equality with; alike; a match for. 
ParCO, peperci, (or pars!,) parsum, (and 

parcitum,) parc-6re, to spare; refrain 

from, forbear ; (governs dat.) (Tarciis.) 
P&rens, parent-is. m. or /, a parent, 

(father or mother.) (Pario.) 
Par-eo, ui, Itum, Cre, /') appear; obey. 
Fario, pCpGri, partum, pilr-cre, to briny 

forth, produce; get, frocure. 
Pariter, adv., equallii. 
Pamass-U3, 1, m., Parnassus, a moun- 
tain in Greece, 
Par-0, avi, atum, fire, to prepare, get 

ready; provide. 
Pars, part-is, /, apart, share, portion. 
Partior, partitus sum, part-ill, to divide, 

apportion, (Pars.) 
Partiir-io, Ivi, Itum, ire, to he about to 



bring forth ; to desire to bring fbrth. 

(Partus.) 
Fart-US, fls, m., a bringing forth; a 

birth, offspring. (Pario.) 
Part-US, a, um, obtained, procured; 

( perf part, of pario.) 
P&rum, adv., too little; little; not. 
Parvul-US, a, um, very Utile ; (dimin. of 

parvus.) 
Parv-US, n, um, smail, little, 
Pasco, pavi, pastum, pasc-6re, to feed, 
' pasture; nourish. 
Passer, passCr-is, m., a sparrow. 
Pass-US, a, um, dishevelled; scattered; 

(perf. part, o/pando.) 
Pastor, pastOr-is, tn., a shepherd, herds- 
man. (Paaco.) 
Past-um, supine o/pasco. 
Paten-a, (or patina,) ao, /., a flat dish, 

plate. (Patco.) 
P&t-eo, ui, 5ro, to lie open ; be exposed to; 

extend. 
Pater, patr-is, m., a father, ances'or; 

patrcs, senators, or ancestors. 
Patern-US, a, um, belonging to a father, 
Patiens, patient-is, (pres. part, of 

patior, and ad;.,) suffering; patient, en- 

durant, 
Patior, passus sum, p5t-I, (dep. 3,) to 

suffer, allow ; endure, submit to. 
Fatri-a, ae, /, native country. (Pater.) 
Patr-0, avi. atum, are, to perform, ac- 
complish, finish. 
Patul-US, a, um, wule-.%preading, broad. 
Pauc-i, ae, a,,fciu; afew. 
Paullatim, [or i-aulatlm,) adv., by de- 
grees. 

Paullo, adv., hyaUWc; nA.itiU. 
Pauper, gen., paupCr-is, adj., poor. 



LATIN VOCABULARY. 



223 



Panpertai, panportlt-ls, /., poverty. 
P&vens, imvent-is, a<(;., {and prtt. part. 

0/ ii&\to,) ftarful, timid. 
P&veo, pilvi, pav-ere, (obct^Vau/, to /ear, 

to drtad. 
Pavid-Ufl, a, um, timid. (Pavoo.) 
P4vo, pilvOn-U, m., apeacoct. 
Pavor, pftvOr-ls, m.,/«ar. (Pavco.) 
Pax, pac-l8, /., peaee. 
Peccat-um, l, n., an error, fault; tin. 

(Tfcco.) 
Pecc-0, ftvl, fttum, ire, to err; tin; 

commit a fault. 
Pecten, poctln-ls, m., a comb. (Pccta, 

to comb.) 
Pectus, pcct«r-la, n., the breatt ; heart. 
PScfini-a, ae, /, money. (Pecua) 
Pecns, pec6r-ls, n., a flock; cattle. 
P§C-US, Qdls, /., a head of cattle; a beast. 
Pellicio, pellexl, pellectum, pelllc-fiie, 

to entice, allure, coax. (Per, Ucio.) 
Ptll-is, l8,/i aikin, hide. 
Pello, pCpflU, pulsum, pcll-6re, to drive ; 

push; expel; rout. 
Pendeo, pependl, pensum, pend-Bre, to 

hang, be suspended; be imminent. 

(Pendo.) 
Pendo, pgpendl, pensum, pond-6re, to 

hang up; weigh; pay. 
PenitUB, adv., inwardly; thoroughly, 

entirely. 
Penn-a, ae, /, a feather. 
Peperci, perf. ind. act. of parca 
Peperi, perf. ind. act. of pailo. 
Per, prep, with accus., through; during; 

by, by means of; on account of, 
Per-a, ae, /., a bag, wallet. 
PeragO, perSgi, peractum, perag-8re, to 

go through with; traverse; perform, 

execute. (Per, ago.) 
Peragr-O, fivi, atum, are, to wander 

through, roam through, travevt . (Per, 

nger.) 
Percont-or, (or percunctor,) Stus sum, 

ari, {dep. 1,) to search or probe tho- 
roughly; to examine; inquire into. 
Percutio, percussi, percussum, percQt- 

ere, to strike through; slay, kill. (Per, 

quatio.) 
Perd-0, Idl, Itum, gre, to destroy, ruin ; 

lose. 
PerduCO, perduxl, perductum, perdue- 
fire, to Uad through, conduct. (Per, 

duco.) 
F6r§grin-U», a, um, foreign, strange, 

alien. (Per, ager.) 



Per-eo, ll, (Ivl,) Unm, !re, to go through; 

perish, die; be ruined. (Per, eo.> 
PerfSro, pertail, perUtum, p«rferr»>, 

to carry through, convq/; endure, suffer, 

(Per, fero.) 
Perfldi-a, ae, /, violation of faith; per. 

fitly, falsehood. (Perfldus.) 
Perf Id'US, «, \\m, faithless, treacherous. 

(Per, fldes.) 
Perfug-a, ae, m., a runaway, a de- 
serter. (Perfuglo.) 
PergO, penexl, perrectum, porg-6re, to 

go right on, proceed, advance, (I'er, 

rego.) 
PerlcIIt-or, fttus sum, ftrl, to incur dan- 

ger. (Perlculum.) 
Periclum, syncopated for periculum. 
PeriC&l-um, l, n., a trial; risk, danger. 
Perltur-U8, a. \\m,fut. part, o/pereo. 
Perlt-US, a, uu, txperiencedf tkUUd; 

clever. 
Perlustr-O, avi, atum, are, to range 

through, traverse; examine, survey. 
PermittO, permlsl, pennlssum, per- 

mitt-Cre, to send on ; let go ; surrender ; 

alloie. (Per, mitto.) 
PermSt-US, a, um, alarmed; (perf, 

part, o/permoveo.) 
Permoveo, perm5vl, permOtum, per- 

mOv-Sre, to move to the centre; exciu, 

arouse, alarm. (Per, moveo.) 
Permulceo, permulsi, permulsum, per- 

mulc-Sre, to stroke gently; soothe; 

please. (Per, inulceo.) 
Pemlci-es, ei, /., destruction; death; 

calamity. (Perneco.) 
Perpast-US, a, um, thoroughly fed; fat. 

(Per, pastus.) 
Perpauc-i, ae, a, very few. (Per, 

pauci.) 
Perpetud, adv., continually, constantly. 

(Perpetuus, from per and peto.) 
Pers-a, ae, m., a Persian. 
Perscribo, perscripsi, perscriptum, per- 

scrib-gre, to write fully; to write out) 

write at length, detail. (Per, scribe.) 
PersSquor, persecfltus sum, persfiqui, 

(dep. 3,) to follow qfler; pursue. (Per, 

sequor.) 
Persi-a, ae, (or Perse, Perses,) /, Persia. 
Persolv-O, i, persolutum, persolv-6re, 

to free entirely ; pay to the last farthing; 

explain. (Per, solve.) 
PerstringO, perstrinxl, perstrictum, 

perstring-ere, to seue tightly; check; 

reprove. (Per, strlngo.) 



234 



LATIN VOCABTjIj^ny. 



Permadeo, peMti/l«!. pemuftiium, pcr- 
BuAd-eic, to cunvtnee ; ptriumie. (I'ur, 
Bundeo.) 

Pertaesuin eat, («« p. 07, 4 ; per/, of 

pcrtaudut,) i( it duijuUing; it du- 

gu*tf. 
Pertr&hc, pcrtraxi, pcrtractum, per- 

trah-Cre, to drag through; protract, 

prolong. (Per, traho.) 
Perturb&t-U8, a, um, dismayed, terri- 
fied; ( per/, part, o/ peittirbo.) 

Perturb-o, avi, atum, aie, to disturb 

greatly ; cot\fu$e ; confound. (Per, 

turbo.) 
Perv8n-io, l, tum, ire, to come all the 

iray; arrive, reach. (Per, vciiio.) 
Pes, p6(l-l», HI., a/oot. 
PeS8im-US, a, um, the worst; superl. 0/ 

iiialus. (Seep. 37.) 
Pestllenti-a, ue, /., a plague ; destruc- 
tion. 
P8W), Ivl, Itum, 5re, to make/or; attack; 

seek, ask; covet. 
Petulans, gen. pgtniant-ls, ad;., /or- 

ward; petulant; insolent, saucy. (PCto.) 
Phaethon, Phaethont-ls, »«., thaethon, 

son 0/ Apollo. 
Fhilipp-i, orum, m., Philippi, a tovm 

of Macedonia. 
Phil5B5phi-a, ae, /., philosophy ; learn- 
ing. 
Phoeb-US, 1, m., Phoebus, the sun god. 
Pict-US, a, uin, painted; variegated; 

{per/part. o/piiiKO) 
Pietaa, pietrit-i3, /..yt/kJi affection; duty; 

piety. (Pius.) 
Figet, impers. verb, it grieves (me); I 

regret (See p. 97, 4.) 
Pignus, pign5r-i3, n., a pledge; wager. 
Pila, ae, /., a ball 
Pile-US, i, «>., a cap, hat. (Pllus.) 
Pil-US, i, m., a hair. 
PingO, pinxi, pictum, ping-Cre, to 

paint; embroider. 
Pin-UB, i, /., (2d Bed.,) or Qs, (4ih 

Decl.,) a pine-tree. 
Pisc-is, is, m., ajish, 
Pisistrat-U8, i, m., Pishtratus, 
Plac-eo, ui, Itttin, ere, to please. 
Placet, '«np«rs., it pleases; it is resolved. 
Placid-UP, a, um, calm, peac^l, gentle. 

(Placeo.) 
riac-0, avi, atum, are, to make calm, 

wothe, appease. 
Plane, adv., plainty, ciearly, evidently, 

ma'ufiitlj. (Fianus.') 



Pl&nSt-a, ae, m., a vattdering star ; a 

planet. 

Plan-US, a, uni, /(«<,• plain; lep*L 

Plebei-U8, a, um, belonijwg to t/ie plehx, 
plebeian; common. (Pletin.) 

Pleb-es, is, or JSl, or i, /, the pkbs, com- 
mon people, 

Plebs, plCbis, /., tame as plobcs. 

Plen-U8, a, um,/«//. 

PlQin-a, ao, /., down ; a small feather; 

plumage. 
Plures,plurc8, plura, tnore: (pi. of plus; 

compar. 0/ mult us.) 
Plurimum, adv., very much; videru 

■plnr\mi\m,to see most keenly. (Plurimus.) 
Plurim-US, a, um, the i.wst; very much; 

very many; (superl. 0/ multus.) 
Plfls, gen. plur-is, more; neid. of corn- 

par. of multus. (See p. 37, 6.) Also 

adv., more. 
Pocul-um, i, n., a drinking vessel, cup, 

bowl. (Hoot, I'O, to drink.) 
PoeiT-a, poemat-i», n., a poem. 
Poen-a, ao, /, satisfaction (for an in- 
jury;) pimishmenl ; fine : dare poenna 

to suffer punishment : sumere puenus, 

to inflict punishment. 
Poenitenti-a, ae,/., repentance. (Poen- 

itere.) 
Poenitet, impers. verb, it repents. Sa 

p. 97, 4 ; also p. 9!>, 9, (2.) 
Poet-a, ne, «!., a poet. 
PoUiceor, pollicitus sum, polllc-Bvl, 

(dep. 2,) to promise. 
Pompili-US, 1, m., PompQius (Numa.) 
Pom-um, i, n., fruit; i.e., small fruit of 

any kind, as ayipli's, berries, tigs, itc. 
Pondo, an indeclinable subst., a pound; 

(used in pi. :) also an adv , (really old 

ah\.,f by weight. 
PonO, p6sui, posltum, pOn-Cre, to place, 

set, lay ; lay aside. 
Pons, pnnt-is, w., a bridge. 
Popul-US, i, m., a people, nation ; com- 
munity. 
P6pul-US, i, /, a poplar-tret. 
Porcell-U8, i, m., (dimin. of porous,) a 

little pig. 
Porsen-a, ae, m., J'orsena (Lars), king of 

Clusium, 
Port-a, ae, /., a gate, door. 
Portend-0, i, portentum, poTtend-?re, 

to point out ; show b^orehavd, foretell 

(= protendo.) 
Pott-0, uvi, utuni, are, to curry, hear; 

ring. 



t\ 



r 



LATIN VOOABULAnV. 



226 



Port-tll, u«, m., nn entranef ; a harbour, 

haven. 
FO8CO, pOposrI, posc-Pre, to demand. 
F5ait-U8, a, utn, pUtced, settled; laid 

aside; (per/, part, o/pono.) 
FoiBUm, pOtui, poiMe, to be able. (See 

p. 80.) 
VOBt, prep, with aecut., (and adv.,) after; 

siitce; behind 
Posted, atlv., afterwards, hcreancr. 
P08t8r-i, onitn, m. pi., posterity, descend- 
ants. (See postcrus.) 
PostSr-UB, a, uin, next qfler, follomng: 

pi, posterL (Seep 37, 6.) 
Postquam, cot\i., q/ter that, since; 

when. 
Postrem-US, a, um, the last, (superl. of 
posterns:) ad postromuiii, at last. 
(See p. 37, 6.) 
Postridie, adv., the dap after, the next 

day. (Postcrus, dies.) 
Postiil&t-um, i, »., a demand. (Post- 

ulo.) 
Postiil-O, ftvi, atum, are, to demand, ask. 
Posttlmi-US, 1, m., Postumius, (Aulus.) 
FStens, gen. potent-is, ai^., (and part. 

0/ possum.) ai/e; powerful. 
PStestas, potestat-ls, /, power, aut?io- 

nty; influence; upportnnity. 
Poti-or, potltus sum, pot-Iri, (dep. 4,; 
to take possession of; get; possess. 
(Governs gen. or abL) 
PStJor, potior, potius, (compar. of potls, 
able,) vioreable, more powerful ; better, 
preferable. 
Potlt-US, a, uiii,^«r/ part. 0/ potior. 
Potius, neut. of potior, aUo adv., 

rather 
Prae, adv., or prep, with ahl, b(/orc 
Praeb-eo, ul, Itum, Sre, to hold out; 
give, afford, supply. (Prae-hlbeo, i.e., 
pr.ie, tiiibeo.) 
Praecedo, praccessl, praeces-sum, prae- 
c5d-ere, to go before; surpa^, excel. 
(Pr.ne, cedo.) 
Praecept-um, i, n., a command, order; 

adeice. precept. (Praecipio.) 
Praecipio, praecCpi, praeceptum, prae- 
elp.gre, to take beforehand; anticipate; 
to lay down rules foi ; to command. 
(Prae, capio.) 
Praecludo, praeclQsl, praecia.sum, 
praeclQd-ere, to shut in front, close; 
stop short; put a stop to; shut up. 
(Prae, claudo.) 
Praed-a, ae, /, booty, plunder. 

1.'2) 15 



Praedo, praodnn-Ii, m., a robber, pmn- 

(U-rer. (Praeda.) 
Praefect-U>, 1, m., an overseer; a com- 

mamter, governor . (PraeHcio.) 
Praefulgeo, praefulsl, praefnlK-Cre. to 

s/une brightly. (Piae, fulgeo.) 

Praegfuat-0, avi, atum, are, to taste ^ 

fore; tasteftrst. (I'rae, Kusto.) 
Praeli-Um, 1, «.. a battle, fight. 
PraemittO, praomlsl, praomlssum. 

praemlttCro, to send btfore, send for- 

ward; despatch. (Prae, mitto.) 
Praemi-um, I, 1., a reward, prize. 
Praerept-U8, a, um, snatched awnyf 

carried off prematurely. (I'raerlplo.) 
Praerip-io, ul, pracreptum, praerip. 

fire, to seiie before, or prematurely. 

Praesep-e, is, «., o stall; fold, pens 

manger. (I'rae, sepes.) 

Praesldi-um, 1, n., a protection, guard, 
d^enca; garrison. (Pracses, a pro- 
tector.) 

Praest-ans, gen. praestant-ls, a<y., 
(part, o/praosto,) surpassing, excellent; 
distinguished, 

Praest-O, Itl, ttum, or atum, fire, to 
stand before, surpass , to stand in front 
of, d^end; make good, fulfil, perform, 
pay; supply, afford (Pruc, sto.) 

Praesum, praeful, praeesse, to be over, 
to have in charge, command (Piao, 
sum.) 

Praeter, prep, with aceus., besides, ex- 
cept ; beyond, over and above. (Prae, 
and comparative termination -ter.) 

Praeterea, adv., besides. (Practer.) 

Praeter-eo, u, (for ivi,) itum, ire, to 
pass by, omit, neglect, forget. (Praeter, 
eo.) 

Praetext-a, ae, /., a Roman tunic (with 

a broad purple border.) (Praetcxo.) 
Prat-um, l, n., a meadow. 
Prav-US, a, um, crooked, distorted; 

perverse, wicked, depraved 
Prec-es, um,f.pl., entreaties; a prayer; 

request. (From obsolete prex, wlilcli is 

sometimes used in dat., accus., and 

abL sing.) 
Prec-or, atus sum, arl, (dep.,) to pray, 

entreat. (Preces.) 
Prehend-0, {shortened into prendo,) i, 

preliensum, prehend-Cra, to catch, 

seize, apprehend 
Premo, pressi, pressum, prfim-5re, to 

press upon ; cru.ih ; cliech : press hard; 

pursue. 



1 



r- 



226 



LA.TIN VOCABULARY. 



PrenB-U8,a, nm, {for ptohens-us; petf, 

part. o/prehon(lo,)caM!7/i<. 
PrSti-nm, l, n., price, value ; reward 
Pridie, ak/h., the day before. (Pi-, root 

Q/'prae, pro, ifec. ; anrfdles.) 
Primo, adv., at fret; in the first place. 
Prim5r-eS, um, in. pi., chi^men, nobles: 

pi. qf culj pilmOr-ia, Is, 0. (I'limus.) 
Prim-um, adv., first of all 
Prim-U8, a, um, ord. num., first; 

{superl. of piis or prae. See p. 38, 7.) 
Princeps, gen. prliiclp-ls, a((^, fore- 

most, ehi^: as subsi., a cfiitf man, 

prince. (Primus, capio.) 
Princi*)&t-us, us. m., chi^ power; 

sovereignty. 
Prior, prior, prius, {see p. 38, 7,) fanner, 

first of two ; {compar. of pris or prae.) 
PrisC-UB, I, m., Frisciu, (proper name.) 

a* common adj., old, ancient. 
Pristln-UB, a, um, fonner; primitive; 

old, ancient. (Prae, or priscuu.) 
PriUB, adv., before, fmvwrly; {neut. of 

prior.) 
Priusquam, eotv. or adv., before that. 

Somethr.es written separately, with 

one or more words intervening. 
Priy&t-UB, a, um, {p^f.part. o/prlvo,) 

deprived qf; deprived of a public office ; 

hence, in private station, private; indi- 
vidual, personal, one's otcn. 
PriV-0, avi, atum, are, to deprive of, 

bereave. (Prlvus.) 
Pro, prep, with abl, in front of, b^re, 

instead of; as ; for the benefit of. 
Pr5b-US, a, um, approved f; upright, 

honest. 
Pr5c-as, ac, m., Procas, one of the kings 

of Alba. 
Procaz, gen. procac-is, ac^., forward, in- 
solent; petulant. (Proco, to sue, beg.) 
Prdcedo, process!, processum, procGd- 

fire, to go forward, advance. (Pro, 

cedo.) 
PrScnl, adv., at a distance, far off. 
Procul-UB, 1, m., I'roculus, {proper 

■ name.) 
Pr6d-eo, li. Ovl,) Itum, !re, to go forth; 

come out, appear. (Pro, eo.) 
Prodlgi-um, l, «., an omen ; prodigy ; 

portent. (I'ro, and dig-, or die-, root 

of 6ico, (Sec.) 
Proditio, prOdltlon-ls, /., a giving up ; 

betrayal, treachery. (Prodo.) 
rzuuitcr, pri5uuor»i3. ffs. a fgs^or, be- 
trayer- (Proda) ^^ 



Pr5d-0, Tdl, ttum, 8re, tc give up, dtlirtf 

over, betray; abandon; to hand down, 

piihlish, declare. (Pro, do.) 
PrSdQcO, produxi, productum, prodflo- 

fire, to lead forth, bring out, prodtice; 

prolong. (Pro, duco.) 
PrSfecto, adv., in reality, truly, cer- 
tainly. 
Pr6fect-US, a, um, perf. part, of proflcls- 

cor. 
Profero, protnil, prolatum, proforre, to 

bring out, jyroJuce, discover, put forth, 

exhibit. (Pro, fero.) 
PrSfloisCOr, prfifectus sum, profioisci, 

{dep. 3,) to set out, depart; advance. 
Pr6fug-io, 1, Uuin, fire, to flee forward, 

or away; escape. (Pro, fugio.) 
Pl'dgSni-es, el, /, an offspring, progeny, 

brood. (Pro, and gen, root o/gigno.) 
ProgrSdior, progressus sum, pr .jigdl, 

to go forward, advance, proceed. (Pro, 

gradior.) 
Prohib-eo, ul, Itum, iSre, to keep off, 

prevent, restrain ; forbid. (Pro, liabeo.) 
Projicio, projed, projectum, projlc-6re, 

to throw forward; prostrate. (Pro, 

Jacio.) 
Prolabor, prolapsus sum, proiaiji, {dep. 

3,) to slide forward, slip; sink; fall. 

(Pro, labor.) 
Prol-es, is,/, off.tpring. 
Proloquor, prolocfttus sum, prolftqul, 

to speak out, say openly, declare. 
Promiss-US, a, um, perf part, of pro- 

mitto: barbti proniissa, a long {l.e., a 

hanging down) beard. 
Prdmitto, promisl, pronilssum, pro- 

niitt-Cre, to send forward; let Jiang 

down; to pronme. (Pro, mltto.) 
Pr6pe,'adw., near: also prep, withaccus. 

near to. (Comp. propius, nearer.) 
Pr5p8r-0, avl, atum, are, to hasten, be 

quick. (Properus.) 
Propcno, propSsui, pr5p5sltum, prOpSn- 

6re, to set b^ore ; propose ; intend ; de- 
clare. (Pro, pono.) 
Proposit-um, l, n., a purpose, project, 

intention; opinion; proposition. (Pro- 
pone.) 
Fropri-US, a, um, peculiar; own; spe- 

cial. 
Propter, prep, with accus., on account of 
Prorip-io, ui, proreptum, prorlp-fire^ 

to hurry forth, or onward ; to drag out 

(Fro, rapio.) 
Frdsequor, prOsecatus smn, pror^quL 



LATIN V«»CABTJLARY. 



227 



to follote onward ; accompany; convey; 
/ottoui up (a tuliject.) (Pro, sequor.) 

PrSspIcio, rrospexl, prospectum, pr5- 
splc-Cre, to look forward; watch; pro- 
vide for ; foraee. (I'ro, »p6cio.) 

Prosum, pioful, prodesse, to bf. of ser- 
vice to, to ben^t. Governs datlvo. (I'lo, 
Bum.) 

Prdtinns, adv., straight forward; forth- 
with, immediately. 

Pr6vldenti-a, ae, /, forethought, pro- 
vidence. (Piovldens.) 

Pr6v81-0, 5vi, atuin, are, to fly out, or 
forward; hasten on. (Pro, volo.) 

Proxim-US, a, um, nearest, next; 
(superl of prope,— *e< p. 38, 7:) in 
proximo, at the nearest point. 

PrQdenti-a, ae, /, (provldeiitia,) fore- 
sight, forethought, prudence, wisdom. 
(Pnideiis, t,e., provldens.) 

Publice, adv., publicly ; at the public ex- 
pense. (Publicus.) 

Public-US, a, um, belonging to the people ; 
public (POpulus.) 

Piidet, pudult, <tc, it ashames. See p. 
97, 4, and 98, 9, (2.) 

Piidor, piidor-is, jn., shame; modesty. 
(Pudeo.) 

Fuell-a, ae, /., a girl (From puellus, 
dimin. of puer.) 

Puer, puer-i, m., a boy; slave: in pi, 
children. 

Pueril-is, is, e, boyish, childish. (Puer.) 

Pueriliter, adv., childishly; foolishly. 
(I'uerilis.) 



?Ugn-a, «e, /, a *"tttle, fight. (Pug, 
root o/pnngo, pu-png-i.) 

Pugn-0, avi, atum, are, to fight. (Pug. 
nu.) 

Pulcer, pulcra, pulcrum, fair, beautiful 

Pulcher, pulclira, pulclirum, (or pulcer, 
pulcra, (fee.,) /air, beautiful 

Pulcherrime, adv., (superl of pulchrh,) 
most beautifully ; most nobly. 

Pull-US, 1, m., a young animal; a chirk- 
en; one of a brood, (Puellui, from 
puer.) 

Pulmentari-um, i, «., anything eaten 
with bread; relish; a dainty. (Pul- 
nientum, fi\>m puis, pultis, pap, or 
pottage.) 

Puls-0, avi, ahim, arc, to beat frequently ; 
knock at; beat, batter. (Fi'cquentativa 
from polio.) 

Puls-U8, a, um, petf, part, of pella 

Pulvis, pnlvCr-is, m., dust. 

PflniC-US, a, um, Punic, (Le., Cartha- 
ginian, or Phoenician.) 

Pdn-io, ivl, itum, Ire, to pvnish. (Poe- 
na.) 

Punior, punltus sum, puniri, (past, of 
piinio,) to be punished: (also dep.,) to 
punish. 

Punct-um, i, n., a prick, sling; punc- 
ture. (I'ungo.) 

Purg-0, avi, atum, are, to cleanse, clear; 
excuse; purge. (Puruni, ago.) 

Piir-US, a, um, clear, pure, unadulterated. 

Pute-US, 1, m., a well, pit. 

Put-0, avj, atum, arc, to think, suppose. 



Q., an abbreviation for Quintus, (P. name.) j 
Qua, adv., where, whither. 
Quadraginta, ccrd. num., forty. Indecl, 
Quadrans, quad-ant-is, vi., a fourth 

part, quarter; a farthing; a quadrans 

(fourth part of an as.) 
Quadrig-a,ae,/, and quadrlR-ae, arum, 

/ pi, a four-horse chariot. (Quadri- 

lugiie, from quatuor, jugnm.) 
QuaerO, quaesivi, quaositum, quaer-Cre, 

to seek, ask, 
Quaeso, qunesQmus, (defective verb), I 

pray, we pray. 
Quaestio, quaestlOn-is, /, an inquiry, 

examination, inquest. (Quaero.) 
Huaestor, quaestor-ls, m., a quaestor; 

pcymasttr. (Quaesitor, from quaero.) 



Qual-is, is, e, of what kind, such as. 

(Qiils.) 
Quam, adv., in what way, in wfiat degree; 

how : cu conj., as, than. 
Quamlibet, adv., as you please, at plea- 

sure; how much soever. (Quam, lib- 

et.) 
QuampTimum, adv., cu soon ta possible. 
Quanivis, adv., in what way, or as much 

as you will; however much; although. 

(Quam, and vis/rom volo.) 
Quandoquidem, adv., since indeed; 

seeing that. (Quando, quldein.) 
Quantum, adv., (neuter of quantus). 

how much ; as much as ; as far fu. 
Quai^plB, a, um, how much, how grrat; 

as ^Kch or as great as. 






228 



LATIN VOCABULARY. 




Qn&propteT, adv., on which account, 

wher^ort, why. (Quam, rem, propter.) 
Qa&re| adv., from what circumstance, 

whertfore, why. (Qua, re, abl. of res.) 
Quart-US, a, um, ord num., the fourth. 

(Quatuor.) 
Quasi, adv., at if, as though ; just at. 
Quatuor, card, num., four. (Sometimes 

written quattuor.) 
Que0,QuIvl, quitum, qu-!re, to be able, 
Quci t- IS, us, /., an oo* tree. (See p. 

26, 2.) 
Querel-a, ae, /., a complaint. (Qu6ror.) 
QuSror, questus sum, quSrl, (dtp. 3,) to 

complain, bewail. 
Qui, quae, quod, ret pron., who, which, 

that. (See p. 43, 9.) 
Qui, quae, quod, ind^. pron., what, 

which. Also interrog., whot wfialt 

which? 
Qui, adv., (old abL of q^ui,) ?iow, in what 

manner. 
Quia, con;'., because. 
Quicunque, quaectmqne, quodcunqne, 

whoever, whichever. (See p. 43, 9.) 
Quidam, quaedam, quoddam, indef. 

pron., certain one; tome (person or 

thing.) 
Quidexn, adv., indeed: na— quidem, not 

even. 
Quidni, adv., why not f 
QuieS, qulgt-is, /., rest, quiet, sleep. 
QuiesOO, quievl, qulStum, quiesc-Sre, to 

rett, be quiet. (Quies.) 
Quiet-US, a, um, quiet, peaceful; com- 

poted. (Quies.) 
Quln, adv., in what manner nott why 

nott how nott that not; but that; that. 

See note, p. 88. (Qui, ne, or non.) 
Quinam, quaenam, quodnam, interrog. 

pron., whot which f what, prayf who 

at allt 
Quingent-i, ae, a, card, num., five hun- 
dred. (Quinque, centum.) 



Quint-US, a, um, ord. num., J^fh. 

(Qulnquft) 
Quippe, adv. and conj-, certainly; in- 
deed; as being; since, inasmuch at. 

(Quia, pe; or, as others prefer, qui, 

pote.) 
Quiriual-is, is, e, belonging to Qui- 

rinus ; the Quirinal Hill. 
QuiliU-US, i, m., Quirinut, (Le., RomU' 

lus.) 
Quis, quae, quid, or quod, interrog. 

pron., whot which t whatt Also, in- 
def., any one, some one. 
Quisnam, quaenam, quldnam, who, 

prayt what, pray t what at allt 
Quisquam, quaequam, (quidquam,) 

quicquam, any one, any thing. 
Quisque, quaeque, quodque, or quidquo, 

every, each. 
Quivis, quaevis, lodvls, or quld\i8, 

any (person or thing) you please ; what 

you please. (Qui, via, from volo.) 
Quo, adv., in what place ; where, where- 

ever, anywhere: quo — co, by how much, 

by so much; in proportion as. 
Quo, adv., to what purpose; of what use; 

whither. 
Quo, cory., in order that, that. 
Quod, conj., because; that; since. 
Quodvis. (See Quivis.) 
Quominus, adv., so that not. 
Quondam, adv., formerly ; once upon a 

time. 
Quoniam, coiy., because; seeing that; 

since. 
Quoque, adv., also, too. 
Quot, indecl. adv., how many; as many as, 
Quotannis, adv., every year. (Quot, 

annus.) 
Quotldie, adv., daily, every day. fQuot, 

dies.) *• 
Qu5tieS, adv., how often ; as often as. 
Quum, (or cum,) c(wy., when, since, be- 

cause. 



R. 



£&di-UB, i, m., a staff, rod; ray; spoke 
(of a wheel), 

B&diX, radic-!s, /., a root ; base (of a 
mountain"^ 

Br&moS-US, a, um, abounding in branch- 
es, branchy. (Ramus.) 

Ram-US, l, m., a bramh, boughm, 

Ean-a, ae,/., a frog. " 



KapId-US, a, um, hurrying on; rapid, 

suiift. (Kapio.) 
R§.pln-a, ae, /., plunder, rapine, robbery. 

(Rapio.) 
Rap-io, ui, tnm, Sre, to seize hastily, 

snatch; drag; steal; hurry on. 
Bapt-U8, a, um, (perf. part, qf rapio,) 

se.ued, oarrted ojf. dec. 



LATIN VOCABULARY. 



229 



R&r-tlB, a, nm, scarce, rare ; (of nets,) 

tuide-nuthed ; few; here and there. 
Ratio, ration-is,/, a calculation, account; 

reasoning; reason; thought; manner. 
KauraC-i, orum, m. pi, the Rauracu 
Be-, or red-, a prefix used in compound 
words, iM'^ning 'back;' as, reduce, to 
lead back: hence it signifies (1) ^again ;' 
as, resume, to take again: (2) ^against;' 
as, resisto, to set one's self against: 
(3) '«»-,• Le., not; retendo, to unstretch, 
unbind; recludo, to open. 
Kecedo, recessi, recessum, recSd-Sre, to 

go back, retire ; give up. (Re, cede.) 
Recens, gen. recent-is, ac(/., fi'esh, new; 

recent. 
Recept-US, a, um, per/, part, of recipio. 
Recld-0, 1, recasum, recld-6re, to fall 

back again; recoil (Re, cado.) 

Recipio, recepl, receptum, reclp-6re, to 

take back; receive; recover, regain. 

(Re, capio.) 

RectS, adv., rightly, correctly. (Rectus.) 

Reot-um, 1, n., rifirW; rectitude; (neut. 

0/ rectus, perf. part, of rego.) 
Rect-OS, a, um, (perf. part, of rego, and 
adj., made straight;) right; upright; 
proper; jttst; good; wise. 
Rgctipgr-0, avi, atum, are, to get back, 

recover. 
Rectls-O, ivi, atum, are, to give reasons 
against; refuse, r^ect, renounce. (Re, 
causa.) 
Redd-0, Idi, itum, Sre, to give back, re- 
store; repeat; repay; render; cause. 
(Re, do.) 
Red-eo, ii, (ivi,) ttum, ire, to go back, re- 
turn. (Re, or red, eo.) 
RedlgO, redegi, rcdactum, rgdTg-6re, to 
drive back; bring back; reduce. (Re, 
ago.) 
Redintegr-O, avl, atum, are, to make 
whole again, renew ; rtfresh. (Re ; 
Integro, from integer.) 
RedHCO, reduxl, reductnm, redQc-5re, to 
lead back, bring back, restore. (Re, duco.) 
Refect-UB, a, um, perf. part, of reflcio. 
RefSro, rgtuli, relatum, referre, to carry 
or bring back ; report: referre pedem, 
to retreat. (Re, fero.) 
RSfert, impert. verb, it concerns. (Seep. 

98, 9, (1,) with note.) 
RSflcio, refSci, refectum, reflc-fire, to 

make again, renew; refU. (Re, facio.) 
sezug-io, 1, uuni, ere, lo five back ; 
escape; shun. (Re, fugia) 



Regi-a, ae, /, a royal house, (domos 

understood;) palace; court, (Rex.) 
Regill-U8, i, m., Regillus, a lake. 
Regin-a, ae,/, ag'ueen. (Rex.) 
Regi-US, a, um, kingly, royal; noble, 

(Rex.) 
Regn-0, firi, Stuni, are, to act the king; 

reign, rule. (Regnum.) 
Regpi-um, i, n., a kingdom; royal 

power, sovereignty. (Rex.) 
RIgO, rejl, rectum, reg-6re, to make 

straight; direct; rule. 

RegrSdior, regressus sum, rSgr6d-l, to 

go back, return; retreat. (Re, gradior.) 

Belabor, relapsus sum, relabl, (dcp. 3,) 

to slide back; fall back; retire; retreaL 

(Re, labor.) 

RSlat-US, a, um, r^erredto; reckoned 

among; (.perf. part, qf refeio.) 
Relict-US, a, um, left behind; remaining; 

(perf. part, o/relinqua) 
Religio, (or reUlgio,) reilgiOn-ls, /, re- 
verence for the gods; piety, rdigion; 
superstition; scruples of conscience; 
sacred or moral obligation. (From 
relego, to ponder car^/utty; or religo, 
to bind down.) 
Rellg-o, avi, atum, are, to bind fast, tie. 

(Re, ligo.) 
RelinqnO, rellqul, relictum, relinqu-Sre, 
to leave behind, abandon, give up. (Re, 
linquo.) 
RSliqoi-ae, arum, / pi, the leavings, 

remnants, remains. (Relinqiio.) 
Rellqu-UB, a, um, /^ over, remaining ; 

the rest. (Relinquo.) 
RemUner-O, avi, atum, Sre, to repay ; 

reward. (Re, munero.yhwi munus.) 
Rem-as, i, m., an oar. 
Rem-OS, i, m., Remus, brother of Romu- 
lus. 
RSpello, repfill, repulsum, repell-gre, to 
drive back, repel, repulse ; eortfute. 
(Re, pello.) 
Repente, adv., suddenly, all at once, 

(Itepens.) 
Rgper-io, i, tum, ire, to get back again; 

to find; invent, (Re, parlo.) 
Repet-0, ivi, Itum, 6re, to seek again ; 
go bade for; demand; demand restitu- 
tion for; repeat. (Re, peto.) 
Repl-eo, Svl, stum, ere, to fill up; fW. 
again, replenish. (Re, pleo, cu m im- 
_ pleo, compleo, ple-nos, &a) 
Aepiet-ua, n, um, jiHed with; (per/. 
part, of replea) 



230 



LATIN VOCABULARY. 




RcpSno, repOsul, repSsttiim, rep6n-Pre, 
to replace, restart ; lay up, keep sajdg. 
(Re, poiio.) 

£epOS0-O, rep5posc-l, r6posc-6re, to de- 
tnand back, demand restitution of; ask 
for, require. (Uo, posco.) 

R^prShend-O, l, reprehensum, repre- 
hend-6re, to seize again, regain; to hold 
back; reprove, censure. (Re, prehendo.) 

RepromittO, repromisl, Ac, (see Mitto,) 
to promise in return. (Re, promitto.) 

Eepuls-a, ae, /, a d^eat, repulse, rejec- 
tion, rebuff'; loss (of an election.) (Re- 
pello.) 

Repuls-US, a, um, beaten off, baffled; 
(per/, part, o/repeilo.) 

Res, rCl, /., a thing, matter, affair ; pro- 
perty; interest of; domestic affairs : res 
gestae, exploits, great deeds. 

Rescindo, rescldi, rescissum, rescind- 
6re, to tear or cut off; "' to break down, 
or up; repeal; destroy. (Re, sclndo.) 

Resldeo, rSsedi, resld-ere, to lit down; 
perch upon. (Re, sedeo.) 

ResistO, resttti, restltam, resist-Sre, to 
come to a stop, stand still, halt ; with- 
stand, oppose. (Re, sisto.) 

Resperg^O, respersi, respersum, reperg- 
6re, to spi'inkle all over, bespatter. (Re, 
spargo.) 

Respers-US, a, um, bespattered; {perf. 
part, o/respergo.) 

Resplcio, respexl, respectum, respTc- 
Cie, to look back; regard, respect. (Re, 
specie.) 

Respond-eo, i, responsum, respond-Sre, 
to promise in return; to reply, answer. 
(Re, spondee.) 

Respons-um, l, n., an answer, reply; 
utterance of an oracle. (Respondeo.) 

Respublica, relpublicae, /, a common- 
wealth, state. (See p. 34, 2.) 

RestitU-0, i, turn, fire, to establish again, 
renew; restore, rebuild, replace. (Re, 
statuo.) 

Ret-e, is, n., a net ; (abl, rete, or retl.) 

Retend-0, i, retensum, (or retentum,) 
ietend-6ie, to unbend, relax, slacken. 
(Re, tendo. See lie.) 

RStens-US, a, um, unbent, unstrung; 
(perf. part, o/retendo.) 

Retent-US, a, um, held back, detained; 
( perf. part, of retineo.) 

R|tIn-eo. ul, retentum, retin-Sre, to 
hold back, detain. (Re, teneo.) 

RitundO. ret&di, rotOaum, retund-dre, 



to hammer back, to beat back;tcAe the 
point off, biiut; weaken; restrain; 
humble ; refute. (Ke, tundo.) 

Revert-0, i, reversum, revert-6re, to 
turn back, return. (Re, veito.) 

Reverter, reversus sum, reverti, (dep.,) 
to return, turn back. (Reverto.) 

Revoc-0, ari, atum, are, to call back; 
invite in retutrt; recall. (Re, voco.) 

Rex, r§g-is, m., a king, prince, chief. 
(Rego.) 

Rhe-a, ae, /., Rhea, (Silvia,) motlier of 
Romulus and Remus. 

Rhen-US, i, m., the river Rhine. 

Rid-eo, risi, risum, rld-Sre, to laugh, 
laugh at ; mock. 

Rlg-eO, ul, ere, to be stiff; to be numb. 

Rip-a, ae, /., a bank (of a river) ; mar- 
gin, edge (of the sea, <tc.) 

Rite, adv., duly, according to proper 
ceremony. 

RIt-UB, us, TO., a religious ceremony; 
usage, etiquette. 

RiV-US, i, m., a river, stream. 

Rix-a, ae,/., a brawl, quarrel, squabble. 

Rodo, rOsi, rOsum, rOd-5re, to gnaw, eat 
away: backbite. 

R5g-0, &vi, atum, are, to ask, beg, entreat. 

Rom-a, ae, /., Rome, 

Roman-US, i, m., a Roman; or adj., 
Roman. 

Rdmul-US, t, TO., Romulus. 

Rostr-um, i, n., a bill, beak; the beak 
(of a ship.) (Rodo.) 

R5t-a, ae,/., awheel 

Rdtund-US, a, um, round, circular. 
(Rota.) 

Rfid-is, is, e, untK'ought, untilled, un- 
polished, untaught, uncivilized; raw; 
unskilled; uncomely. 

Rug5s-US, a, um, full of wrinkles, 
wrinkled. (Ruga, a wrinkle.) 

Ruin-a, ae,/, a downfall; ruin, destruc- 
tion. (Ruo.) 

Rumpo, rupi, ruptum, rump-6re, to 
burst, break ; destroy. 

Ruo, ml, riitum, (roitum,) ru-Sre, to 
fall down, tumble. 

Rflp-es, is,/., a rock. 

Rupt-US, a, um, perf. part, o/rumpa 

RutSUB, and rursum, adv., again. 

RtLs, iiir-is, n., the country: a farm: rura, 
fields. 

Ruacio-UB, a, um, belonging to the coun- 
try, rustic, rural I as subst., a country- 
man. (Hus.) 



LATIN VOCABULARY. 



231 



a 



8&bln-ni, i, m., a Sabine: pi, Sabinl, 

the Sabines. 
SaCC-U8, I, m., a sack, bag. 
S&cer, sacr-a, sacr-um, sacred, holy ; de- 
voted; accursed: sacra, r». pi, sacred 
rites. 
S&cerdos, sacerdat-is, m. or /, a priest, 

priestejs. (Sacer.) 
S&crlfici-um, i, »., a sacr.tict (Sacri- 

fico.) 
Saepe, adv., often; compar., saeplus; 

superl, saepissime. 
Saev-io, il, (ivl,) Itum, ire, to exercise 
cruelty ; to rage, be savage, be furious. 
(Saevus.) 
8aevtti-a, ae, (and saevitl-es, ei,) /, 
cruelty; harshness, severity; rage. 
(Saevus.) 
Saev-US, a, um, raging; cruet; harsh; 

fierce, 
Sagax, gen. sagac-ls, adj., wise, knowing. 
Sal, sal-Is, m. or n., salt: in pi, sales, 

wit. 
Sali-i, orum, m., the Salii, priests of Mars. 
Sal-io, ui, or Ivi, (ii,) saltum, sal-ire, to 

dance, leap, bound. 

Salt-0, avl, fitum, are, to dance. (Salio.) 

Salt-US, us, m., a leap: also, amountain; 

a glade; glen; mountain pass; forest. 

(Sallo.) 

Saluber, and salubr-ls. Is, e, healthy, 

wholesome. (Salus.) 
Salus, salut-is, /., health, s(tfety. 
Salut-0, avi, atum, are, to ask after the 

health of; salute, greeU (Salus.) 
Salv-US, a, um, safe, well, strong; un- 
hurt. 
Sambuce-US, a, um, of or belonging to 

the elder-tree. (Sambucus.) 
Sanct-U8, a, um, sacred, holy. (Sancio, 

to make sacred.) 
S§.ne, adv., truly, indeed. 
Sanguis, san^uln-ls, m., blood; family, 

race. 
Sapiens, gen. saplent-is, ac(/., wise, pru- 
dent; (pres. part. </saplo, to be wise.) 
S&pienti-a, ae, /., wisdom. (Sapiens.) 
S&por, sapOr-is, m., taste, relish. (Sapio, 

to taste.) 
SarcIn-fL, ae. /.. a bttrden. Innd^ bundle, 
8&tii0, ivi, atom, &re, to satiate, satt^. 
(Satis.) 



Satis, adv., enough, sufficiently. 

Sator, satOr-is, m., a father ; creator. 

(Sero; supine, satum.) 
Sauci-0, avi, atum, are, to wound, hurt. 
Sax-um, i, n., a stone, rock. 
Scal-a, ae, (usually in pi., scalae,) /., a 

ladder, stair, flight of steps. (Seando.) 
Scand-0, l, scaiisum, dcand-gre, to climb, 

mount, ascend. 
Scelerat-US, a, um, polluted by crime. 

criminal, wicked, abandoned; accursed: 

as subst., a wretch, miscreant. (Scelero.) 
Sceleste, adv. . wickedly, by crime. 
Scelest-US, a, um, villainous; regard- 
less; accursed; wicked. (Scelua) 
Scel-US, 8ris, n., a wicked action ; crime; 

heinous sin, enormity. 
Scilicet, adv., it is evident, it is pi, tin; 

of course, certainly; forsooth; namely, 

to u>it. (Sci, imperative of scire, to 

know; ond licet) 
Sc-io, ivi, (ii,) Itum, ire, to know. 
Scipio, scIpiOn-is, m., a staff, 
Scipio, ScipiOn-is, m., Scipio, (proper 

name.) 
Sciscit-0, avi, atum, Sre, or more usu- 
ally (dep.) Bciscitor, to inquire, ex- 

amine, (Scisco.) 
Scrib-a, ae, m., a tcriter, scribe, clerk. 

(Scribo.) 
Scribo, scripsi, scrlptum, scrlb-gre, to 

write, enroll; levy; compose, 
Scrtlt-Or, &tus sum, ari, to search into, 

examine, 
Scut-um, i, n., a shield (of oblong shape,) 

buckler. 
Scyth-a, ae, m., a Scythian. 
Secedo, secessi, secessum, 8€ced-gre, to 

go apart, withdraw, revolt, (Se, apart; 

cedo.) 

SSc-0, ui, turn, are, to cut, wound; lop off. 

Secum, (ie,, cum se,) with himself, A«t- 

seff, themselves, &c (See note §, p. 45.) 

Secundum, prep, with accus., next to, 

after, in the next place; according to. 

(Secundus.) 
Socund-US, a, um, following after, ae. 

cond; prosperous. (Sequor.) 
SSciir-is, is, /., an axe, hatchet. (Seco.) 

•J•^^•-••,li-M!I, t», luit, ^-Tcs ,-7x-j.-t tare, a,";. 

anxiom ; considering one's self *oft, (3«. 
cura.) 



-7X 



232 



LATIN VOCABULARY 




SScus, adv., otherwise. 

Sed, cot\}., but. 

8Sd-eo, 85dl, scssum, B5d-ere. to sit, 
settle. 

Sed-es, is, /., a seat, settlement; abode, re- 
sidence. (Scdeo.) 

B8dil-e, is, n., a seat, bench. (Sedeo.) 

Seditio, sedltlon-is, /, a putting apart, 
separation : hence^ an insurrection, mu- 
tiny, civil broil, sedition. (S5, apart; 
and do.) 

Sed-0, fivl, atum, are, to cause to sit 
down; settle; appease, check. (Sedeo.) 

Seduco, seduxi, &c, (see Duco,) to lead 
aside, or npart; to draw away, separ- 
ate. (Se, duco.) 

Sediil-as, a, um, {fond of sitting ;) in- 
dustrious, diligent, sedulous. (Sedeo.) 

Seg[n-is, is, e, slow; indolent, slothful, 
lazy. 

Segreg-0, avl, atum lire, to separate 

fi-om tfie flock ; to separate, divide ; re- 
move. (Se, apart, grex.) 
Sell-a, ae, /, a seat, stool, chair, sedan. 

(Contr.for scdula, from 86u.;0.) 
SSmel, adv., once, once for all. (Root 

sem-, as in eem-per, slm-ul, sim-plex, 

Ac.) 
Semper, adv., always, at all times, ever. 

(See Semel.) 
Senator, sgnatOr-is, m., a senator,— mem- 
ber of the Soman Senate. (Same root 

as s5n-ex.) 
Senat-US, us, (or l,) m., the Senate, or 

supreme council of t/ie Romans. (Same 

root as s6n-ex.) 
Senez, gen, sen-is, adj., old, aged: as 

subst., an old man or woman. (For 

comparison see p. 37, 5.) 
Senior, m., senior, /, gen. sCnlOr-is, 

J>lder. (See p. 37, 6.) 
Seni-um, l, n., old age; feebleness of age, 
Jtebilrty, dotage; decay. (Seneo, to be old) 
Senon-es, (Galli,) um, m., theSenone^,, a 

Oallic tribe. 
Sensi, perf. ind. act. o/sentio. 
Sens-US, us, m., the power of feeling ; 

feeling, sensation, sense. (Sentio.) 
Sententi-a, ae, /., mode of thinking; 

opinion, judgment, sentiment. (Sent-io.) 
Sentio, sensl, sensum, sent-Ire, to feel, 

heat, see, think, be of opinion. 
Sep61-i0, Ivi, (ii,) sepultum, BgpSl-Ire, 

to bury, inter: obliterate. 
8gp-i0, si, turn, Ire, to surround with a 

hetige; enclose, protect, (bupes, a hed^e.) 



Septem, card, num., seven. 
Septim-US, a, um, ord. num., seventh. 
Sepulchr-um, (or sepulcrum,) i., n., a 

place of interment, a sepulchre, tomb. 

(Sepelio.) 
•f-'' 3lt as, a, am, perf. part, of sepella 
^ . ' 1-i, orum, m. pi., the Sequani, a 

..<i tribe, 
•ci^UOr, sCciitus sum, sequi, (dep.,) to 

follow, attend; pursue. 
Sermo, sermon is, m., conversation, 

speech, discourse. (Sero.) 
Ser-US, a, um, late, too late : sera noctc, 

late at night. 
Serv-a, ae, /, a (female) slave. 
Serv-io, ivl or ll, Uum, ire, to be a slave, 

to serve, (I.e., be suly'ect to) ; to serve, 

(l.e., to benefit), with dat. (Scrvus.) 
Servltus, servitut-ls, /, servitude, bond- 
age, shivery. (Seivlo.) 
Servi-US, i, m,, Servius (Ttdlius), proj>er 

name, 
Serv-0, avi, atum, are, to save, keep, 

preserve ; retain ; watch ; observe ; keep 

close to, 
Serv-US, i, m., a slave; servant. 
Sese, accus. andabl. of sui. (Se repeated.) 
SetOS-US, a. um, bristly, covered with 

rough hair. (Seta.) 
Seu, conj. (=sive), or if, if: seu— seu, 

whether — or. 
Sex, card num., six, 
Sextil-is, is, e, belonging to the sixth 

month (Le., August.) As subst., August. 

(Sex.) 
Sext-U8, a, um, ord. num., sixth. 
Sext-US, i, m., Sextus, (Tarquinius.) 
Si, conj., if, since, 
Sic, adv^, in this manner, thus, so. 
SicC-US, a, um, without mouture, dry, 

parched: in sicco, in a dry place. 
Sicili-a, ae, /., Sidly. 
SiCUt, (sicutl), adv., so as, just a,?, as it 

were. (Sic, ut) 
SlduS, 8ld6r-is, n., a star ; constellation. 
Signific-0, avi, atum, are, to make a 

sign, indicate (by signs); show, point out; 

denote, mean, signify. (Signum, facio.) 
Sign-um, i, n., a mark, sign, signal; 

statue. 
Sllenti-um, i, n., silence, stillness. 

(Sileo.) 
Sll-eo, ui, Ere, to be still, to keep silence. 
Si1v-a. aft, f /t froo^ forest. 
Silvi-a, ae,/, Silvia, (proper name.) 
Simll-is, in, e, liJke, similar. For uuta- 



i 



LATIN VOCABULARY. 



233 



paratlve, see p. 37, (2.) (Root slm-. 
See Semcl.) 
SIminter, adv., in lit: nanner, rimi- 
larly. 

BImliitfldo, slmilltudln-ls, /, likeness, 

resemblance. (Similia) 
Simi-a, ae, /, an ape. 
8Imi-as, l, m., {see Simla), an ape. 

(Slmus, Jlat-nosed.) 
Simpliclter, adv., one by one, singly; 

timply, plainly ; directly ; sincerely. 

(Simplex.) 
SImul, adv., at the same time, together. 

{See Semel.) 
SImulaci'-um, l, n., an image, likeness; 

shadow, reflection ; ghost. (Simulo.) 
Slmiil-O, (or similo), avi, atum, are, to 

make like, to imitate, copy; pretend, 

fiign. (Sim ills.) 
Sine, prep, with abl, without. 
Singul-i, ae, a, distrib. num., one by one, 

one each, individually. (Root sin-, or 

slm-. See Semel.) 
^nister, slnistr-a, slulstr-um, left, on 

the left ; unlucky, 
SSnO, sivi, sTtum, sln-6re, to let alone, 

allow, permit, suffer, 
SIll-UB, us, m., a fold (of a robe) ; bosojn; 

bay (of the sea.) 
Si quia, si qua, si quid, or slquod, if 

any, whoever. 
Sit-io, ivl, itum, ire, to feel thirst, thirst 

for, (Sitls.) 
Sit-is, Is,/, thirst. 
Sive. (See Seu.) 
S5bol-es, (or suboles), Is, /., an offspring, 

progeny. 
Socer, 80c5r-l, m., a father-in-law. 
SocietaS, socletat-ls, /, companionship, 

society, intercourse. (Soclus.) 
Soci-aS, 1, m., a partner, companion. 
85crat-es, is, m,, Socrates. 
Socr-US, us, /., a mother-in-law. 
Sodal-is, is, fTJ. or/., a companion, mate, 

associate. 
Sol, sol-is, m., the sun. 
Soleo, solltus sum, «61-5re, to be accus- 
tomed, to be wont, 
Solerti-a, ae,/, (or sollertla), skill, dex- 
terity; shrewdness, cunning. (Solers.) 
SSHd-US, a, um, jfrm, compact, dense, 

solid; whole, entire. 
SSlitUdo, solitudTn-is, /, being alone ; 



Br\14t*tf1a 1a 






881it-US, a, um, accuttOTned; (perf. part. 
^Boleo.) 



S51nm, adv., along, only. (Solus.) 
Sol-US, a, UTn, alone, solitarTf. lonely. 
S61ut-US, a, \s.m,free, unrestrained; (perf. 

part, o/solvo.) 
Solv-0, 1, sOiatum, solv-Sre, to until, 

loosen^ let go; break up, dissolve; to 

pay.^ 
Somni-um, 1, n., a dream. (Somnns.) 
Somn-us, l, m., sleep. 
Sonipes, gen. sonipca-ls, adj., with sound- 
ing feet; noisy-footed: as subst., (pott.) 

a horse, (Sonus, pea.) 
Son-0, ul, Itum, are, to sound, eclto. 

(Sonus,) 
Son-US, i, m., sound. 
Soph-US, i, m., o wise man, philosopher. 
Sorbltio, sorbltiou-is, /, broth, soup ; a 

drink. (Sorbeo.) 
Sordid-US, a, um, dirty, foul; beat, mean. 

(Sordeo, to be dirty.) 
Sdror, sSror-ls, /., a sister. 
Sors, sort-is, /., lot, chance, fate, destiny. 
SpargO, sparsi, sparsum, sparg-fire, to 

scatter, spread, diffuse, 
Spati-um, i, n., space, room, extent, 

distance; space (of time.) 
Speci-es, el,/, a seeing, sight, view; an 

appearance, likeness, image; kind. (Spec- 

io.) 
Spectaciil-um, i, n., a show, sight, spec- 

tacle, exhibition, public game, (Specto.) 
Spectator, spectatOr-ls, «»., a looker on, 

spectator. (Specto.) 
Spect-O, avl, atum, are, to look at. gaze 

at, observe, examine; have an eye to, 

watch, guard; to look toward, Le., lie 

toward. (Specio.) 
Speciil-uni, i, »., amirror, looking-glass, 

(specio): in speculo lympharum, in 

the glassy surface of the water. 
SpSc-US, us, (o: I,) TO., (sometimes f. and 

n.,) a cave, cavity, den. 
Sper-O, avl, atum, are, to look for ; hope 

for; expect. 
Sp-eS, el,/, a looking for, expectation; 

hope. 
Spirlt-US, us, m., a breath of air, breeze; 

breath; spirit, soul. (Spiro.) 
Spir-0, avi, atum, are, to blow; breatfie; 

live. 
Splendld-US, a, um, bright, shining; 

magnificent, splendid. (Splendeo.) 
Spoliat-US, a, um, stripped (of armour, 

a€.,) plundered; (ptrf. pari, qfspoiio.) 

Sp51i-0, avi, atum, Si-e, to stHp, plunder, 
spoil. (Spolium.) 



ill 



234 



LATIN VOCABULARY. 



SpSli-nm, 1, n., booty, tpoU, prey: pL, 
8p5lia. 

Sptlm-0, &vl, atum, ftre, to foam, froth. 
(Spuma, foam.) 

St&bill-um, I, n., a standing place; stall, 
stable. (Sto.) 

Stagn-um, l, n., standing water ; apool, 
pond; fen, marsh. (Sto.) 

Stitim, adv., immediately, forthwith. 
(Sto.) 

St&tio, statlfln-lfi, /., a standing place, 
post, station. (Sto.) 

St&tU-a, ae, /, a statue, image. (Statnn.) 

StatU-0, 1, (n)tuni, 6ie, tosctvp, erect; 
establish; resolve. (Status, /^-om sto.) 

SterCUS, stercOr-ls, n., dung; filth. 

Steril-is, is, e, ui0^i(ful, ban-en; waste; 
unprofitable. 

Stipendi-um, l, n., a tax, tribute, pap. 
(For stipipendium, fi-om [stips] stipis, 
a gift; and pendo, to pay.) 

Sto, stSti, stfttum, st-ftre, to stand. 

Str&ment*um, i, n., straw, utter; a 
covering. (Sterne, stra-vi.) 

Strenu-US, a, um, active, vigorous, ener- 
getic; bold. 

Strig-O, avl, atum, are, to halt (in the 
furrow), rest; delay, take leisure. (Strix, 
a furrow.) 

Studiose, adv., zealously, eagerly ; care- 
fuUy. (Studlosus.) 

StudidS-US, a, um, tedious; careful; in- 
dustrious, diligent. (Studium.) 

Studi-um, i, n., teal, eagerness; study. 
(Studea) 

Stultiti-a, &e,f.,foUy, silliness. (Stult- 
us.) 

Stult-U8, a, um, foolish, silly. 

Stilpens, gen, stupent-is, pres. part, of 
8tup-eo, ui, ere, to b« stunned, sense- 
less, bewildered. 

Stupor, stupor-is, m., numbness, insensi- 
bility; stupidity; astonishment. (Stup- 
eo.) 

Saadeo, suasl, snasum, suad-Sre, to ad- 
vise, exhort, urge. 

Siib, prep, with abl, unuer, beneath; 
close to : (of time,) t», during, at : '-ith 
accus., (indicating motion,) to, be- 
neath, under ;, war to ; close to. 

Subd51-US, a, um, somewhat crqfty, de- 
eeii/Ul, Ac. (Sub, dolus.) 

SubdtlCO, subduxi, subductam, subdnc- 
6re, to draw or lead up; draw off. 
carry away, remove. (Sub, duco.) 

BabigO, subegi, aubactum, sublf^-Sre, 



to bring under or up; subdue. (Sab, 
ago.) 

Subinde, adv., from time to time; nov 
and then. (Sub, lude.) 

SubltO, adv., suddenly. (Subitus.) 

Sublt-US, a, II m, sudden, unexpected. 
(Subeo, to come up.) 

Subject-US, a, um, (perf. part, of sub- 
jicio,) lying beneath • lying near, bor- 
dering on, subjoined ; subject to. 

Subjicio, subjSci, subjectum, subjtc-Sre, 
to put under, make subject to; throw 
fi-om under (upward;) bring up to 
mind; to substitute. (Sub, jacio.) 

SublSv-0, avi, atum, are, to lift up; sup- 
port; assuage. (Sub, levo.) 

Subllci-US, a, um, resting on piles: 
Pons Sublicins, a wooden bridge over 
the Tiber, resting on piles. (Sublica, a 
pile.) 

Subllm-is, Is, e, uplifted, lofty, high, 
elevated. 

Sublustr-is, is, e, slightly luminous, 
glimmering ; darkish. (Sub, lux.) 

Succed-0, successi, successum, succgd- 
6re, to go under, or c^fler ; to follow, 
succeed; to go up, march up, ascend; 
succeed, \.Q., prosper. (Sub, cedo.) 

Success-US, us, m., success, good-speed 
(Succedo.) 

Succumb-0, succubui, succubUuni, 
8uccumb-6re, to put one's self under: 
fall down ; yield to. (Sub, cumbo.) 

Succurr-0, i, succursum, succurr-6re, 
to run under; runup to; help, succour; 
to occur to. (Sub curro.) 

Svii, of himself, Ac. (See p. Al.) 

Sum, fui, esse, to be, to happen. (See p. 
78.) 

Summ-a, ae, /, (res being understood,) 
the main thing ; summit ; chi^ power ; 
the whole amount, total sum. (Fern, of 
Bummua) 

Summ-US, a, um, (superl of supenis, 
p. 37,) the highest, greatest, utmost, 
supreme. 

Sum-0, psi, or si, ptum, or turn, gre, to 
take, lay hold of, receive ; choose, select 

Super, prep, with abl., above, over; on, ' 
about, concerning : with accus., (indicat- 
ing motion,) on to, upon, over, above; 
as adv., above, over and above, more- 
over. 

Superbfi, adv., proudly, haughtily. (Su- 
perbus.) 

Superbi-a, ae, /, uppithntss, pride; 



« 



LATIN VOCABULARY. 



235 



hauffhtinat , tj^annieal dealing. (Su- 
perbus.) 

Saperb-as, a, um, uppUh, proud; 
haughty; tyrannical (Super.) 

Superinoldens, superlnchl' nt-ls, part., 
fnUirg on from above. 

Sup8r-ior, ior, iiis, gen, superior-is, 
(compar. of snperus,) higher, greater, 
Buperior to ; former, ike. 

Supersum, 8ui)erfui, supereMe, to be 
over; to he l^t, remain, survive; to 
abound. (Super, sum.) 

8iip8r-as, a, um, being above, high, up- 
lifted; in pL, superl, the gods above. 
For compar., lee p. 37. (Super.) 

Supplex, gen. suppllc-ls, a^., begging 
humbly; suppliant, submissive, humble: 
as subst., a suppliant. (Sub, pllco.) 

Supplloi-nm, l, n., apubUe prayer; wor- 
ship; satisfaction; punishment. (Suppllco.) 



Snpra, prep, with acfus., above. 
SUs. Bu-is, m. or/, a pig, boar, tow. 
Suscept-US, a, um, undertaken, begun, 

( perf. part, of susciplo.) 
Suscipio, suscCpl, susccptum, lusclp- 

gre, to take up, undertake, begin. (Sub, 

ciipio.) 
Suspend-O, 1, suspensum, suspend Jre, 

to hang up, suspend; put to deat/t. 

(Sub, penda) 
Suspens-US, a, um, perf. part, qf sus- 

pendo : suspenso pedo, on tiptoe, 
Sustln-eo, ui, oustentum, siistln-Sre, to 

hold up, sustain, support; endure. 

(Sub, teneo.) 
SvistVLli, perf. ind. act, o/tollo, or suffero; 

which see. 
Su-U8, a, um, possessive pron., his ou»i, 

her own, its own, t/ieir own. 



T&bem-a, ao, /., a hut, booth ; shop, inn, 

tavern. 
T&b-es, Is, /., a tecuting away, consump- 
tion ; plague, Crabeo, to waste.) 
T&bul-a, ae, /, o plank, board, tablet : 

(plcta) tabula, a painting: xli Tabulae, 

the I'welve Tables of Laws, 
T&clt§, adv,, silently, quietly; secretly, 

(Tacitus.) 
T&Clt-ns, a, um, (perf. part, of taceo, 

to be silent,) silent, still, noiseless, peace- 
ful (Taceo.) 
Tact-ns, us, m., touch. (TanKO.) 
Tact-UB, a, nm, perf. part, of tango. 
Taedet, impers. verb, it disgusts; it 

wearies. (Seep. 97, 4.) 
Tal-is, Is, e, »ttcA as, of such kind: talis 

— qualis, such— as. 
Tal-US, 1, m., an ankle, ankle-bone: a 

die ; pi, dice. 
Tain, adv., so, so much. 
T&men, adv. and conj., yet, however, 

nevertheless. 
Tan&quil, Tanaqull-ls,/, Tanaquil 
Tandem, adv., at length. 
Tango, tStlgi, tactual, tang-Sre, to 

touch; influence, affect. 
Tanquam, adv., as much as, as if, as it 

were. 
Tan turn, adv.. only. 
Tant-118, a, um, so great, so large, such. 
Tard-ttf, a, um, shw, tardy ; iasy. 



Tarpei-a, ae,/., Tarpeia, 
Tarquini-i, orum, m. pi, TarquinU, 

Etrurian town. 
Tarquini-us, i, m., Tarquinius. 
Tartare-U8, a, um, belonging to Tctr- 

tarus ; hellish, infernal (Tartarus.) 
T&ti-US, i, m., Tatius. (Titus.) 
Taur-U8, i, m., a bull 
Tect-um, i, «., a covering, roof; house. 

(Tego.) 
Tego, texl, tectum, tgg-gre, to cover, 

hide ; protect, defend. 
Tellu8, teliar-ls, /, the earth, 
Tel-um, 1, n., a missile, weapon ; a dart. 
Temo, temOn-is, m., a pole (of a waggon.) 
Temper-O, fivl, atum, are, to nwdemU ; 

govern; guide, direct. (Tempus.) 
Tempestas, tempestat-is, /, time, ceci- 

son; weather; storm. (Tempus.) 
Templ-um, i, n., a temple. 
Tempus, tempCr-is, n., time, season, 
Tendo, tSiendi, ten-sum, (and -turn,) 

tend-6re, to stretch, reach, 
Ten-eo, ui, turn, ere, to hold, keep, re- 
tain; recollect. 
Tener, a, um, tender, soft, delicali; 

young 
Tens-U8, a, um, stretched; (perf, part, of 

tendo.) 
T$nt-^ iLyV st-titn, iv* to toti£h, feel' 

try, attempt, (Tendo.) 
TSnU-iSi is, e, (stretched out;) thin,f.ri«, 



236 



LATIN VOCADULAKY. 



il*ndf.' ; gentle t imatt ; natrou). (Tan-, 

roolo/ tendo.) 
TSnuitas, ttnuttat-is, /., tMnnm, lien- 

detnesi, ilimness; itisign^ance. (Ttii- 

uis.) 
Terg-um, l, n., a back ; u riJgt; a tergo, 

in or on the rear. 
Tern-i, «e, a, t/tree each; {dietrib. num.) 
Terr-a, ae,/., the earth. 
Terr-€0, ul, Itum, ere, to terrify, af- 
fright. 
Territ-US, a, nm, affrighted; (perf part. 

o/terreo.) 
Terror, terrOr-ls, »»,, fright, terror. 

(TciTCO.) 

Terti-UB, a, nm, {ord. num.,) third. 

(Ties.) 
Test-dr, &tus sum, art, to bear witness ; to 
call to uitnets; implore. (Testis, a wit- 
ness.) 
TStigi^ perf. ind, act qf tango. 
Tiber-XS, is, m., the (river) Tiber. 
Tlgill-am, i, n., a small beam, or log. 

(Tlgnum.) 
Tlm-e^, ul, 5re, to fear. : mmor.) 
TImld-UB, a, uni./earyti/, zimid. (Tlm- 

co.) 
Timor,, tlmOr-ls, m.,fear. 
Tinct-U8, a, um, dipped (into); dyed, 

stained, (T?ngo.) 
Tingo, (or tlnguo,) tinxl, tlnctum, ting- 

6re, to dip ; dye, stain. 
Tintinnabul-om, i, n., a bell. (Tin- 

tinno, to jingle.) 
Titus, I, m., Titus. (Tatlus.) 
T51er-0, fivl, atum, iU-e, to endure, bear, 

suffer. 
ToUo, BusttUI, sabiatum, toll-6rc, to lift 

up, raise; takeaway; kill. 
Tonitr-US, us, m., (or tonitru-um, 1, n.,) 

thunder. (Tono.) 
T6n-0, ul. Hum, are, to thunder; roar. 
Tensor, ton80r-i8,,fa, a barber. Cfon- 

deo.) 
Torqueo, torsi, tdirtura, torqu-5re, to 
twist, turn about, whirl round; fling, 
hurl; thrust. 
Torv-US, a, um, stem, fierce, wHd-look- 

ing, savage. (Torqueo.) 
T6t-US, a, um, the whole, all 
Trad-0, Idi, itum, gre, to give or hanu 
(wer, deliver; hand down, tell, report, 
(Trans, do.) 
Trftdvlco, tradnxl, traductum, trftdflc- 
$re, to lead across, trur^fer, transport, 
(Transduco.) 



Tr&ho, traxi, tractum, trSh-Sre, to drag, 

draw ; to spend, pass. 
TrajiciO, trajecl, trajcctum, tr^lc-fire, 

to throw across, transport; to cross; 

(opxerce. (Trans, Jaclo.) 
Tranquilliter, adv., peacefutty. (Tran- 

quilluR.) 
Trans, prep, with acctu., on the farther 

side, beyond, across. 
TransdilCO, tiunsduxl, transductum, 

transdQc-Cre, to lead (tcross, Ac, (See 

Traduco.) 
Trans-eo, Ivl, (or 11,) itum, ire, to go 

across; pass over, by, or through. 

(Trans, eo.) 
Transf IgO, transflxl, trnnsflctum, tran». 

flg-ere, to pierce through, stab. (Trans, 

Ago.) 
Transfiig-io, l, Itnm, 8re, to flee over to 

the other side; to desert. (Trans, fugio.) 
Transil-io, Ivl, (or ui,) ire, to bound 

over, leap over; pass over hastily. 

(Trans, salio.) 
Transn-0, Svi, atum, are, (or trSno,) to 

swim over, or across. (Trans, no.) 

Trecentesim-UB, a, um, ord. num., 

the three hundredth. (TrecentL) 

TrScent-i, ae, a, card, num., three hun- 
dred. (Tres, centum.) 

TrSdScim, card num., thirteen. (Tres, 
decern.) 

Trepid-0, avl, aturr., are, to be in confu- 
sion, or in fear; to bustle about; to 
tremble ; to run about in fear. (Tre- 
pidus.) 

Tres, tres, trla, (see p. 39,) card, num., 
three. 

Tribunal, trlbunai-is, «., a judgment- 
seat; pla^orm. (Triburus.) 

Tribun'-US, 1, m., chief of a tribe; a tri- 
bune. (Tribus.) 

Tribii-0, 1, (fl)tum, 6re, to give, appor- 
tion, assign, (Tribus.) 

I'ribiit-um, i, n., tribuU; a tax; con. 
tribution. (Trlbuo.) 

Triggmin-US, a, um, of triple birth; 
three bom at a birth. (Tres, gemlnus.) 

Trigint-a, card, num., thirty. 

Trist-is, is, e, sorrowful, sad, melan' 
choly. 

Triumph-C, av], atum, are, to triumph, 
rejoice. (Triumplius.) 

Troj-a, ae,/., Troy. 

Trilcid-o, avi, atum, are, to aii m a 

ct?'VfyS t^ttjr, to TnSsSiiert, iruicfter, slay, 

(I'rux, harsh; am/ caedo.) 



lATIN VOCABULARY. 



237 



n 



Tn, tnl, id pen. pron., Ihou. 

Ttlb-a, ae, /., a trumpet. 

Tu-eor, ltu» sum, (tutua,) BrI, (o watch, 

observe ; guard, protect. 
T&ffjiri-lim, 1, n., a hut, cottage. 
TuUi-a, ae,/, Tullia. 
TuUi-US, i, m., Tulliut. 
Tull-US, 1, m., Tullus. 
Turn, adv., then, at that time. 
Ttlm-eo, ul, Cre, to twell, to be puffed 

Tilmaltn-or, fttus rom, Srl, to raue 
a tumult i be tn confueion. (Tumult- 
us.) 

Tlimalt-as, us, (or l,) m., a tudden up- 
rising, an inturrection, uproar, tumult, 
disturbance. (Tumeo.) 

Tunc, adv., then, at ttuit very time. 
(Turn, -ce.) 

Turb-a, ae, /, disorder ; a crowd, rabble ; 
commotion. 

Turb-0, fivi, fitutn, are, to throw into coti- 
/usion; to disturb. (I'uiba.) 



Turbttlent-ua, a, nm, dUordrred, agi' 

tated, confused; muddy. (Turba.) 
Targld-na, a, um, swollen; boislerom, 

(of the sea) ; distended, puffed up. (Tur- 

Keo, to swell.) 
Turp-is, Is, t, filthy; base, low, mean, di*. 

graceful; wjly. 
Turpiter, adv., basely, iham^ully. (Tiir. 

pis.) 
Turpitado, turpttndtn.ls,/,^///!; base. 

ness, disgrace. (Turpis.) 
Tu8Culan-U8, a, nm, of or belongimj ic 

Tuscjilum, (a ioum in l.atittm.) 
Tiltel-a, ac, /., sc^fe^keeping, protection, 

guardianship. (Tutor.) 
Tutor, tQt0r-i8,m., a protector, guardian. 
Tflt-or, atus, arl, toprotirt. dffemi. 
Ttlt-UB, a, um, safe, guarded, secure. 

(Tueor.) 
Tu-U8, a, um, possessive pron., tfty oe 

thine. (Tu.) 

Tyranu-UB, l, m., a ruler; sovereign; 
tyrant. 



u. 



ITber, HbCr-Is, n., v teat, udder; also 

as ac(j., fertile, rich. 
TTbi, ado., where, when. 
XJbique, adv., wherever, everywhere. 
UMque, (te., ubl que,) and when. 
Ull-US, a, um, any, any person. (Said 

to be for unulm, from unus.) 
TJltimum, adv., for the last time. 
Ultim-US, a, um, {superl. of obsolete niter,) 

the farthest away; earliest; latest; first. 
Ultro, adv., on the farther side, beyond: 

hence, beyond one's expectation ; of one's 

own accord; vehemently. "^ 
Umbr-a, ae, /, a shade, shadow. 
Und-a, ae, /, water, a wave. 
Unde, adv., from which place or circum- 
stance, whence. 
Ungu-is, is, TO,, a nail, claw; a hoof. 
TJnic-U8, a, um, sole, only; unparalleled, 

unique. (Unus.) 
TTnquam, adv., at any time; ever. 
Un-US, a, um, one. {Seep.Zh.) 
Unusquisque, unaquaeqne, unum- 

quodque, each (by himse^T), every. 

(Unns, qolaque.) 



Urb-8, urb-is,/, a city, town. 

Tlrge-O, (or nrffueo,) nral, nrg-«re, to 
press hard, force, drive, urge. 

TJsquam, adv., anywhere. 

Usurp-O, avi, stum, are, to use (without 
a proper right to); apply; practUe ; 
usurp. (Usu, riipio.) 

T7t, (or uti,) cor\;., that, in order that, so 
as, so that ; how ; when. 

TTtcanque, adv., ftowsoever. 

Uter, utr-a, utr-um, (seep 35, 8), which 
of two, whether. 

Uterque, utraque, utrumque, each of 
two, both. 

TTti, coiy., that, Jbc. (See Ut.) 

TJtll-is, is, e, useful, advantageous, pro- 
fitable. (Utor.) 

Utilitas, utilitat-Is, /., usefulness, advnn' 
tage. (Utiiia) 

Utor, nsus sum, uti, (dep. 3,) to use, em- 
ploy, exercise. 

TTtrinque, adv., on both sides. 

Uv-a, ae, /., a grape. 

Uxor, uxor-is, /., a m^*. 



;^ 






238 



LATIN VOCABULAHY. 



V. 



VaCO-a, ae, /., a r<m. 

V&oa-US, a, um, empty, /i'e«J^y>m, having 

nothing. (Vaco.) 
V&d>um, 1, *>., a thalloui place (inuater), 

a ford. 
Vaglt-as, us, m., frying, tifuallinff (of 

children.) (V&K\a, to x/itall.) 
V&gf-or, atiu sum, arl, (d^p. 1.) to roam 

about at will, ramble, wandtr, 
V&l-eo, ul, Itum, 6re, to be in good health; 

to bi itrong. 
ValldiiiB, adv., more/brcibjy, more vehe- 
mently, more importunately. (Vulld- 
ua.) 
V&lld-as, a, um, in good liealth ; strong, 

powerful, sturdy. (Valeo.) 
Vin-U8, a, um, empty; vain; vuUss. 
Vari-U8, a, um, spotted; variegated; of 

many kinds, various ; changing. 
Vari-V8, l, m., Varius, (propername.) 
Vast-O, ftvi, atum, Are, to lay waste, de- 
vastate. (Vastus.) 
Vast-US, a, um, empty, desert, waste; 

immense, vasL 
V&t-es, «=, »;». or/., a prophet, soothsayer; 

a poet. 
Veient-es, lum, m. pi, the Veientes, 

people of Veii. 
Vel, con}-, or, even, only : vel— vel, 

either— or. (Volo.) 
Vel&t-US, a, um, covered over, veiled; 

(perf. part, o/velo.) 
Veloz, gen. veiOc-la, a^/., swift, rapid, 

nimble. 
V8lut, (velutl,) even as, as if, as it loert, 

(Vel, ut) 
Ven&tor, venatOj>is, m., a hunter. (V3- 

nor.) 
Vend-0, tdl, Itum, 6re, to sell; {contr.for 

venum do.) 
V8ni-a, ae,/., leave; favour; indulgence; 

pardon. 
VSnio, v6nl, ventum. ven-Ire, to come, 
V§n-or, atus sum, ati, to hunt. 
Venter, ventr-ls, m., the belly. 
Vent-US, i, m., the wind. 
Venus, VSn5r-is, /., Fenus, goddess of 

love. 
Ver, v6r-is, n., spring. 
VerbSr-O, avi, atum, are, to lash, whip. 

(Verbera, n. pi., whips.) 
Verb-Um, l, n., a word. 



V8recund-US, a, nra, modtM, baihfid 

shy. (Vereor.) 
VSreor, verltus sura, vBr-Crl, (dep. 8,) to 

feel awe, to fear, 
Veritas, vSiltat-ls, /, trutf\fulness, truth, 

sincerity. (Venin.) 
Vero, adv., in truth, in reality; but, how- 
ever. 
Vers-O, avl, itum. Are, to turn, twist, 

turn over ; plough, till. (Verto.) 
Vers-US, UB, m., a furrow, line, row; a 

verse, line of poetry. (Verto.) 
Vertex, vertlc-is, m,, a turn, whirl; top 

cf the head; turning point; summit. 
Vert-0, 1, versuin, vert-fire, to turn, turn 

round, twist; change, 
Verum, adv., truly; but, however. 
Ver-US, a, um, true, reed, sincere, 
Vesp-a, ae, /., a wasp, 
Vest-a, fc? /, \the goddess) Vesta, 
Vestal-is, In/., a vestal virgin, priestess 

qf Vestci, 
Ves-ter, tra, tmm, possess, pron., your. 
Vestlbul-um, l, n., a front court, court, 

vestibule, 
Vest-io, ivl, (11,) Itum, Ire, to clothe, 

cover. (Vestls.) 
V8st-is, Is,/., a garment, robe. 
V^tUS, gen. vctCrla, a<^., old, ancient. 
Vi-a, ae, /., a way, road, street ; Jour- 
ney. 
Viator, viator- is, m., a traveller, way. 

farer. (Via.) 
VlCin-ns, a, um, n^ar, neighbouring: as 

subst., a neighbour. (Vicus.) 
Vicis, ^en.— vlcem, accus.— vice, abl:pl 

vices, dkc, change, fate, vicissitude. 
Victor, vlct(5r-is, m., a conqueror: as 

adj., victorious. (Vlnco.) 
Vict6ri-a, ae, /, victory, success. (Vic- 
tor.) 
Vict-US, a, um, perf. part- of vlnca 
Vic-US, 1, m., a street, a village. 
Videlicet, adv., it is evident, plainly; 
na7neli, (Vide, imperat. of video, and 
licet) 
Video, vId-1, vfs-um, vld-gre, to see, per- 
ceive, look at ; consider, think. 
Videor, visus sum, vid-eri, to he seen; 

seem; appear. (Video.) 
VI?i]-0; avi, Afiini: Ai-R, in t(fn watek 
Se vigilant, (Vigil, watc}\ful.) '' 



LATIN VOCABULARY. 



239 



Vn-li, It, e, valwleu, vorthUu ,• ehtap ; 

mtan, bate. 
Vlll-a, ae, /., a eounlty home; farm; 

villa. 

Villlc-ai, a, um, belonging to a country 
house: as lubsl., a land-steward, over- 
seer, grieve. (Villa.) 

Vlmlnil-is, !«, e, Viminal, {one of the 
hills of Rome) ; as com. a<(/., belonging 
to osiers. (Vlmen.) 

Vinoo, vicl, vlctum, vlnc-6Te, to conquer, 
subdue. 

Vinoiil-am, l, n., a band, rope, cord; 
fetters; pruon. (VInclo.) 

VindIO-0, ftvl, atum, arc, to lay claim to, 
to appropriate, secure; avenge; revenge. 
(VIndex.) 

Vindiot-a, ae, /, vengeance; revenge, 
(VIndlco.) 

V\ne-a,,M,f.,av^^^eyard; a vine. 
Vln-um, I, n., wine. 

Viol-0, fivl, atum, &re, to do violence to, 
iryu7-e; dishonour, violate: vlolttie fld- 
em, to break one's uord, 
VIpir-a, ae, /., a viper. 
Vir, vir-i, jn., a man; husband. 
Vires, vlrlum, /., pi. of vis, strength, 

power; forces. (See p. 34.) 
Virg-a, ae, a rod, twig. 
Virgini-a, ac, /., Virginia, daughter 

of f'irginius. 
Virgini-U8, i, m., Virginius. 
Virgo, virgln-Is,/, a virgin, maiden. 
Vlrid-is, Is, e, green, fresh. (Vireo.) 
Virtus, virtat-is, /, manliness ; worth, 
merit; virtue; valour, courage. (Vir.) 
Vis, accus. vim, abl. vl, /, (See p. 34,) 

strength, force, power, might. 
Vls-0, i, um, 6re, to look at, view, survey; 

go to visit. (Video.) 
VlBU, 2d supine o/ video. 
VlS-UB, a, wm, perf. part, o/ video. 
Vlt-a,ae, /,/(/& 

Vlti-um, i, n., a fault; defect; crime; vice. 
Vlt-0, avi, atum, are, to avoid, shun. 
Vltfil-us, 1, m., a calf 
VItupgr-0, avi, atum, are, to find fault 
witfi, censure, blame. (Vitium. paro.) 



VIv-0, vlil, Tictum, vlT-Jre. to liu; evim 

l\fe. 
VIv-US, a, nm, alive; fresh. (Vim) 
Vix, adv.. with difflculty. 
Vobisoum, (<.<•., cum vobis,) with yon. 

(See note J, p. 45.) 

V6cIf8r-or, fttus sum, an, (dep. y.) to 

shout, cry aloud. (Vox, fcro.) 
V8c-0, avi, fttum, arc, to use the voice, 

call, shout; invite; name, (Vox.) 
V81It-0, .Ivl, atum, are, to fly to and fro, 

flutter. (Volo, tofiy.) 
V51-0, avi, atom, an-, tofly; make haste. 
V61-0, ui, velle, (see p. 00,) to wish; be 

willing. 
V61Goer, and volucr-ls, It, c, winged, 

flying; swift. (Volo, to fy.) 
V61U0r-ii, is, /, a winged creature ; a 

biri. (Volo.) 
Vfilimtas, voluntftt-l8, /., willingnettf 

wisfi, desire; accord. (Volo.) 
V81uptas, voluptat-l8,/.,p/«Mwre, eryoy. 

ment. (Volo, to wish.) 
V61flt-0, avi, atum, are, to roll about, 

wallow. (Volvo.) 
Vomer, vOmgr-ls, m., a ploughshare. 
V6t-um, I, n., a vow; wish; promise. 

(Voveo.) 
V8ve-0, vOvl, vCtum, vCv-gre, to dcdi. 

cate; vow; promise; wish. 
Vox, vOc-is, /., a voice, cry, sound; tut' 

pression. 
Vulcan-US, I, m., Vulcan, god of fire. 
VulgO,adt?., commonly, usually ; publicly, 

(Vulgus.) 

Vulnerat-US, a, um, wounded; (petf. 

part, of vuinero.) 
Vulner-0, avi, atum, are, to uound. 

(Vulnus.) 
Vulnus, vuln6r-l8, n., a wound. 
Vulpectll-a, ae,/., a little fox; a youn^ 

fox. (Vulpea) 
Vulp-es, Is,/, a/ox. 
Vulpin-us, a, um, belonging to a fox 

(Vulpes.) 
Vultur, vultiSr-is, m., a vulture. 
Vult-U8, us, m., t/teface, countenance. 



z. 

Zmaragd-us, 1. m. or/, an emerald. | 26n-a, »e,f.,abeU, ginBe. 



.i 



ENGLISH YOCABULiRY 



A., article, usuaVp untramJated ; $ome- 

time) expressed by quidam. 
Abandon, v. relinquo, reliqui, rellctum, 

relinqugre. 
Able, {to be,) v., possum, potul, posso. 
About, (round about,) oircum, with accus. 
About, (concerning,) de, tcith abl. 
About, (nearly,) circlter. 
Above, super, prep, with accus. or abl. 
Across, trans, prep, with accus. 
Active, (full of energy,) acer, acrls, 

acre; implger; sSdulus. 
Admire, »., admir-or, atus, Rri : express 

admircUion, laudo. 
Adorn, t)., om-o, are; exorno. 
JEneas, JEue-as, ae, m. 
Afarj (from afar,) longe ; prScul. 
Afraid, (don't be afraid,) nOll timere. 
Aft^f , post, prep, with accvs. 
Against, in, with acr'U.; contra, with 

aecus. 'Against' is sometimes merely 

the ' sign ' of dative case. 
Agreeable, grat-us, a, um ; jucund-us, 

a, um. 
Aim at, (*ee*,) pSto, petSro 
All, (every,) omn-ls, is, e: the whole, 

tOt-us, a, um: all together, cuncc-us, 

a, um. 
Along with, cum, prep, with abl 
Alps, Alp-es, ium, m. 
Also, etlam, adv.: not only— but also, 

non solum — sed etiam. 
Am, sum, ftii, esse. 



Ambassador, legShis, i, m. 

Among, inter, prep, with accus. 
And, et, ac, atque, -que. 
Anger, ir-a, ae,/. 
Animal, animal, animal-is, n. 
Another, (of two,) alter, altera, alt*- 

um ; (of many,) alius, alia, aliud. 
Anxious, (to be anxious,) vdlo, vSlol, 

velk. 
Apple, mal-um, i, n. 
Apple tree, mai-us, i,/. 
Are, (we.) Bumus; (you,) estls; (lliey,) 

sunt. 
Aristides, Arlstld-es, is, m. 
AriOVistUS, Ariovist-us, i, fTi. 
Army, exerclt-us, us, m. 
Around, circum, prep, with accus. 
Arrival, advent-us, us, m. 
Arrow, sagitt-a, ae, /. 
Ask, rog-0, avi, atum, are. 
Ass, asin-us, i, m.; diminutive, aselluB. 
Assemble, conv6n-io, 1, tum, ire. 
Associate, c5mSa, comltis, m. or /. ; 

socius, m. 
Athens, AthCn-ae, amm, /. pi. 
At, in, prep, with abl. ; ad, prep, with 

accus. ; apud, prep, with accus. 
Attack, oppugn-o, avl, atum, are; ador* 

ior, adortus sum, adoiiri; facere im« 

petum in. 
Auburn, fl:.v-us, a, um. 
Avoid, vlt-o, fivi, atum, are. 
Aze, sScdr-is, is,/. 



B. 



Baggage, 
ill, pTl-a, ae,/. 



Imp5dlmeut-a, orum, pi. n. 

Bar 

Bank, rip-a, ae, /. 

Bam, borre-um, 1. 



Battle, pugn "«,/.,• praell-um, 1, n. 
Be (to), sum, fu., esse. 
Beak, rostr-um, i, n. 
Bear, f6ro, tiUi, latum, ferrc. 



ENGLISH VOCABULARY. 



243 



Feather, pioin-a, ao,/ 
Feel, sent-io, Bcns-i, sans-um, aent-Ire. 
Fellow-citizen, civ-is, is, m. or/. 
Field, ftger, agrl, m.; arv-um, i, n.; ru^ 

rdr-is, n. 
Fierce, Scer, or ncr-ls, is, e ; fgr-us, a, 

um; fSrox, gen. feiOc-is. 
Tight, pugn-o, avl, atum, Bre. 
Ful, impl-eo, 6v1, etum, 6ro j compleo. 
Finish, fin-lo, ivl, Itum, ira 
Fire, {set on fire,) Incend-o, 1, incensum, 

incend-gre. 
First, prIm-uB, a, um. 
Fish, piRC-is, is, m. 
Flaak, l&tus, latCr-is, n. 
Fleet, clas8-is, is, / 
Flesh, caro, cam-is, / 
Flight, rag-a,ae,/. 
Float, nat-o, avi, atum, are. 
Flock, giex, gr5g-is, m. 
Flower, flos, flOr-ls, m. 
Fly, (subst.,) musc-a, ae, /. 
Fly, (verb,) v51-o, avl, atum, 5re. 
Fodder, pabtil-um, i, n. 
Fold {of a robe, dec), sIn-us, us, m. 
Fold {/or sheep), ovil-e, is, n. 



Follow, sCquor, secQtus sum, se^ul, 

(dep. 3.) 
Following, (next,) postCr-us, a, um. 
Foolj stult-us, 1, m. 
Foolish, etult-us, a, um. 
Foot, p5s, pCd-is, m. 
For, (i.e., during), per, with accus.; or 

accus. only. 
For, {sign of dot.) No separate word. 
Force, vis, vim, vl, /. ; pi, vires. {Set 

p. 34.) 
Force, {to force a passage,) iter facere 

per vim. 
Forces, cOpl-ae, arum,/, pt 
Forest, sllv-a, ae,/. 
Form, s1mulachr-um, I,n.; efflgi-ea, el, 

/. ; flgur-a, ae, / 
Fortify, mnn-io, ivi, Itum, Ire. 
Fortunate, feiix, gen. fellc-is, adj. 
Fox, vulp-es, is,/. 
Free, {verb,) llber-o, avi, atum, aro. 
Friend, amic-us, I, m. 
Frog, ran-a, ae,/ 
From, {away from,) ab, or a, with abl.; 

{out of,) ex, with abl.; (from all part*,) 

nndique, adv. 



0. 



Gander, anser, aiiaSr-is, m. 

Garden, hort-us, i, m. 

Gate, port-a, ae,/.; Janu-a, ac,/. 

Gauls, Gall-l, Drum, m. 

General, (l.e., military commander,) dux, 

due-is, m. ; imperator, imperatOr-is, wi. 
Germans, GermSn-l, orum w. pi. 
Giant, gigas, gigant-is, m. 
Gift, dCn-um, 1, n. 
Girl, puell-a, ae, /. 
Give, do, d5di, datum, dSre. 
Glory, glOri-a, ae, / 
Go, eo, ivl, Ttum, ire. 
Go-a-hunting, v5n-or, atus sum, ail, 

{<iep. 1.) 



God, De-US, 1, OT. 

Goddess, de-a, ae,/ 

Good, bdn-us, a, um. 

Goose, anser, ansSr-Is, m. or/ 

Govern, imp5r-o, avi, atum, are; (governs 
dat.) 

Grass, gramcn, grnmln-is, n. 

Grateful, grat-us, a, um : to feel grate- 
ful, habere gratias. 

Grave, sCpulclir-um, i, n. 

Great, magn-us, a, um. 

Grove, nSmus, ncmOr-ls, n. ; luc-ua, I, 
m. 

Guide, dux, diic-is, m. or f. 



H. 



Hair, c6m-a, ae, / ; capill-us, i, m. ; 

head of hair, caesari-es, ei,/ 
Happy, felix, gen. felicis; beat-us, a, 

um. 
Harbour, port-ns, us, m. 
Hare, ifipus, lep6r-ls, m. 
Harvest, mess-iSiis, / 



Hasten, festin-o, Svl, atum, are. 
Hateful, OdiOs-us, a, um. 
Hatred, 5di-um, i, n. 
Have, liab-eo, u!, Ttum, Bie. 
Head, caput, capU-is, n. 
Hear, aud-lo. Ivl, itum, Ire. 
Heat, LSior, calSr-ls. tru 



244 



ENGLISH YOCABULARY. 



Heavy, grfiv-ls, in. e. 

Help, uuxili-um, i, a 

Helpless, Iners, gen. inerl-ii), a(ij. 

Helvetii, HeU-gti-l, ormn, »». pi. 

Her (own), SU-U8, a, nm. 

High, alt-US, a, um. 

Hill, coll-is, is, m. 

His (oum), su-us, a, um. 

Hold, tSn-eo, ul, turn, gre. 

Holy, sanct-us, a, um; sJicer, sacra, 

sacrum. 
Home, dfim-us, us, /., (set p. 26 ;) at 

home, domi. 
Honour, liSnor, or honos, honOr-is, m. 
Hope, spes, spgi, /. 



Horn, corn-u, ns, n. 
Horse, 6qu-us, i, vu 
Horseman, equSs, eqult-is, m. 
Hostage, obsSs, obsld-la, m. or/ 
Hostile, inimic-us, a, um ; hostil-ls, is, e. 
House, dOm-us, us,/. 
Huge, ingens, gen. ingent-is, adj. 
Hunt, v5n-or, atus sum, ari, (dtp.) 
Huntsman, vSnator, venatOr-is, m. 
Hurl, torqueo, torsi, tortum, torqu-Bre : 

jacio. 
Hurt, n5c-eo, ul, ttum, ere; (govems 

dat.) 
Husbandman, agrlc5l-a, ae, m. 
Hut, cas-a, ae, /. 



I. 



I, ego, mel, (Seep. 41.) 

Ice, glicl-es, ei, /. ; g61-u, ns, n. 

Idle, ignav-UB, a, um; iuers, gen. 

is. 
If, si, conj. 

Illustrious, clar-us, a, nm. 
Immense, ingens, gen, ingcnt-is. 
Impartial, aequ-us, a, um. 
In, In, prep, with abl 



inert- 



adj. 



Infant, Infans, infant-is, m. or/. 
Inhabitant, IncSl-a, ae, ♦r-. or/. 
Injure, nOc-eo, ui, Itum. ere. 
Injury, injuri-a, ae,/. 
Into, in, prep. tPith accus. 
Invoke, inv6c-o, avi, atum, are> 
Is, est, (Sdsing. o/sum.) 
Island, insiil-a, ae, /. 
Italy, It&li-a, ae, /. 



Jackdaw, gracRl-ua, I, m. 
Javelin, hast-a, ae, / 
Judge, judex, judlcls, m. 
Juno, JQno, Junon-ls,/. 



J. 



Jupiter, Japiter, JSv-ls, m. 

Just, aequ-us, a, um ; just-ns, a, um. 

Justice, Justlti-a, ae, /. 



K 



Keep, serv-o, avi, atum, are,; (one's pro- 

mise,) servare f Tdem. 
Kill, nSc-o, avi, atum, are ; interflcio ; 

occido. 
Kind, bland-US, a, un ; kind-Uarted, 

benign-u8, a, um. 



King, rex, rgg-is, m. 
Kiss, oscul-um, i, n. 
Knock (at), puls-o, avi, Rtum, lire. 
KnoWi nosco, nOvi, nOtum, nosc-Cre 
scio. 



Labour, ISbor, InbOr-is, m. 
Labour, labor-o, avi, atum, ara 
Lamb, agn-us, i, m. ; agn-a, ae, /. 
Lament, fl-eo, evi, etum, ere; maer-co. 
Land, terr-a, ae, /. ,• native land, patri-a., 
ae,/. 



T.a n cni a nr a 1 ( 



Large, magn-us, a, um. 

Late-at-night, sera nocte, abi,. 

Lately, nuper, adv. 

Law, lex, ISg-ls,/. 

Lay (i.e., prepare) snares, pSrare in- 

sidias. 
Lead, uuc-o. dax-i, duet-um. due-5re 



ENGLISH VOCABULARY. 



245 



ns 



Leaf, fOll-nm, i, n. 

Leap upon, insll-io, ui, or Ivi, insult- 

nm, ln8il>Ir& 
Leam, disco, didici, disc-Cre. 
Leave, relinquo, rellqui, relictum, re- 

llnqu-6re. 
Legion, legio, legion-is,/. 
Let, sign of imperat. or sub. used as im- 

perat 
Letter, epistOl-a, ae,/;liter-ae, arum,/. 
Level, aequ-us, a, um ; plan-us, a, uin. 
Liar, mendax, mendac-is, m. or/. 
Lie, j&c-eo, ui, Itum, ere. 



Lieutenant (.-Oenercu,, iejjat-ua, i, ./*. 

Life, vit-a, ae, /. 

Lion, leo, leSn-is, m. 

Livelong, tCt-us, a, um. 

Log, tiglU-uin, i, n. 

Long, long-US, a, uin. 

Long-time, diu, adv. 

Loose, lax-US, a, um. 

Loud voice, (tnth a,) magna v5ce, (abl.) 

Love, amor, ainor-is, ;/t. 

Love, am-0, avi, atum, are. 

Luxury, luxuii-a, ae, /.; luxuri-es, el,/ 



M. 



Macedonian, MacSdo, MacedSn-is, m. 
Magnificent, splendld-us, a, um. 
Maid-servant, ancill-a, ae, /. 
Ms ce, fac-io, f6c-i, fact-um, fSc-Sre. 
Make (one's sel/mcuter of), potior, pot!tus 

sum, potiri, with abl. or gen. 
Make war, inferre (or facere) bellum. 
Man, vir, viri, m. ; mankind, li6mo, hom- 

inis, m. or/. 
Many, pi., mult-i, ae, a ; (mult-us, a, 

um, mttc/u) 
Marry, ducere uxSrem (said of the 

man) ; nubgre, tDith dat, (said of the 

uoman.) 
Master, mSgister, magistr-1, m., (a mas- 
ter who teacha or guides) ; dSmln-us, i, 

m., (a master who owns.) 
Master, (to make one's self master of) 

pStior, potltus sum, potiri, witli gen. or 

abl 
Mate, (yoke-fellow,) mas, mSr-is, m. 
Medicine, mgdicin-a, ae, /. 
Message, nunti-us, l, m. ; commission, 

mandat-um, i, n. 



Messenger, nunti-us, i, m. 

Military, mUItar-is, is, e. 

Milk, lac, lact-is, n. 

Mind, anim-us, i, m. 

Misfortune, cas-us, us, m. ,■ ciad-ea, 

js,/ 
Mix, misc-eo, ui, mistum, or mixtum, 

misc-ere. 
Month, mcns-is, is, m. 
Moon, lun-a, ae,/ 
More, plus, adv.; magis, adv.: also sign 

of comparative. 
Most, maxima, adv.: also sign of super}. 
Mother, mater, matr-is, /. 
Mother-in-law, socr-us, us,/. 
Motion, mot-us, us, m. 
Mound, aggerj agggr-is, m. 
Mountain, mens, mont-is, m. 
Mouse, mus, mur-is, m. 
Mouth, OS, JSr-is, n. 
Move, m6v-eo, 1, mOtum, mov-ere. 
Much-loved, car-us, a, um. 
Mud, lim-us, i, m. 
My, me-us, a, um. 



N. 



Name, nOmen, nomTn-is, n. 
Native-country, patri-a, ae, / 
Nature, natflr-a, ae,/. 
Naughty, mai-us, a, um ; nequam, 

(indecl.) 
Near, apud, (or ad,) prep, with accus. ; 

prope. 
Nearer, propius 
Neck, coii-uin, i, n 
Necklace, mOnll-e, is, n. 

Neighbouring, proxim-us, 



um ; 



Neptune, NeptOn-us, l, m. 
Net, ret-e, is, n. 

Never-ending, aetem-us, a, um. 
New, n6v-us, a, um; rCcens, gen. rc- 

cent-is. 
Night, nox, noct-is, /. 
Nobody, nemo, nemln-is, m. 
No one, nemo, nemln-ls, m. 
Not, non; not—onij/, but— alto, noiiBOl< 

um, sed etiam. 
Not, with imperatives, ne. 
Nttt) uux, nac-is,/. 



246 



ENGLISH VOCABULARY. 



Oak, qnerc-us, us, /. 

Obey, par-eo, ui, itum, ere ; ob5d-lo, ivi, 

Itum, ire. 
Obtain, Impetr-o, 5vi, Stum, are; ob- 

t!n-eo, ui, ere. 
Occupy, obtin-eo, ul. Sre; occQp-o, avl, 

atum, are: (takepom'.ssionof,) potior. 
Often, saepe, adv. 
Old, antiqu-us, a, um ; v6tus, gtn. retgr- 

ia ; BSnex, gen. s&nia. 
Old man, sgnex, sgn-is, m. 
Oldest, natu maxim-us, a, um. 
On, in, prep, with abl. 
On an equality, par, gen. pSr-is. 
One, un-us, a, um: one of two, alter, 

alt6r-a, um : one of many, ali-us, a, ud. 
Only, ac(/'., unlc-us, a, um ; sOl-us, a, um. 



Only, adv., sSlum, niOdo. 

Open, apSr-io, ui, turn, ire. 

Order, juss-us, us, m: by the order 

j^issu. 
Order, Jubeo, Jussl, jussum, jub-ore. 
Ornament, dgcus, decOr-is, n. 

Ornament, orn-o, avi, atum, aro," 

dec3r-o, avL 
Other, alter, altSr-a, um. 
Our, noster, nostra, nostrum. 
Over, (as, over the Alps, sea, dtc.,) per. 

prep, with accus. 
Overcome, vinco, vici, victum, vinc-6re 

supero. 
Own. (See His, Her, Its, Jic.) 
Ox, bos, bOv-is, m. 



P. 



Pain, dSlor, dol3r-i8, m. 

Palace, aul-a, ae,/.; rSgl-a, ae,/. 

Pale, pallld-us, a, um. 

Parent, pSrens, parent-is, m. or /. 

Part, pars, part-is,/. 

Parthians, Parth-i, orum, m. pi. 

Passion, {desire,) cupiditas, cupldltatlg,/. 

Partner, sCci-us, i, m. 
Peace, pax, pac-is, /. 

Peacock, pavo, pavOn-is, m. 
People, p6piil-us, i, m. 
Perish, per-eo, ii. Hum, Ire. 
Persuade, persuadeo, pcrsuftsi, per- 

suasum, persuad-ere. 
Pillar, column-a, ae, /. 
Place, 16C-U3, i, nu; pi, loci, m., or 

loca, n. 
Plain, camp-US, i, m. 
Please, plSc-eo, ui, ttum, 6re. 
Plentiful, (e.g., harvest,) cfipiSs-us, a, 

am; larg-us, a, um. 



Plenty, cOpl-a, ae,/. 
Plough, aratr-um, i, n. 
Plough, ar-o, avi, atum, are. 
Poet, poet-a, ae, m. 
Point out, monstr-o. avi, atum, are. 
Poor, inops, gen. Indp-is; pauper, yen. 
paup6r-is. 

Poplar tree, pSpul-us, i,/. 

Powerful, valid-us, a, um ; pStens, 
gen. potent-is: to be very powerful, 
plurimum posse. 

Praise, laus, laud-is,/. 

Praise, l«.ud-o, avi, atum, are. 

Prepare, par-o, avi, atum, are. 
Priest, sacerdos, sacerdot-is, »/». or/. 
Promise, promiss-um, i, ?». ; f Id-es, ei,/, 
Province, provinci-a, ae,/. 
Punishment, poen-a, ae, /. 
Pupil, dlocipul-us, 1, 7IU 
Pure, ptlr-us, a, um. 
Put to flight, fug-o, avi, atum, Ore. 



Q 



Qneen, rSgln-a, ae,/. 



Quickly, cSlSrlter; clta 



£. 



Bace, (kind,) genu^ genSr-is, n. 
Eampart, agger, agger-is, m. ; vall-um, 

1, n. 
Beaeh, attingo, attlgi, attactum, atting- 



Reason, ratio, ratiOn-is,/ 
Republic, respublica, reipublicae,/ 
Repulse, repello, repuli, repulsum, re- 
pell-fire. 
■ Rest- (6<u«,} 5ti-iim, i. n. 



1 



ENGLISH VOCABULARY 



247 



Best, (remainder,) rgllqu-us, a, um: 

the remains, rellqui-ae, arum, /. pL 
Retreat, (to retire,) referre p6dem. 
Beturn, reverter, reversus sum, revertL 
Blime, KhSn-us, i, m. 

Rhodes, KhSd-us, i,/ 

Rich, dives, gen. divlt-is, ac^. 
Ride, 6quIt-o, avi, atum, are. 
Ripe, matur-us, a, um. 
River, amn-ls, is, m.; rtvus, 1, m. ; 
flOmen, flumlii-Is, n. ; fluvi-us, 1, m. 



Road, Tl-a, ae, /. : Iter, ItlnCr-la, n,, (fl 

journey.) 
Robber, latro, latrOn-is, *n. 
Roman, lioman-us, a, lun. 
Kome, Rom-a, ae,/. 
Rough, asper, asp6r-a, um. 
Round, ac^., r6tund-us, a, nm. 
Round, prep., (= around,) chcuin,tw<A 

accus. 
Rout, ffig-o, avl, atum, are. ^ 

Run, cuiro, cucurri, cursum, currerc 



s. 



Sagacious, sagax, gen. sagac-is, a^ 
Sail, navIg-0, avl, atum, are. 
Sailor, naut-a, ae, m. 
Same, idem, eadem. Idem. 
Savage, saev-us, a, um; fSrox, gen. 

ferOc-is. 
Say, dico, dixi; aio; inquam; f5ro. 
Scipio,. Scipio, Scipion-is, m. 
Sea, niSr-e, is, n. 
See, video, vidi, visum, vid-Sre: see that, 

fac or facite ut, mth subj. 
Senate, senat-us, us, (or l,) m. 
Senate-house, curi-a, ac,/. 
Send, mitto, misi, missum, mitt-gre. 
Serious, (m the sense of 'great,' 'dan- 
gerous,' as of a war,) grSv-is, is, e. 
Servant, serv-us, 1, m. ; minister, min- 

istri, m. 
Service, (to he of service,) prSsum, pro- 

fui, prodesse: to be of great service, 

multum prodesse. 
Set on fire, iucend-o, i, incensum, iu- 

"nnd-5re. 
Set out, prSflciscor, profectus sum, pro- 

flciscL 
Shade, umbr-a, ae, /. 
Shadow, umbr-a, ae, /. 
Shallow-water, ySd-um, i, n. 
Share, pars, part-is, f. 
Sharp, acut-u8, a, um. 
Sheep, 6v-i8, is, / 
Sheep-fold, 6vn-e, is, n. 

Shepherd, pastor, paster- is, m. 
Shift, mSveo, movl, mStum, m5v-5re. 
Ship, nav-is, is, / 
Shore, litus, lltSr-is, n. 
Short, brgv-is, is, & 

Show, (point ou*,) monstro; show off, os- 
tend-o, i, osten-sum, or-tum, ostendere. 
Sicily, Sicni-a,ae,/. 
Side, Ifttua, later-ls, n. 
Sight, cuuMpuci-us, us, m. 



Sing, cant-0, &vi, stum, ore; ciiuok 
c6clni, cautum, canfire. 

Sister, sSror, sorOr-is,/. 

Size, magnitudo, magnitQdln-is, /. ; 
body, corpus, coi'pOr-ia, n. 

Skin, pell-is, is,/; cut-is, Is,/. 

(Slave, serv-us, i, m. 

Slave, (be slave to,) serv-io, 11, Itum, 
ire. 

Slaughter, caed-es. Is,/. 

Slay, n6c-o, avi, &c. ; Interflclo, Inter- 
fEci, &c.; occido, occidl, <fcc 

Sleep, dorm-io, Ivl, itum, Ire. 

Slender, gracil-ls, is, e ; tguu-ls, is, e. 

Sling, fund-a, ae/. 

Small, parv-us, a, um. 

Smooth, lev-Is, 13, e. 

Snares, Insldl-ae, arum, /. pi. 

Snow, nix, niv-ls,/. 

Socrates, Socrat-es, is, m. 

Soil, sQl-um, 1, n. 

Soldier, miies, mint-is, m. 

Some, (certain,) quidam, quaedam, quod- 
dam. 

Son, fBl-us, 1, m. 

Sorrowing, trlst-ls, is, e; flcns, gea. 
flent-is. 

Sound, s5n-us, 1, m. 

Sour, aci'^us, a, unj. 

Source. : .teri-es, ci,/ 

Spacioii. ampl-us, a, um. 

Spade, llgu, llgon-ls, m. 

Spare, parco, pgpercl, (or parsl,) pars- 
urn, (or parcltum,) parcgre. 

Speak, Idquor, locatus sum, loqui; 
dice. 

Speech, oratlo, oratlCn-ls, /. ,- sermo, 
semi(5n-ls, m. 

Speedily, cglSrIter : (soon,) st&tim. 

Splashy sfin-'.is, L, m. 

Splendid, srlendld-us, a, um ; tnagnl* 
fleas, a, um. 




248 



ENGLISH VOCABULARY. 



Spring, v8r, Tei'-is, n. 

Spur, calcar, ^alcar-is, n. 

Stag, cerv-us, i, m. 

Stall, st&bQl-um, I, n. 

State, civltas, civitat-is, /. ; respubllca,/. 

Statue, sign-urn, i, n. ; atutu-a, ae,/. 

Step, grid-US, us, m. 

Stick, fust-is, is, 771. 

Strength, vis, vim, vl, /,• pi, vLes, 

virium. (See p. 34.) 
Strong, yaild-us, a, um; fort-is, is, e. 
Strongly fortified, UCno (or egregle) 

munlt-us, a, um. 
Sturdy, vaiid-us, a, um. 
Subject, i/ellotB-citizen,) cTv-ls, Is, m.or/. 
Successfully, feilclter, adv. ; bSue, 

adv. 



Sue for, p6t-o, !vl, Itum, fire; Br-o, Svi 

&c. 
Summer, acstas, aestat-is,/. 
Summit of, vertex, vertlc-is, m.: 

Bumm-us, (a, um,) with subal.; cu 

Summus nions, the top of iht mouit- 

tain. 
Sun, sOl, sOl-is, m. 
Sunset, occ3s-us (us, m.) sClis. 
Suppliant, supples, suppllc-is, m. or/ 
Supply, praeb-eo, ul, 5ie ; niliiistr-o, 

avt, <fec. ; do, dSdi, &c. 
Swan, cycn-us, 1, m. 
Sweet, dulc-is, is, 0. 
Swell, tiim-eo, ui, gre. 
Swim, no, nSvi ; n&t-o, avi, <fcc. 
Sword, ens-is, is, m. ; gl&di-us, i, m. 



T. 



Table, mens-a, ae,/. 

Tail, caud-a, ae,/. 

Take, cfipio, cepi, captum, cap-Sre : tale 
care, (be cautious,) caveo: take care, 
(see to it,) cur-o, -avi, <fcc. : take a ualk, 
ambul-o, -avi, &c 

Tall, alt-us, a, um ; procgr-us, a, um. 

Teach, ddc-eo, ui, turn, ere. 

Tear, lacrlm-a, ae,/. 

Temper, anim-us, l, m. 

Temple, templ-um, i, n. ; aed-es, is, /. 

Tend, cur-o, avi, atum, are. 

Tender, tgner, tengr-a, um. 

Tent, (i.e., general's tent,) praetOrl-um, 

Terrify, terr-eo, ui, Itum, 5i i 

Territory, fin-es, ium, m. 

Terror, tenor, terrOr-is, n*. ; in terror, 

pavid-us, a, um. 
Than, quam, adv. 
That, iUe, Ula, illud. (See p. 42.) 
That (of yours,) Ist-e, a, ud. (See p. 43, 

7.) 
Their, bu-us, a, um. (Seep. 42.) 
Thief, fur, irar-is, m. or/. 
This, hie, haec, hoc; is, ea, id. (Seep. 42.) 
Through, per, prep, with accus. 



Throughout, per, prep, with accus. 

Throw open, apgr-io, ui, turn, ire. 

Thunderbolt, fulmen, fulmin-is, n. 

Thy, tu-us, a, um. 

Timid, tlmld-us, a, um 

To, (motion towards, against, itc.,) ad. 

with accus. ; also sign qf dat. 
To-morrow, eras, adv. 
Tongue, lingu-a, ae,/ 
Tooth, dens, dent-is, m. 
Top, vertex, vertlc-is, m. ; summus, with 

subst. (See Summit.) 
Towards, ad, prep, with accus. ,- in, wit/i 

accus. 
Town, opptd-um, I, n. 
Train, erud-io, ivi, Itum, ire. 
Transgress, (an oath, promise, Ax.,) 

viol-o, avi, atum, are. 
Treati (a6o«<, negotiate,) figo, ggl, Ac; 

as, to treat of peace, agere de pace. 
Tree, arbor, (or arbos,) arbSr-is,/ 
Trumpet, tflb-a, ae, /. 
Truth, vgr-um, i, n. ; vgritas, veritut- 

is,/ 
Turn up, (as, to plough, Jtc.,) vers-o, avi, 

atum, are. 
Two, du-o, ae, o. (Seep. 39.) 



u. 



Unwilling, invit-us, a, um. 

Us, nos, pi. of ego. (See p. 41.) 

Useful, utll-is, is, e. 

Useful, (to be us^ul to,) prosum, profui. 



prGll"5ac. 



Used to, imperf. of verb; as, used to 
ride, equltabat : also exji-tsstd Oy soleo^ 
aolitus sum, solgre. 

Useless, inmil-is, is, e. 



HNGLian VOCABULAKY. 



249 



yi 



1,: 
tit- 



V. 



\ 



i 



Vaili, a^., {melas,) vftn-us, a, um. 
Vain, adv., {in vain,) frustra, nequlc- 

quam, or ncquidquam. 
Vainly, frustra, nequicquam. 



Very, sign o/superl, as, very brave, fortls- 

slmus ; very much, valde. 
Victorious, Tlctor, gen. victOr-la 
Virtue, virtQs, virtntls,/. 

Voice, vox, voc-is, /. 



w. 



Wage war, Infcrrc bellum. 

Walk about, ambOl-o, avi, <kc. 

Wall, mOr-us, 1, m. 

Want, (be wanting,) d5sura, dcful, de- 
esse. 

War, bell-um, I, «. 

Warn, mSn-eo, ui, ttum, era 

Wash, ISvo, lavi, &c 

Water, aqu-a, ae, /. 

Wave, und-a, ae,/. ; fluct-us, ns, m. 

Way; vi-a, ae, / ; Iter, itingris, n. 

Weak, {not strong,) d6btl-i8, is, e ; {deli- 
cate, tender,) tener, tengr-a, um. 

Weary, fess-us, a, um. 

What, quis, quae, quod, or quid {See 
p. 44.) 

When, quum, or cum, conj. 

Which, qui, quae, qtiod. {Seep. 44.) 

White, alb-us, a,um ; candld-us, a, um. 

Who, {relative,) qui, quae, quod ; (in- 
te rrog.,) qui, or quis. {See p. 44.) 

Wliole, tot-US, a, um; omn-is, is, e. 

Why, cur, adv. ; quid. 

Wicked, mSl-us, a, um ; prav-us, a, um; 
impr5b-u8, a, um. 

Wide, lat-us, a, um. 



Wide-meshed, rSr-ns, a, nm. 

Wife, uxor, uxor-is, /. ; cor\jux, con- 
j UK-is, /. 

Wild-boar, Sper, apr-l, m. 

Willingly, llbcnter, adv. 

Wine, vin-ura, 1, n. 

Wing, al-a, ae, /. 

Winter, hlem-s, is, /. 

Wisdom, sapienti-a, ae,/. 

Wise, sapiens, gen. sapient-is. 

With, (i.e., along with,) cum, prt-p. witn 
abl. : also sign of abl. 

Without, sine, prep, with abl. 

Wolf, lup-us, I, m.; IQp-a, ae, /., she- 
wolf. 

Woman, femtn-a, ae,/. ; raulier, muligr- 
is,/ 

Wood, silv-a, ae,/. 

Work, Opus, op6r-ls, n. ; op5r-a, ae, / 

Worn-out, defess-us, a, nm. 

Worthless, nequam, indecl. {See p. 37, 
5.) 

Wound, vulnns, rulngr-is, n. 

Wounded, vulnerat-us, a, um. 

Wretched, mtser, mlsgr-a, um>--..^ 

Write, scribo, scripsi, scriptum, scribgfc. 



Y. 



Year, ann-ns, i, m. 
Yesterday, h6ri, adv. 

You, tu, tui ; pi, V08. {See p. 41.) 



Young-man, or woman, jflvgn-ls, is, m. 

or/. 
Your, sing., tu-us, a, um; pi, vaster, 

vestra, vestmm. 



■^